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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7333
Lactantius, De Opificio Dei, 2.10
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.3, 2.73, 2.121, 2.129 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.3. Even if I had any clear view, I should still prefer to hear you speak in your turn, now that I have said so much myself." "Well," replied Balbus, "I will yield to your wish; and I shall be as brief as I can, for indeed when the errors of Epicurus have been refuted, my argument is robbed of all occasion for prolixity. To take a general view, the topic of the immortal gods which you raise is divided by our school into four parts: first they prove that the gods exist; next they explain their nature; then they show that the world is governed by them; and lastly that they care for the fortunes of mankind. In our present discourse however let us take the first two of these heads; the third and fourth, being questions of greater magnitude, had better I think be put off to another time." "No, no," cried Cotta, "we are at leisure now, and moreover the subjects which we are discussing might fitly claim precedence even of matters of business. 2.73. Next I have to show that the world is governed by divine providence. This is of course a vast topic; the doctrine is hotly contested by your school, Cotta, and it is they no doubt that are my chief adversaries here. As for you and your friends, Velleius, you scarcely understand the vocabulary of the subject; for you only read your own writings, and are so enamoured of them that you pass judgement against all the other schools without giving them a hearing. For instance, you yourself told us yesterday that the Stoics present Pronoia or providence in the guise of an old hag of a fortune-teller; this was due to your mistaken notion that they imagine providence as a kind of special deity who rules and governs the universe. But as a matter of fact 'providence' is an elliptical expression; 2.121. Again what a variety tio animals, and what capacity they possess of persisting true to their various kinds! Some of them are protected by hides, others are clothed with fleeces, others bristle with spines; some we see covered with feathers, some with scales, some armed with horns, some equipped with wings to escape their foes. Nature, however, has provided with bounteous plenty for each species of animal that food which is suited to it. I might show in detail what provision has been made in the forms of the animals for appropriating and assimilating this food, how skilful and exact is the disposition of the various parts, how marvellous the structure of the limbs. For all the organs, at least those contained within the body, are so formed and so placed that none of them is superfluous or not necessary for the preservation of life. 2.129. Why should I describe the affection shown by animals in rearing and protecting the offspring to which they have given birth, up to the point when they are able to defend themselves? although fishes, it is said, abandon their eggs when they have laid them, since these easily float and hatch out in the water. Turtles and crocodiles are said to lay their eggs on land and bury them and then go away, leaving their young to hatch and rear themselves. Hens and other birds find a quiet place in which to lay, and build themselves nests to sit on, covering these with the softest possible bedding in order to preserve the eggs most easily; and when they have hatched out their chicks they protect them by cherishing them with their wings so that they may not be injured by cold, and by shading them against the heat of the sun. When the young birds are able to use their sprouting wings, their mothers escort them in their flights, but are released from any further tendance upon them.
2. Cicero, Republic, 3.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Non. 301M Est igitur quiddam turbulentum in hominibus singulis, quod vel exultat voluptate vel molestia frangitur.
3. Horace, Odes, 1.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.34. 2. Now Antiochus was not satisfied either with his unexpected taking the city, or with its pillage, or with the great slaughter he had made there; but being overcome with his violent passions, and remembering what he had suffered during the siege, he compelled the Jews to dissolve the laws of their country, and to keep their infants uncircumcised, and to sacrifice swine’s flesh upon the altar; 1.34. 7. Now when at the evening Herod had already dismissed his friends to refresh themselves after their fatigue, and when he was gone himself, while he was still hot in his armor, like a common soldier, to bathe himself, and had but one servant that attended him, and before he was gotten into the bath, one of the enemies met him in the face with a sword in his hand, and then a second, and then a third, and after that more of them;
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.692, 1.698, 1.704, 3.453, 3.464, 4.1069, 4.1083, 4.1117, 4.1268, 5.222-5.227, 5.857-5.859, 5.1159, 6.86 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Seneca The Younger, De Beneficiis, 2.29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Statius, Siluae, 2.7.76 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.118-10.119 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.118. When on the rack, however, he will give vent to cries and groans. As regards women he will submit to the restrictions imposed by the law, as Diogenes says in his epitome of Epicurus' ethical doctrines. Nor will he punish his servants; rather he will pity them and make allowance on occasion for those who are of good character. The Epicureans do not suffer the wise man to fall in love; nor will he trouble himself about funeral rites; according to them love does not come by divine inspiration: so Diogenes in his twelfth book. The wise man will not make fine speeches. No one was ever the better for sexual indulgence, and it is well if he be not the worse. 10.119. Nor, again, will the wise man marry and rear a family: so Epicurus says in the Problems and in the De Natura. Occasionally he may marry owing to special circumstances in his life. Some too will turn aside from their purpose. Nor will he drivel, when drunken: so Epicurus says in the Symposium. Nor will he take part in politics, as is stated in the first book On Life; nor will he make himself a tyrant; nor will he turn Cynic (so the second book On Life tells us); nor will he be a mendicant. But even when he has lost his sight, he will not withdraw himself from life: this is stated in the same book. The wise man will also feel grief, according to Diogenes in the fifth book of his Epilecta.
8. Lactantius, De Ira Dei, 10.17 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

9. Lactantius, De Opificio Dei, 3.21, 6.1, 6.7 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aesthetics Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138
balbus Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138
biography, of lucretius Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 223
bird/birds Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 133, 134
chance Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 214
cicero Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138
corporeal structure (of animals) Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138
cotta Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138
diuina prouidentia Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138
epicurus, epicureanism, epicureans Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 133, 134, 138
god and the divine Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 214
jerome Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 223
lactantius Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 214; Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 133, 134, 138
lucretius, biography Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 223
lucretius, devotion to epicurus Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 223
lucretius Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 214; Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 133
lucullus Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 223
providence Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 214
social behaviour (of animals)' Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 134
stoics, stoicism Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138
teleology Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 214
velleius Schaaf, Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World (2019) 138