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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7309
Juvenal, Satires, 6.533
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 2.37, 2.81 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.37. They are religious beyond measure, more than any other people; and the following are among their customs. They drink from cups of bronze, which they clean out daily; this is done not by some but by all. ,They are especially careful always to wear newly-washed linen. They practise circumcision for cleanliness' sake; for they would rather be clean than more becoming. Their priests shave the whole body every other day, so that no lice or anything else foul may infest them as they attend upon the gods. ,The priests wear a single linen garment and sandals of papyrus: they may have no other kind of clothing or footwear. Twice a day and twice every night they wash in cold water. Their religious observances are, one may say, innumerable. ,But also they receive many benefits: they do not consume or spend anything of their own; sacred food is cooked for them, beef and goose are brought in great abundance to each man every day, and wine of grapes is given to them, too. They may not eat fish. ,The Egyptians sow no beans in their country; if any grow, they will not eat them either raw or cooked; the priests cannot endure even to see them, considering beans an unclean kind of legume. Many (not only one) are dedicated to the service of each god. One of these is the high priest; and when a high priest dies, his son succeeds to his office. 2.81. They wear linen tunics with fringes hanging about the legs, called “calasiris,” and loose white woolen mantles over these. But nothing woolen is brought into temples, or buried with them: that is impious. ,They agree in this with practices called Orphic and Bacchic, but in fact Egyptian and Pythagorean: for it is impious, too, for one partaking of these rites to be buried in woolen wrappings. There is a sacred legend about this.
2. Horace, Odes, 1.12.47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.78 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Fasti, 1.453-1.454 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.453. Nor did saving the Capitol benefit the goose 1.454. Who yielded his liver on a dish to you, Inachus’ daughter:
5. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 18.65-18.80 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18.65. 4. About the same time also another sad calamity put the Jews into disorder, and certain shameful practices happened about the temple of Isis that was at Rome. I will now first take notice of the wicked attempt about the temple of Isis, and will then give an account of the Jewish affairs. 18.66. There was at Rome a woman whose name was Paulina; one who, on account of the dignity of her ancestors, and by the regular conduct of a virtuous life, had a great reputation: she was also very rich; and although she was of a beautiful countece, and in that flower of her age wherein women are the most gay, yet did she lead a life of great modesty. She was married to Saturninus, one that was every way answerable to her in an excellent character. 18.67. Decius Mundus fell in love with this woman, who was a man very high in the equestrian order; and as she was of too great dignity to be caught by presents, and had already rejected them, though they had been sent in great abundance, he was still more inflamed with love to her, insomuch that he promised to give her two hundred thousand Attic drachmae for one night’s lodging; 18.68. and when this would not prevail upon her, and he was not able to bear this misfortune in his amours, he thought it the best way to famish himself to death for want of food, on account of Paulina’s sad refusal; and he determined with himself to die after such a manner, and he went on with his purpose accordingly. 18.69. Now Mundus had a freed-woman, who had been made free by his father, whose name was Ide, one skillful in all sorts of mischief. This woman was very much grieved at the young man’s resolution to kill himself, (for he did not conceal his intentions to destroy himself from others,) and came to him, and encouraged him by her discourse, and made him to hope, by some promises she gave him, that he might obtain a night’s lodging with Paulina; 18.71. She went to some of Isis’s priests, and upon the strongest assurances [of concealment], she persuaded them by words, but chiefly by the offer of money, of twenty-five thousand drachmae in hand, and as much more when the thing had taken effect; and told them the passion of the young man, and persuaded them to use all means possible to beguile the woman. 18.72. So they were drawn in to promise so to do, by that large sum of gold they were to have. Accordingly, the oldest of them went immediately to Paulina; and upon his admittance, he desired to speak with her by herself. When that was granted him, he told her that he was sent by the god Anubis, who was fallen in love with her, and enjoined her to come to him. 18.73. Upon this she took the message very kindly, and valued herself greatly upon this condescension of Anubis, and told her husband that she had a message sent her, and was to sup and lie with Anubis; so he agreed to her acceptance of the offer, as fully satisfied with the chastity of his wife. 18.74. Accordingly, she went to the temple, and after she had supped there, and it was the hour to go to sleep, the priest shut the doors of the temple, when, in the holy part of it, the lights were also put out. Then did Mundus leap out, (for he was hidden therein,) and did not fail of enjoying her, who was at his service all the night long, as supposing he was the god; 18.75. and when he was gone away, which was before those priests who knew nothing of this stratagem were stirring, Paulina came early to her husband, and told him how the god Anubis had appeared to her. Among her friends, also, she declared how great a value she put upon this favor 18.76. who partly disbelieved the thing, when they reflected on its nature, and partly were amazed at it, as having no pretense for not believing it, when they considered the modesty and the dignity of the person. 18.77. But now, on the third day after what had been done, Mundus met Paulina, and said, “Nay, Paulina, thou hast saved me two hundred thousand drachmae, which sum thou sightest have added to thy own family; yet hast thou not failed to be at my service in the manner I invited thee. As for the reproaches thou hast laid upon Mundus, I value not the business of names; but I rejoice in the pleasure I reaped by what I did, while I took to myself the name of Anubis.” 18.78. When he had said this, he went his way. But now she began to come to the sense of the grossness of what she had done, and rent her garments, and told her husband of the horrid nature of this wicked contrivance, and prayed him not to neglect to assist her in this case. So he discovered the fact to the emperor; 18.79. whereupon Tiberius inquired into the matter thoroughly by examining the priests about it, and ordered them to be crucified, as well as Ide, who was the occasion of their perdition, and who had contrived the whole matter, which was so injurious to the woman. He also demolished the temple of Isis, and gave order that her statue should be thrown into the river Tiber;
6. Juvenal, Satires, 1.26-1.29, 6.512-6.532, 6.534-6.541, 15.4-15.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Statius, Siluae, 3.2.113 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Domitianus, 1.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Tacitus, Agricola, 45.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Tacitus, Histories, 2.78.1, 3.74, 3.74.1, 4.81 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.74.  Domitian was concealed in the lodging of a temple attendant when the assailants broke into the citadel; then through the cleverness of a freedman he was dressed in a linen robe and so was able to join a crowd of devotees without being recognized and to escape to the house of Cornelius Primus, one of his father's clients, near the Velabrum, where he remained in concealment. When his father came to power, Domitian tore down the lodging of the temple attendant and built a small chapel to Jupiter the Preserver with an altar on which his escape was represented in a marble relief. Later, when he had himself gained the imperial throne, he dedicated a great temple of Jupiter the Guardian, with his own effigy in the lap of the god. Sabinus and Atticus were loaded with chains and taken before Vitellius, who received them with no angry word or look, although the crowd cried out in rage, asking for the right to kill them and demanding rewards for accomplishing this task. Those who stood nearest were the first to raise these cries, and then the lowest plebeians with mingled flattery and threats began to demand the punishment of Sabinus. Vitellius stood on the steps of the palace and was about to appeal to them, when they forced him to withdraw. Then they ran Sabinus through, mutilated him, and cut off his head, after which they dragged his headless body to the Gemonian stairs. 4.81.  During the months while Vespasian was waiting at Alexandria for the regular season of the summer winds and a settled sea, many marvels continued to mark the favour of heaven and a certain partiality of the gods toward him. One of the common people of Alexandria, well known for his loss of sight, threw himself before Vespasian's knees, praying him with groans to cure his blindness, being so directed by the god Serapis, whom this most superstitious of nations worships before all others; and he besought the emperor to deign to moisten his cheeks and eyes with his spittle. Another, whose hand was useless, prompted by the same god, begged Caesar to step and trample on it. Vespasian at first ridiculed these appeals and treated them with scorn; then, when the men persisted, he began at one moment to fear the discredit of failure, at another to be inspired with hopes of success by the appeals of the suppliants and the flattery of his courtiers: finally, he directed the physicians to give their opinion as to whether such blindness and infirmity could be overcome by human aid. Their reply treated the two cases differently: they said that in the first the power of sight had not been completely eaten away and it would return if the obstacles were removed; in the other, the joints had slipped and become displaced, but they could be restored if a healing pressure were applied to them. Such perhaps was the wish of the gods, and it might be that the emperor had been chosen for this divine service; in any case, if a cure were obtained, the glory would be Caesar's, but in the event of failure, ridicule would fall only on the poor suppliants. So Vespasian, believing that his good fortune was capable of anything and that nothing was any longer incredible, with a smiling countece, and amid intense excitement on the part of the bystanders, did as he was asked to do. The hand was instantly restored to use, and the day again shone for the blind man. Both facts are told by eye-witnesses even now when falsehood brings no reward.
12. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 1.3.4, 7.3.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 11.24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11.24. When morning came, and that the solemnities were finished, I came forth sanctified with twelve robes and in a religious habit. I am not forbidden to speak of this since many persons saw me at that time. There I was commanded to stand upon a seat of wood which stood in the middle of the temple before the image of the goddess. My vestment was of fine linen, covered and embroidered with flowers. I had a precious cloak upon my shoulders hung down to the ground. On it were depicted beasts wrought of diverse colors: Indian dragons and Hyperborean griffins which the other world engenders in the form of birds. The priests commonly call such a habit a celestial robe. In my right hand I carried a lit torch. There was a garland of flowers upon my head with palm leaves sprouting out on every side. I was adorned like un the sun and made in fashion of an image such that all the people came up to behold me. Then they began to solemnize the feast of the nativity and the new procession, with sumptuous banquets and delicacies. The third day was likewise celebrated with like ceremonies with a religious dinner, and with all the consummation of the order. After I had stayed there a good space, I conceived a marvelous pleasure and consolation in beholding the image of the goddess. She at length urged me to depart homeward. I rendered my thanks which, although not sufficient, yet they were according to my power. However, I could not be persuaded to depart before I had fallen prostrate before the face of the goddess and wiped her steps with my face. Then I began greatly to weep and sigh (so uch so that my words were interrupted) and, as though devouring my prayer, I began to speak in this way:
14. Tertullian, To The Heathen, 1.10.17 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Tertullian, Apology, 6.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 6.231



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(mithraic) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 311
accusative, in greek construction Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
aedituus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
aesthetics Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
alexander Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
altars Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
alterity Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 311; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 410
anubis Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 413
apis Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 311
apuleius, metamorphoses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
astrologers, emperors practice of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
baelo claudia Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
beards, of priests Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
buddhism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
campus martius Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
capitoline hill Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398; Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
clothes, ritual Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 413
cult statues Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
customs, egyptian Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 111
divine-human relationships Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 148
domitian Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
egypt Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
egyptianess/egyptian Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 410, 413
egyptianism/egyptianising Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 410, 413
epiphany Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
foreign cults Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
fortune Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
gens isiaca Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 410, 413
graecisms Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
herculaneum, frescoes from Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
histories Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
identity, cultural Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 410
invidia, isis, cult of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
iseum, baelo claudia Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
iseum campensis Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
iseum capitolinum Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
iseum metellinum Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
isiac Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 410, 413
isiac cults Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 410, 413
isis, in herculaneum Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
isis, in pompeii Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
isis Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 410, 413
julio-claudian dynasty Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
jupiter conservator Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
jupiter custos Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
juvenal Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 148; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
krishna mouvements Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
lustration Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
mainz Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
mater magna Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
memory, cultural memory Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 410
mercury Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
mimesis Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 410
miracula Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
mockery Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
nijmegen, holland Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
nile Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
noise, shrill, tinkling, of sistrums Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
novel, ancient Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
ophiogenes, oriental cults Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
pastophori, sacred college, summoned by lector, ancient college, founded in days of sulla Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
phrygian cap, of attis and galli Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
plutarch, de iside et osiride Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
plutarch, on isis and osiris Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 111
poetical colouring Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
pompeii, iseum in, social origins of isiacs Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
pompeii Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 311
priests, of isis, offer new barque, priests of ritual Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
quindecimviri Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
quintus caecilius metellus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
religious virtuosity Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 148
roman religion/polytheism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
rome Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
rome and romans, and egypt Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 111
sacrifice, isiac Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
sacrifice Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
senses, cultural ascription/semantic value of Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398, 410, 413
senses, serapis Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 398
senses, visual stimuli Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 413
serapis Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 311
silver sistrum Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
sistrum = bronze rattle, carried by isis, sistrums of initiates, bronze, silver, gold Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
snake, in cult of isis Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
soul Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
stars, terrestrial, of the great faith' Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 193
superstitio Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
syria, domitian and Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
syria, priesthood of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359
taussig, michael Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 410
tiber Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 165
vespasian Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 359