Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7309
Juvenal, Satires, 3.60
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Cicero, On Laws, 2.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.8 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.8. Caelius writes that Gaius Flaminius after ignoring the claims of religion fell at the battle of Trasimene, when a serious blow was inflicted on the state. The fate of these men may serve to indicate that our empire was won by those commanders who obeyed the dictates of religion. Moreover if we care to compare our national characteristics with those of foreign peoples, we shall find that, while in all other respects we are only the equals or even the inferiors of others, yet in the sense of religion, that is, in reverence for the gods, we are far superior.
3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.89, 2.17, 3.11.4, 3.47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.89. 1.  Such, then, are the facts concerning the origin of the Romans which I have been able to discover a reading very diligently many works written by both Greek and Roman authors. Hence, from now on let the reader forever renounce the views of those who make Rome a retreat of barbarians, fugitives and vagabonds, and let him confidently affirm it to be a Greek city, — which will be easy when he shows that it is at once the most hospitable and friendly of all cities, and when he bears in mind that the Aborigines were Oenotrians, and these in turn Arcadians,,2.  and remembers those who joined with them in their settlement, the Pelasgians who were Argives by descent and came into Italy from Thessaly; and recalls, moreover, the arrival of Evander and the Arcadians, who settled round the Palatine hill, after the Aborigines had granted the place to them; and also the Peloponnesians, who, coming along with Hercules, settled upon the Saturnian hill; and, last of all, those who left the Troad and were intermixed with the earlier settlers. For one will find no nation that is more ancient or more Greek than these.,3.  But the admixtures of the barbarians with the Romans, by which the city forgot many of its ancient institutions, happened at a later time. And it may well seem a cause of wonder to many who reflect on the natural course of events that Rome did not become entirely barbarized after receiving the Opicans, the Marsians, the Samnites, the Tyrrhenians, the Bruttians and many thousands of Umbrians, Ligurians, Iberians and Gauls, besides innumerable other nations, some of whom came from Italy itself and some from other regions and differed from one another both in their language and habits; for their very ways of life, diverse as they were and thrown into turmoil by such dissoce, might have been expected to cause many innovations in the ancient order of the city.,4.  For many others by living among barbarians have in a short time forgotten all their Greek heritage, so that they neither speak the Greek language nor observe the customs of the Greeks nor acknowledge the same gods nor have the same equitable laws (by which most of all the spirit of the Greeks differs from that of the barbarians) nor agree with them in anything else whatever that relates to the ordinary intercourse of life. Those Achaeans who are settled near the Euxine sea are a sufficient proof of my contention; for, though originally Eleans, of a nation the most Greek of any, they are now the most savage of all barbarians. 2.17. 1.  When I compare the customs of the Greeks with these, I can find no reason to extol either those of the Lacedaemonians or of the Thebans or of the Athenians, who pride themselves most on their wisdom; all of whom, jealous of their noble birth and granting citizenship to none or to very few (I say nothing of the fact that some even expelled foreigners), not only received no advantage from this haughty attitude, but actually suffered the greatest harm because of it.,2.  Thus, the Spartans after their defeat at Leuctra, where they lost seventeen hundred men, were no longer able to restore their city to its former position after that calamity, but shamefully abandoned their supremacy. And the Thebans and Athenians through the single disaster at Chaeronea were deprived by the Macedonians not only of the leadership of Greece but at the same time of the liberty they had inherited from their ancestors.,3.  But Rome, while engaged in great wars both in Spain and Italy and employed in recovering Sicily and Sardinia, which had revolted, at a time when the situation in Macedonia and Greece had become hostile to her and Carthage was again contending for the supremacy, and when all but a small portion of Italy was not only in open rebellion but was also drawing upon her the Hannibalic war, as it was called, — though surrounded, I say, by so many dangers at one and the same time, Rome was so far from being overcome by these misfortunes that she derived from them a strength even greater than she had had before, being enabled to meet every danger, thanks to the number of her soldiers, and not, as some imagine, to the favour of Fortune;,4.  since for all of Fortune's assistance the city might have been utterly submerged by the single disaster at Cannae, where of six thousand horse only three hundred and seventy survived, and of eighty thousand foot enrolled in the army of the commonwealth little more than three thousand escaped. 3.11.4.  For we are so far from being ashamed of having made the privileges of our city free to all who desired them that we even take the greatest pride in this course; moreover, we are not the originators of this admirable practice, but took the example from the city of Athens, which enjoys the greatest reputation among the Greeks, due in no small measure, if indeed not chiefly, to this very policy. 3.47. 1.  Not long afterward the elder of his sons died without acknowledged issue, and a few days later Demaratus himself died of grief, leaving his surviving son Lucumo heir to his entire fortune. Lucumo, having thus inherited the great wealth of his father, had aspired to public life and a part in the administration of the commonwealth and to be one of its foremost citizens.,2.  But being repulsed on every side by the native-born citizens and excluded, not only from the first, but even from the middle rank, he resented his disfranchisement. And hearing that the Romans gladly received all strangers and made them citizens, he resolved to get together all his riches and remove thither, taking with him his wife and such of his friends and household as wished to go along; and those who were eager to depart with him were many.,3.  When they were come to the hill called Janiculum, from which Rome is first discerned by those who come from Tyrrhenia, an eagle, descending on a sudden, snatched his cap from his head and flew up again with it, and rising in a circular flight, hid himself in the depths of the circumambient air, then of a sudden replaced the cap on his head, fitting it on as it had been before.,4.  This prodigy appearing wonderful and extraordinary to them all, the wife of Lucumo, Tanaquil by name, who had a good understanding standing, through her ancestors, of the Tyrrhenians' augural science, took him aside from the others and, embracing him, filled him with great hopes of rising from his private station to the royal power. She advised him, however, to consider by what means he might render himself worthy to receive the sovereignty by the free choice of the Romans.
4. Livy, History, 36.17.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.29 (1st cent. BCE

6. Vergil, Georgics, 2.495-2.498, 2.513, 2.532-2.538 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.495. Led by the horn shall at the altar stand 2.496. Whose entrails rich on hazel-spits we'll roast. 2.497. This further task again, to dress the vine 2.498. Hath needs beyond exhausting; the whole soil 2.513. Twice doth the thickening shade beset the vine 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield
7. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 2.3, 2.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 33.41, 38.38 (1st cent. CE

33.41.  well then, suppose that a man were to judge you too by the sound that came to him from a distance, what kind of men would he guess you were and what your occupation? For you haven't the capacity for tending either cattle or sheep! And would any one call you colonists from Argos, as you claim to be, or more likely colonists of those abominable Aradians? Would he call you Greeks, or the most licentious of Phoenicians? I believe it is more appropriate for a man of sense to plug his ears with wax in a city like yours than if he chanced to be sailing past the Sirens. For there one faced the risk of death, but here it is licentiousness, insolence, the most extreme corruption that threatens. 38.38.  In truth such marks of distinction, on which you plume yourselves, not only are objects of utter contempt in the eyes of all persons of discernment, but especially in Rome they excite laughter and, what is still more humiliating, are called "Greek failings!" And failings they are indeed, men of Nicomedia, though not Greek, unless some one will claim that in this special particular they are Greek, namely, that those Greeks of old, both Athenians and Spartans, once laid counterclaims to glory. However, I may have said already that their doings were not mere vain conceit but a struggle for real empire — though nowadays you may fancy somehow that they were making a valiant struggle for the right to lead the procession, like persons in some mystic celebration putting up a sham battle over something not really theirs.
9. Juvenal, Satires, 1.26, 2.163-2.170, 3.58-3.59, 3.61-3.80, 3.84-3.85, 3.96-3.97, 3.109-3.125, 6.295-6.300 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Martial, Epigrams, 8.61, 8.61.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Martial, Epigrams, 8.61, 8.61.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. New Testament, 1 Peter, 1.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.17. If you call on him as Father, who without respect of persons judges according to each man's work, pass the time of your living as strangers here in reverent fear:
13. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 10.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.25. Whatever is sold in the butcher shop, eat, asking no questionfor the sake of conscience
14. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 11.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. New Testament, Acts, 14.8-14.18, 17.1-17.6, 17.17-17.21, 18.4-18.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.8. At Lystra a certain man sat, impotent in his feet, a cripple from his mother's womb, who never had walked. 14.9. He was listening to Paul speaking, who, fastening eyes on him, and seeing that he had faith to be made whole 14.10. said with a loud voice, "Stand upright on your feet!" He leaped up and walked. 14.11. When the multitude saw what Paul had done, they lifted up their voice, saying in the language of Lycaonia, "The gods have come down to us in the likeness of men! 14.12. They called Barnabas "Jupiter," and Paul "Mercury," because he was the chief speaker. 14.13. The priest of Jupiter, whose temple was in front of their city, brought oxen and garlands to the gates, and would have made a sacrifice with the multitudes. 14.14. But when the apostles, Barnabas and Paul, heard of it, they tore their clothes, and sprang into the multitude, crying out 14.15. Men, why are you doing these things? We also are men of like passions with you, and bring you good news, that you should turn from these vain things to the living God, who made the sky and the earth and the sea, and all that is in them; 14.16. who in the generations gone by allowed all the nations to walk in their own ways. 14.17. Yet he didn't leave himself without witness, in that he did good and gave you rains from the sky and fruitful seasons, filling our hearts with food and gladness. 14.18. Even saying these things, they hardly stopped the multitudes from making a sacrifice to them. 17.1. Now when they had passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica, where there was a synagogue of the Jews. 17.2. Paul, as was his custom, went in to them, and for three Sabbath days reasoned with them from the Scriptures 17.3. explaining and demonstrating that the Christ had to suffer, and to rise again from the dead, and saying, "This Jesus, whom I proclaim to you, is the Christ. 17.4. Some of them were persuaded, and joined Paul and Silas, of the devout Greeks a great multitude, and not a few of the chief women. 17.5. But the disobedient Jews gathered some wicked men from the marketplace, and gathering a crowd, set the city in an uproar. Assaulting the house of Jason, they sought to bring them out to the people. 17.6. When they didn't find them, they dragged Jason and certain brothers before the rulers of the city, crying, "These who have turned the world upside down have come here also 17.17. So he reasoned in the synagogue with Jews and the devout persons, and in the marketplace every day with those who met him. 17.18. Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also encountered him. Some said, "What does this babbler want to say?"Others said, "He seems to be advocating foreign demons," because he preached Jesus and the resurrection. 17.19. They took hold of him, and brought him to the Areopagus, saying, "May we know what this new teaching is, which is spoken by you? 17.20. For you bring certain strange things to our ears. We want to know therefore what these things mean. 17.21. Now all the Athenians and the strangers living there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing. 18.4. He reasoned in the synagogue every Sabbath, and persuaded Jews and Greeks. 18.5. But when Silas and Timothy came down from Macedonia, Paul was compelled by the Spirit, testifying to the Jews that Jesus was the Christ. 18.6. When they opposed him and blasphemed, he shook out his clothing and said to them, "Your blood be on your own heads! I am clean. From now on, I will go to the Gentiles! 18.7. He departed there, and went into the house of a certain man named Justus, one who worshiped God, whose house was next door to the synagogue. 18.8. Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue, believed in the Lord with all his house. Many of the Corinthians, hearing, believed and were baptized.
16. New Testament, Philemon, 2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. New Testament, Romans, 16.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16.23. Gaius, my host and host of the whole assembly, greets you. Erastus, the treasurer of the city, greets you, as does Quartus, the brother.
18. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 108.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 6.2.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Hermas, Similitudes, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Justin, Second Apology, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. A certain woman lived with an intemperate husband; she herself, too, having formerly been intemperate. But when she came to the knowledge of the teachings of Christ she became sober-minded, and endeavoured to persuade her husband likewise to be temperate, citing the teaching of Christ, and assuring him that there shall be punishment in eternal fire inflicted upon those who do not live temperately and conformably to right reason. But he, continuing in the same excesses, alienated his wife from him by his actions. For she, considering it wicked to live any longer as a wife with a husband who sought in every way means of indulging in pleasure contrary to the law of nature, and in violation of what is right, wished to be divorced from him. And when she was overpersuaded by her friends, who advised her still to continue with him, in the idea that some time or other her husband might give hope of amendment, she did violence to her own feeling and remained with him. But when her husband had gone into Alexandria, and was reported to be conducting himself worse than ever, she - that she might not, by continuing in matrimonial connection with him, and by sharing his table and his bed, become a partaker also in his wickednesses and impieties - gave him what you call a bill of divorce, and was separated from him. But this noble husband of hers - while he ought to have been rejoicing that those actions which formerly she unhesitatingly committed with the servants and hirelings, when she delighted in drunkenness and every vice, she had now given up, and desired that he too should give up the same - when she had gone from him without his desire, brought an accusation against her, affirming that she was a Christian. And she presented a paper to you, the Emperor, a very bold apostrophe, like that of Huss to the Emperor Sigismund, which crimsoned his forehead with a blush of shame.]}-- requesting that first she be permitted to arrange her affairs, and afterwards to make her defense against the accusation, when her affairs were set in order. And this you granted. And her quondam husband, since he was now no longer able to prosecute her, directed his assaults against a man, Ptolem us, whom Urbicus punished, and who had been her teacher in the Christian doctrines. And this he did in the following way. He persuaded a centurion - who had cast Ptolem us into prison, and who was friendly to himself - to take Ptolem us and interrogate him on this sole point: whether he were a Christian? And Ptolem us, being a lover of truth, and not of a deceitful or false disposition, when he confessed himself to be a Christian, was bound by the centurion, and for a long time punished in the prison And, at last, when the man came to Urbicus, he was asked this one question only: whether he was a Christian? And again, being conscious of his duty, and the nobility of it through the teaching of Christ, he confessed his discipleship in the divine virtue. For he who denies anything either denies it because he condemns the thing itself, or he shrinks from confession because he is conscious of his own unworthiness or alienation from it, neither of which cases is that of the true Christian. And when Urbicus ordered him to be led away to punishment, one Lucius, who was also himself a Christian, seeing the unreasonable judgment that had thus been given, said to Urbicus: What is the ground of this judgment? Why have you punished this man, not as an adulterer, nor fornicator, nor murderer, nor thief, nor robber, nor convicted of any crime at all, but who has only confessed that he is called by the name of Christian? This judgment of yours, O Urbicus, does not become the Emperor Pius, nor the philosopher, the son of C sar, nor the sacred senate. And he said nothing else in answer to Lucius than this: You also seem to me to be such an one. And when Lucius answered, Most certainly I am, he again ordered him also to be led away. And he professed his thanks, knowing that he was delivered from such wicked rulers, and was going to the Father and King of the heavens. And still a third having come forward, was condemned to be punished.
23. Epigraphy, Cil, 13.1668



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aborigines Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
achaeans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
africa, africans Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
alban hills Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
alien/foreigner, roman attitudes toward Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
also syncretism)' Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
anonymous lady (justin, apology Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
apelles, marcionite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
apologetic, portrait of paul Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
apuleius Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
arcadia/arcadians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
armament, gladiatorial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
arpinum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
artemidorus Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
athens Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
aventine hill Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
barbarians Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 213
caecilius natalis Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
carpocratians Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
cato, m. porcius, the elder Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
charito Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
christian confession, hiding of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
christianity Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 8
cicero, quintus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
cinaedus Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
citizenship Clackson et al., Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean (2020) 271
class status Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
corinth Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
countryside, ancestral homes in Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
countryside, charms imagined Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
customs/traditions/practices as identity markers, as differentiating peoples Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
dio chrysostom, contempt for asiatic greeks Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 395
dio chrysostom, on greek decline Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 395
dress, gladiatorial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
dress, greek Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
dress, masculine Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
dress, public ceremonial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
effeminacy, of easterners Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 232, 395
effeminacy Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
egyptians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89; Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
ethnicity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130; Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
ethnography, graeco-roman Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 213
etruscans/tyrrhenians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
etruscans Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
exile Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 8
familia, gladiatorial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
fathers-in-law Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
fear of immigrants in rome Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231, 232
flavia sophe Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
flora Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
flow Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
freedpersons (and their descendants), manumission Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
gauls/celts Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
gauls Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 8
gender Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
gentilica (names) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
geography Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 213
gladiators Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
gnostics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
grapte Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
greeks, theatre gymnasium, roman disapproval Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 395
greeks Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130; Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
gymnasium Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
helmet Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
hermas Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
homosexuality Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231, 232
identity as hybrid and malleable, in roman perception Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
immigrants Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
immigrants in rome, juvenals attack on Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231, 232
immigrants in rome Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231, 232
immigration Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
italian migrants Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
italy Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
jews Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
judaism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
justin Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
juvenal, on eastern greeks in rome Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231, 232
juvenal, street philosophers Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
juvenal Clackson et al., Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean (2020) 271; Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
latin language Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
latins Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
lex aelia sentia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
lex iunia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
london (the city) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
macedon/macedonians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
marcellina Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
marcion Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
maria/mary Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
marriage Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
martial on greek poetry Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 395
migrant identity Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
migration to rome Clackson et al., Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean (2020) 271
minucius felix Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
mockery/irony/parody, by juvenal Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
natio Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 8
nudity, athletic Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
nudity, gladiatorial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
nudity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
orontes Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231
palimpsestic rome, dynamic changeability of the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
palimpsestic rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
pelasgians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
petronius, on xenophobia Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231
philosopher Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
philumene Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
pliny (the elder), on eastern trade Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231
portraits, principate Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
preaching Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
primitive peoples\r\n, human sacrifice offered by Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 318
provincials, immigrants Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
ptolemy (valentinian, teacher of justin, apol. Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
religion Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
retiarius Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
rhetorical context as shaping evidence Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
rome/romans, and citizenship Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
rome/romans, conglomerate character of Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
rome/romans, self-perception of Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
rome Clackson et al., Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean (2020) 271; Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 213
romulus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
sabines Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
salvation Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
scipio aemilianus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
senator, senatorial Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
seneca, on environmental determinism, on greek and roman eloquence Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 395
sexuality Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
shield Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
slaves/slavery, and roman citizenship Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
sons Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
spain/spaniards/iberia/iberians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
spectacle Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
synagogue Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
syria/syrians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
syria Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
syrians Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
teaching Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 754
tiberius Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 213
trapezus Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 318
troy/trojans Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 89
umbricius (juvenal) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 270
undress Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
valerius biton Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
vernae Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 210
virtus Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
vonones, king of parthia Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 318
wife, wives Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 130
wife of governor i Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
wife of governor ii Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
women Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 352
xenophobia, in athens, in rome Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231, 232
xenophobia, in athens Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 231, 232