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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7336
Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 9.46.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 109.9-109.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 109.9-109.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Suetonius, Claudius, 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Tacitus, Histories, 1.50 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.50.  Rome was in a state of excitement and horror-stricken not only at the recent outrageous crime, but also at the thought of Otho's former character. Now it was terrified in addition by news with regard to Vitellius, which had been suppressed before Galba's death, so that the citizens believed that only the army of Upper Germany had mutinied. Then the thought that two men, the worst in the world for their shamelessness, indolence, and profligacy, had been apparently chosen by fate to ruin the empire, caused open grief not only to the senators and knights who had some share and interest in the state, but even to the common people. Their talk was no longer of the recent horrors of a bloody peace, but they recalled memories of the civil wars and spoke of the many times the city had been captured by Roman armies, of the devastation of Italy, of the plundering of the provinces, of Pharsalia, Philippi, Perusia, and Mutina, names notorious for public disaster. They said that the world had been well-nigh overturned, even when the principate was the prize of honest men; but yet the empire had remained when Julius Caesar won, and had likewise remained when Augustus won; the republic would have remained if Pompey and Brutus had been successful; but now — should they go to the temples to pray for an Otho or a Vitellius? Prayers for either would be impious and vows for either detestable when, in the struggle between the two, the only thing of which men were certain was that the victor would be the worse. There were some who had forebodings of Vespasian and the armies in the East, and yet although Vespasian was a better man than Otho or Vitellius, they shuddered at another war and another massacre. Indeed Vespasian's reputation was uncertain; he, unlike all his predecessors, was the only emperor who was changed for the better by his office.
5. Augustine, Confessions, 1.8.13 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aristotle Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
belief, doxastic Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
capitoline hill Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
citizenship Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
claudius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
cult, mysteries, rituals, public/private Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
devotion Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
elite, senators Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
emperor, roman, cult Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
emperor, roman Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
family, slaves Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
groups, group formation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
impiety Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
livy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
ontology, social Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
petronius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
populus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
prayer, preces Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
prayer Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
priesthood, pontifices Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
psychological mode, and satisfaction Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
psychological mode, desire Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
religion, roman Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
rhetoric Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
roman religion, and prayer Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
speech act, assertion Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
speech act, commissives Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
speech act, conditions of satisfaction Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
speech act, declarations Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
speech act, directives Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 296
suetonius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
tacitus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
temples Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
vows (vota), pro salute' Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236