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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7287
Justin, First Apology, 62-63


nanAnd the devils, indeed, having heard this washing published by the prophet, instigated those who enter their temples, and are about to approach them with libations and burnt-offerings, also to sprinkle themselves; and they cause them also to wash themselves entirely, as they depart [from the sacrifice], before they enter into the shrines in which their images are set. And the command, too, given by the priests to those who enter and worship in the temples, that they take off their shoes, the devils, learning what happened to the above-mentioned prophet Moses, have given in imitation of these things. For at that juncture, when Moses was ordered to go down into Egypt and lead out the people of the Israelites who were there, and while he was tending the flocks of his maternal uncle in the land of Arabia, our Christ conversed with him under the appearance of fire from a bush, and said, Put off your shoes, and draw near and hear. And he, when he had put off his shoes and drawn near, heard that he was to go down into Egypt and lead out the people of the Israelites there; and he received mighty power from Christ, who spoke to him in the appearance of fire, and went down and led out the people, having done great and marvellous things; which, if you desire to know, you will learn them accurately from his writings.


nanAnd all the Jews even now teach that the nameless God spoke to Moses; whence the Spirit of prophecy, accusing them by Isaiah the prophet mentioned above, said The ox knows his owner, and the ass his master's crib; but Israel does not know Me, and My people do not understand. Isaiah 1:3 And Jesus the Christ, because the Jews knew not what the Father was, and what the Son, in like manner accused them; and Himself said, No one knows the Father, but the Son; nor the Son, but the Father, and they to whom the Son reveals Him. Matthew 11:27 Now the Word of God is His Son, as we have before said. And He is called Angel and Apostle; for He declares whatever we ought to know, and is sent forth to declare whatever is revealed; as our Lord Himself says, He that hears Me, hears Him that sent Me. Luke 10:16 From the writings of Moses also this will be manifest; for thus it is written in them, And the Angel of God spoke to Moses, in a flame of fire out of the bush, and said, I am that I am, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob, the God of your fathers; go down into Egypt, and bring forth My people. Exodus 3:6 And if you wish to learn what follows, you can do so from the same writings; for it is impossible to relate the whole here. But so much is written for the sake of proving that Jesus the Christ is the Son of God and His Apostle, being of old the Word, and appearing sometimes in the form of fire, and sometimes in the likeness of angels; but now, by the will of God, having become man for the human race, He endured all the sufferings which the devils instigated the senseless Jews to inflict upon Him; who, though they have it expressly affirmed in the writings of Moses, And the angel of God spoke to Moses in a flame of fire in a bush, and said, I am that I am, the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, yet maintain that He who said this was the Father and Creator of the universe. Whence also the Spirit of prophecy rebukes them, and says, Israel does not know Me, my people have not understood Me. Isaiah 1:3 And again, Jesus, as we have already shown, while He was with them, said, No one knows the Father, but the Son; nor the Son but the Father, and those to whom the Son will reveal Him. Matthew 11:27 The Jews, accordingly, being throughout of opinion that it was the Father of the universe who spoke to Moses, though He who spoke to him was indeed the Son of God, who is called both Angel and Apostle, are justly charged, both by the Spirit of prophecy and by Christ Himself, with knowing neither the Father nor the Son. For they who affirm that the Son is the Father, are proved neither to have become acquainted with the Father, nor to know that the Father of the universe has a Son; who also, being the first-begotten Word of God, is even God. And of old He appeared in the shape of fire and in the likeness of an angel to Moses and to the other prophets; but now in the times of your reign, having, as we before said, become Man by a virgin, according to the counsel of the Father, for the salvation of those who believe in Him, He endured both to be set at nought and to suffer, that by dying and rising again He might conquer death. And that which was said out of the bush to Moses, I am that I am, the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, and the God of your fathers, Exodus 3:6 this signified that they, even though dead, are yet in existence, and are men belonging to Christ Himself. For they were the first of all men to busy themselves in the search after God; Abraham being the father of Isaac, and Isaac of Jacob, as Moses wrote.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 3, 2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Anon., 1 Enoch, 32.6 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

32.6. I said: 'How beautiful is the tree, and how attractive is its look!' Then Raphael the holy angel, who was with me, answered me and said: 'This is the tree of wisdom, of which thy father old (in years) and thy aged mother, who were before thee, have eaten, and they learnt wisdom and their eyes were opened, and they knew that they were naked and they were driven out of the garden.'
3. Anon., Epistle of Barnabas, 16.7-16.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.7. I find then that there is a temple, How then shall it be built in the name of the Lord? Understand ye. Before we believed on God, the abode of our heart was corrupt and weak, a temple truly built by hands; for it was full of idolatry and was a house of demons, because we did whatsoever was contrary to God. 16.8. But it shall be built in the name of the Lord. Give heed then that the temple of the Lord may be built gloriously. 16.9. How? Understand ye. By receiving the remission of our sins and hoping on the Name we became new, created afresh from the beginning. Wherefore God dwelleth truly in our habitation within us. How? The word of his faith, the calling of his promise, the wisdom of the ordices, the commandments of the teaching, He Himself prophesying in us, He Himself dwelling in us, opening for us who had been in bondage unto death the door of the temple, which is the mouth, and giving us repentance leadeth us to the incorruptible temple.
4. Anon., Didache, 13-14, 12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. But let every one that comes in the name of the Lord be received, and afterward you shall prove and know him; for you shall have understanding right and left. If he who comes is a wayfarer, assist him as far as you are able; but he shall not remain with you, except for two or three days, if need be. But if he wills to abide with you, being an artisan, let him work and eat; 2 Thessalonians 3:10 but if he has no trade, according to your understanding see to it that, as a Christian, he shall not live with you idle. But if he wills not to do, he is a Christ-monger. Watch that you keep aloof from such.
5. New Testament, 2 John, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. New Testament, 3 John, 9-10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. New Testament, Acts, 19.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19.9. But when some were hardened and disobedient, speaking evil of the Way before the multitude, he departed from them, and separated the disciples, reasoning daily in the school of Tyrannus.
8. Clement of Alexandria, Excerpts From Theodotus, 78.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Justin, First Apology, 18, 25, 27, 29, 43, 5, 54, 56, 58-59, 61, 63-67, 7, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Concerning chastity, He uttered such sentiments as these: Whosoever looks upon a woman to lust after her, has committed adultery with her already in his heart before God. And, If your right eye offend you, cut it out; for it is better for you to enter into the kingdom of heaven with one eye, than, having two eyes, to be cast into everlasting fire. And, Whosoever shall marry her that is divorced from another husband, commits adultery. And, There are some who have been made eunuchs of men, and some who were born eunuchs, and some who have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake; but all cannot receive this saying. Matthew 19:12 So that all who, by human law, are twice married, are in the eye of our Master sinners, and those who look upon a woman to lust after her. For not only he who in act commits adultery is rejected by Him, but also he who desires to commit adultery: since not only our works, but also our thoughts, are open before God. And many, both men and women, who have been Christ's disciples from childhood, remain pure at the age of sixty or seventy years; and I boast that I could produce such from every race of men. For what shall I say, too, of the countless multitude of those who have reformed intemperate habits, and learned these things? For Christ called not the just nor the chaste to repentance, but the ungodly, and the licentious, and the unjust; His words being, I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. Matthew 9:13 For the heavenly Father desires rather the repentance than the punishment of the sinner. And of our love to all, He taught thus: If you love them that love you, what new thing are you doing? For even fornicators do this. But I say unto you, Pray for your enemies, and love them that hate you, and bless them that curse you, and pray for them that despitefully use you. Matthew 5:46, 44; Luke 6:28 And that we should communicate to the needy, and do nothing for glory, He said, Give to him that asks, and from him that would borrow turn not away; for if you lend to them of whom you hope to receive, what new thing are you doing? Even the publicans do this. Lay not up for yourselves treasure upon earth, where moth and rust does corrupt, and where robbers break through; but lay up for yourselves treasure in heaven, where neither moth nor rust does corrupt. For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for it? Lay up treasure, therefore, in heaven, where neither moth nor rust does corrupt. And, Be kind and merciful, as your Father also is kind and merciful, and makes His sun to rise on sinners, and the righteous, and the wicked. Take no thought what you shall eat, or what you shall put on: are you not better than the birds and the beasts? And God feeds them. Take no thought, therefore, what you shall eat, or what you shall put on; for your heavenly Father knows that you have need of these things. But seek the kingdom of heaven, and all these things shall be added unto you. For where his treasure is, there also is the mind of a man. And, Do not these things to be seen of men; otherwise you have no reward from your Father which is in heaven. Matthew 6:1
10. Justin, Second Apology, 12, 2-3, 5, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. But neither should we be put to death, nor would wicked men and devils be more powerful than we, were not death a debt due by every man that is born. Wherefore we give thanks when we pay this debt. And we judge it right and opportune to tell here, for the sake of Crescens and those who rave as he does, what is related by Xenophon. Hercules, says Xenophon, coming to a place where three ways met, found Virtue and Vice, who appeared to him in the form of women: Vice, in a luxurious dress, and with a seductive expression rendered blooming by such ornaments, and her eyes of a quickly melting tenderness, said to Hercules that if he would follow her, she would always enable him to pass his life in pleasure and adorned with the most graceful ornaments, such as were then upon her own person; and Virtue, who was of squalid look and dress, said, But if you obey me, you shall adorn yourself not with ornament nor beauty that passes away and perishes, but with everlasting and precious graces. And we are persuaded that every one who flees those things that seem to be good, and follows hard after what are reckoned difficult and strange, enters into blessedness. For Vice, when by imitation of what is incorruptible (for what is really incorruptible she neither has nor can produce) she has thrown around her own actions, as a disguise, the properties of virtue, and qualities which are really excellent, leads captive earthly-minded men, attaching to Virtue her own evil properties. But those who understood the excellences which belong to that which is real, are also uncorrupt in virtue. And this every sensible person ought to think both of Christians and of the athletes, and of those who did what the poets relate of the so-called gods, concluding as much from our contempt of death, even when it could be escaped.
11. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1. While I was going about one morning in the walks of the Xystus, a certain man [Trypho], with others in his company, met me. Trypho: Hail, O philosopher! And immediately after saying this, he turned round and walked along with me; his friends likewise followed him. Justin: What is there important? Trypho: I was instructed by Corinthus the Socratic in Argos, that I ought not to despise or treat with indifference those who array themselves in this dress but to show them all kindness, and to associate with them, as perhaps some advantage would spring from the intercourse either to some such man or to myself. It is good, moreover, for both, if either the one or the other be benefited. On this account, therefore, whenever I see any one in such costume, I gladly approach him, and now, for the same reason, have I willingly accosted you; and these accompany me, in the expectation of hearing for themselves something profitable from you. Justin: (In jest.) But who are you, most excellent man? Then he told me frankly both his name and his family. Trypho: Trypho, I am called; and I am a Hebrew of the circumcision, and having escaped from the war lately carried on there I am spending my days in Greece, and chiefly at Corinth. Justin: And in what would you be profited by philosophy so much as by your own lawgiver and the prophets? Trypho: Why not? Do not the philosophers turn every discourse on God? And do not questions continually arise to them about His unity and providence? Is not this truly the duty of philosophy, to investigate the Deity? Justin: Assuredly, so we too have believed. But the most have not taken thought of this whether there be one or more gods, and whether they have a regard for each one of us or no, as if this knowledge contributed nothing to our happiness; nay, they moreover attempt to persuade us that God takes care of the universe with its genera and species, but not of me and you, and each individually, since otherwise we would surely not need to pray to Him night and day. But it is not difficult to understand the upshot of this; for fearlessness and license in speaking result to such as maintain these opinions, doing and saying whatever they choose, neither dreading punishment nor hoping for any benefit from God. For how could they? They affirm that the same things shall always happen; and, further, that I and you shall again live in like manner, having become neither better men nor worse. But there are some others, who, having supposed the soul to be immortal and immaterial, believe that though they have committed evil they will not suffer punishment (for that which is immaterial is insensible), and that the soul, in consequence of its immortality, needs nothing from God. Trypho: (Smiling gently.) Tell us your opinion of these matters, and what idea you entertain respecting God, and what your philosophy is.
12. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96, 10.96.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96, 10.96.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Tertullian, Against The Valentinians, 1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1. The Valentinians, who are no doubt a very large body of heretics- comprising as they do so many apostates from the truth, who have a propensity for fables, and no discipline to deter them (therefrom) care for nothing so much as to obscure what they preach, if indeed they (can be said to) preach who obscure their doctrine. The officiousness with which they guard their doctrine is an officiousness which betrays their guilt. Their disgrace is proclaimed in the very earnestness with which they maintain their religious system. Now, in the case of those Eleusinian mysteries, which are the very heresy of Athenian superstition, it is their secrecy that is their disgrace. Accordingly, they previously beset all access to their body with tormenting conditions; and they require a long initiation before they enrol (their members), even instruction during five years for their perfect disciples, in order that they may mould their opinions by this suspension of full knowledge, and apparently raise the dignity of their mysteries in proportion to the craving for them which they have previously created. Then follows the duty of silence. Carefully is that guarded, which is so long in finding. All the divinity, however, lies in their secret recesses: there are revealed at last all the aspirations of the fully initiated, the entire mystery of the sealed tongue, the symbol of virility. But this allegorical representation, under the pretext of nature's reverend name, obscures a real sacrilege by help of an arbitrary symbol, and by empty images obviates the reproach of falsehood! In like manner, the heretics who are now the object of our remarks, the Valentinians, have formed Eleusinian dissipations of their own, consecrated by a profound silence, having nothing of the heavenly in them but their mystery. By the help of the sacred names and titles and arguments of true religion, they have fabricated the vainest and foulest figment for men's pliant liking, out of the affluent suggestions of Holy Scripture, since from its many springs many errors may well emanate. If you propose to them inquiries sincere and honest, they answer you with stern look and contracted brow, and say, The subject is profound. If you try them with subtle questions, with the ambiguities of their double tongue, they affirm a community of faith (with yourself). If you intimate to them that you understand their opinions, they insist on knowing nothing themselves. If you come to a close engagement with them they destroy your own fond hope of a victory over them by a self-immolation. Not even to their own disciples do they commit a secret before they have made sure of them. They have the knack of persuading men before instructing them; although truth persuades by teaching, but does not teach by first persuading.
15. Tertullian, On Fasting, Against The Psychics, 9.1-9.6, 13.5, 16.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Porphyry, Life of Plotinus, 7 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adam, and christ Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
adam and eve, in geneology of error Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
adam and eve Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
alexandria Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
angel Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 121, 122
angelic sin, as epistemological transgression Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
apocalyptic literature, and book of daniel Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
apocalyptic literature, history of scholarship on Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
apology, apologetics, christian Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
architecture, from first century to early fourth century Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 710
architecture, generally Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 710
architecture, house-churches Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 710
baptism Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 117, 118, 121, 122
becker, e. m. Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
birth Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 118
body and soul Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 117, 118
book of the watchers, and etiology of evil Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
catechesis Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 122
christ Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
christianity, and greco-roman culture Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
christianity, attitudes towards jews in Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
church Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate, inherited catechetical practices from within early church Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate, secrecy of Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
clement of alexandria Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
creszens Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
cynics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
demonology, and magic Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
demonology, christian Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
demons, and pagan gods Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
demons, pagan enslavement to Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
demons and baptism Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 118, 121, 122
dietary laws ascetic role of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 118
divorce Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
dogs Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 117
educated, erudite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267, 417
education Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
egypt alexandria Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
enochic literary tradition, place of book of dreams in Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
epicurean Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
ethics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
evil, problem of Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
fallen angels, and pagan gods Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
fasting Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 122
fasts/fasti Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
gabe, mitteilung Hellholm et al., Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity (2010) 1400
general education Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
genesis, and book of the watchers Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
hadrian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
heart purity and impurity of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 121
hercules (heracles) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
house-church, architecture Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 710
idolatry, as linked to fallen angels and demons Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
idolatry Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 121
intention Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 122
intermarriage Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
invocation Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 122
justin Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267, 417
justin martyr, on catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
justin martyr Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222; Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
knowledge, revealed Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
knowledge Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 121, 122
lang, t. j. Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
le Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
light Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 121, 122
literary production Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
marcion Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
marcion and marcionites Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
matter (material substance/existence) Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
mutterschoƟ Hellholm et al., Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity (2010) 1409
mysteries Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
noah Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
novelty (charge of ) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
oracles/sayings logia (montanist) Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
oracles Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
origen Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
paganism/paganists Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
penance, penitence Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 117
persecutions Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
philosophy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
platonism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
pliny the younger Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
pneumatic humans/powers Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
polytheism Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
prayer Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 122
psychic humans/powers Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
psychici Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
pythagoreans Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
rebirth Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 121
repentance Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 117, 118, 121, 122
rights, individual Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
sacred and profane Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 117
salbung(en) Hellholm et al., Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity (2010) 1400
san clemente Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 710
school Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
seminal emissions Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 118
sin, human culpability for Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 166
soul Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
spirit pneuma Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
sprinkling Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 118
statio, stationes Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
stoicism, stoics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 417
tatian and celsus, education of christians and Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
taxes Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
teacher Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
tertullian, on catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
tertullian Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148
titular churches Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 710
valentinian/valentinians Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
valentinus Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 222
valentinus and valentinians Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 107
washing after sexual intercourse Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 118
water types of Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 117, 118
wiedergeburt Hellholm et al., Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity (2010) 1400, 1409
women Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 267
xerophagy/xerophagies' Tabbernee, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism (2007) 148