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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7309
Juvenal, Satires, 10
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

21a. He was my comrade from a youth and the comrade of your democratic party, and shared in the recent exile and came back with you. And you know the kind of man Chaerephon was, how impetuous in whatever he undertook. Well, once he went to Delphi and made so bold as to ask the oracle this question; and, gentlemen, don’t make a disturbance at what I say; for he asked if there were anyone wiser than I. Now the Pythia replied that there was no one wiser. And about these things his brother here will bear you witness, since Chaerephon is dead.
2. Cicero, On Friendship, 52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Lucilius Gaius, Fragments, 1207 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Letters, 2.1.157 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Sermones, 2.3, 2.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.3. for some of his writings contain much the same accusations which the others have laid against us, some things that he hath added are very frigid and contemptible, and for the greatest part of what he says, it is very scurrilous, and, to speak no more than the plain truth, it shows him to be a very unlearned person, and what he lays together looks like the work of a man of very bad morals, and of one no better in his whole life than a mountebank. 2.3. for you see how justly he calls those Egyptians whom he hates, and endeavors to reproach; for had he not deemed Egyptians to be a name of great reproach, he would not have avoided the name of an Egyptian himself; as we know that those who brag of their own countries, value themselves upon the denomination they acquire thereby, and reprove such as unjustly lay claim thereto. 2.5. For I also have observed, that many men are very much delighted when they see a man who first began to reproach another, to be himself exposed to contempt on account of the vices he hath himself been guilty of. 2.5. for when these Alexandrians were making war with Cleopatra the queen, and were in danger of being utterly ruined, these Jews brought them to terms of agreement, and freed them from the miseries of a civil war. “But then (says Apion) Onias brought a small army afterward upon the city at the time when Thermus the Roman ambassador was there present.”
6. Ovid, Tristia, 2.259 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Elder, Suasoriae, 6 (1st cent. BCE

8. Juvenal, Satires, 1.85-1.86, 10.191-10.200, 10.217-10.239 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.686 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Martial, Epigrams, 12.90 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Martial, Epigrams, 12.90 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 2.10.5, 3.8.46, 8.3.2-8.3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.10.5.  For we shall hunt in vain among sponsiones and interdicts for magicians and plagues and oracles and stepmothers more cruel than any in tragedy, and other subjects still more unreal than these. What then? are we never to permit young men to handle unreal or, to be more accurate, poetic themes that they may run riot and exult in their strength and display their full stature? 3.8.46.  Therefore when we advise Cicero to beg Antonius for mercy or even to burn the Philippics if Antonius promises to spare him on that condition, we shall not emphasise the love of life in our advice (for if that passion has any force with him, it will have it none the less if we are silent), but we shall exhort him to save himself in the interest of the state. 8.3.2.  Even the untrained often possess the gift of invention, and no great learning need be assumed for the satisfactory arrangement of our matter, while if any more recondite art is required, it is generally concealed, since unconcealed it would cease to be an art, while all these qualities are employed solely to serve the interests of the actual case. On the other hand, by the employment of skilful ornament the orator commends himself at the same time, and whereas his other accomplishments appeal to the considered judgment of the learned, this gift appeals to the enthusiastic approval of the world at large, and the speaker who possesses it fights not merely with effective, but with flashing weapons. 8.3.3.  If in his defence of Cornelius Cicero had confined himself merely to instructing the judge and speaking in clear and idiomatic Latin without a thought beyond the interests of his case, would he ever have compelled the Roman people to proclaim their admiration not merely by acclamation, but by thunders of applause? No, it was the sublimity and splendour, the brilliance and the weight of his eloquence that evoked such clamorous enthusiasm. 8.3.4.  Nor, again, would his words have been greeted with such extraordinary approbation if his speech had been like the ordinary speeches of every day. In my opinion the audience did not know what they were doing, their applause sprang neither from their judgment nor their will; they were seized with a kind of frenzy and, unconscious of the place in which they stood, burst forth spontaneously into a perfect ecstasy of delight. 8.3.5. But rhetorical ornament contributes not a little to the furtherance of our case as well. For when our audience find it a pleasure to listen, their attention and their readiness to believe what they hear are both alike increased, while they are generally filled with delight, and sometimes even transported by admiration. The flash of the sword in itself strikes something of terror to the eye, and we should be less alarmed by the thunderbolt if we feared its violence alone, and not its flash as well. 8.3.6.  Cicero was right when, in one of his letters to Brutus, he wrote, "Eloquence which evokes no admiration is, in my opinion, unworthy of the name." Aristotle likewise thinks that the excitement of admiration should be one of our first aims. But such ornament must, as I have already said, be bold, manly and chaste, free from all artificial dyes, and must glow with health and vigour.
13. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 2.10.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 2.3, 15.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 1.7, 6.1.1-6.1.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.33, 8.18 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.33. To Tacitus. I venture to prophesy - and I know my prognostics are right - that your histories will be immortal, and that, I frankly confess, makes me the more anxious to figure in them. For if it is quite an ordinary thing for us to take care to secure the best painter to paint our portrait, ought we not also to be desirous of getting an author and historian of your calibre to describe our deeds ? That is why though it could hardly escape your careful eye, as it is to be found in the public records - I bring the following incident before your notice, and I do so in order to assure you how pleased I shall be, if you will lend your powers of description and the weight of your testimony to setting forth the way I behaved on an occasion when I reaped credit, owing to the dangers to which I exposed myself. The senate had appointed me to act with Herennius Senecio on behalf of the province of Baetica in the prosecution of Baebius Massa, * and, when Massa had been sentenced, it decreed that his property should be placed under public custody. Senecio came to me, after finding out that the consuls would be at liberty to hear petitions, and said My conduct on this occasion, whatever its worth may have been, will be made even more famous, more distinguished, and more noble if you describe it, although I do not ask of you to go beyond the strict letter of what actually occurred. For history ought never to transgress against truth, and an honourable action wants nothing more than to be faithfully recorded. Farewell. %%%
17. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.33, 8.18 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.33. To Tacitus. I venture to prophesy - and I know my prognostics are right - that your histories will be immortal, and that, I frankly confess, makes me the more anxious to figure in them. For if it is quite an ordinary thing for us to take care to secure the best painter to paint our portrait, ought we not also to be desirous of getting an author and historian of your calibre to describe our deeds ? That is why though it could hardly escape your careful eye, as it is to be found in the public records - I bring the following incident before your notice, and I do so in order to assure you how pleased I shall be, if you will lend your powers of description and the weight of your testimony to setting forth the way I behaved on an occasion when I reaped credit, owing to the dangers to which I exposed myself. The senate had appointed me to act with Herennius Senecio on behalf of the province of Baetica in the prosecution of Baebius Massa, * and, when Massa had been sentenced, it decreed that his property should be placed under public custody. Senecio came to me, after finding out that the consuls would be at liberty to hear petitions, and said My conduct on this occasion, whatever its worth may have been, will be made even more famous, more distinguished, and more noble if you describe it, although I do not ask of you to go beyond the strict letter of what actually occurred. For history ought never to transgress against truth, and an honourable action wants nothing more than to be faithfully recorded. Farewell. %%%


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absence of interaction, occlusion as interaction König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 378
absence of interaction König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383
addressee Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 150, 151
adviser, satirist as, on prayer Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 137, 144
adviser, satirist as Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24
alexander Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 138, 139
amnesia König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383
ancient audience, role similar to addressee’s Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 151, 154, 166
ancient audience Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139
anger, juvenal’s changing engagement with Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 18, 120, 170
anger, symptoms of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 170
anger control discourse Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 170
animals, humans compared with Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 127, 140
augustus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 130
authenticity, thematized in satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 150, 151, 154, 165, 166
authenticity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 120
bellandi, franco Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 120
biographical readings of juvenal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 120, 210
bodies, metaphor of sickness Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 138
bodies Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 139, 140, 141, 142
career, literary, satiric careers Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 166
career, literary, turning points in juvenal’s Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 145, 170, 210
career, literary Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 210
censorship, self-censorship Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 135, 137
children, and parents Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 140, 141
cicero, m. tullius, philosophical content of letters Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
cicero Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60, 121, 136, 137
claudius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 143
cynical\x9d persona Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24
cynicism Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
de re rustica (varro), genre of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
de re rustica (varro), philosophy in Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
democritus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 148
demosthenes Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 136, 137
depression Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 148
dialogue Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113
discomfort of satire’s audience Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24, 133, 139
domitian Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 131
drama Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 119
emotional detachment Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 154
emotional plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 21, 24
ennius Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
epic, exempla from Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 128, 141, 142, 151
epistolarity, epistolography König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377
exempla Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 119, 122
fear, of imperial regime Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 135
fearlessness Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 132, 144
forgetting König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383
friendship and the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24, 60, 150, 151, 165
genre and generic interplay König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377
hadrian Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113
hadrianic literature König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 382
hair Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113
hannibal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 121, 129, 138
heraclitus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 118, 120, 124, 125, 126, 141, 148
highet, gilbert Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 210
historical subject matter, chronological regression Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 136, 138
historical subject matter Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 21
historiography Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 128; König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377
horace Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 166
house of the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 150, 151, 154, 165, 166
imitation, literary Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24, 118, 210
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60
indignatio, reappearance in later juvenal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 165
indignatio, strategies for performing Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 141
indignatio, “ironicâ€\x9d persona Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 170
joy, as target of laughter Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 118, 123
joy Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 134
juvenal, and pliny König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383
juvenal, and tacitus König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377
juvenal König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383
libertas Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 137
love Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 165
lucan König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 380
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60, 113, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 148, 150, 151, 154, 165, 166, 170, 210
messalina Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 131, 143
mockery, by characters in juvenal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 154
mockery, by juvenal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 18, 24
morality of satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 18, 21, 113
myth Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 127, 143
nero Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 130, 131, 143, 165
nostalgia for satire’s past Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24
old age, of satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24, 170, 210
old age Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 139, 140, 141
otho König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377
ovid Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 210
patronage Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113, 210
persius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113, 210
persona, satiric, conflicting impressions of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 170
persona, satiric, moral characterization of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 154
persona, satiric, need to objectify Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 121, 127
persona theory Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 18, 119, 120
philosophy, literary inspiration from Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 21, 148, 150
philosophy, relationship to satire Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
philosophy Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 118, 119, 144, 145
pity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 142
plato Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
pleasure, loss of with age Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 140
pleasure, of audiences Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60
plot, of satiric career Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24
plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 150
political careers Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 142
politics, in declamation Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 127, 137, 140
politics Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 118, 119, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 143, 210
poverty, as carefree Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 132
poverty Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113
prayer, sacrifice Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113, 144, 150, 151, 165, 166
prayer Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113, 119, 122, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145
proxy satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60, 113
pythagoras, curses Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 165, 166
quintilian König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 380
rhetoric as entertainment Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60
rhetorical education, controversiae and suasoriae Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 136, 137, 138, 139, 140
rhetorical education, juvenal’s evidenced Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 119, 128, 129, 130
rhetorical theory, emotion in Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60, 129
ribbeck, otto Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 117, 170
satire, present approach to Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
satire, relationship with philosophy' Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
satire König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 377
schnur, harry Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 210
sejanus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 121, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135
self-examination Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 148, 150, 151
self-fashioning König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 383
seneca the younger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 120, 130
shame Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 141
shamelessness Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 165
silius, gaius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 131, 132, 143
sirens Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 121
socio-literary interactions König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 383
sorrow, of aging Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 140, 141
sorrow, resistance to Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 123, 144
spectacle, political Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 118, 119, 122, 133, 134, 135
spectacle Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 113, 140
statues Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 121, 131, 132, 133
story, subject matter and persona Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 21, 170
sulla Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 128
sympathy Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 129
tiberius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 127, 131
trajan König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 382
tranquility Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 24, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 148, 150, 151, 154, 165, 166
umbricius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 60
varro, m. terentius, as author of saturae menippeae Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
xenophon Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20