Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7289
Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 2.4
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

179e. THEO. Certainly we must. For it is no more possible, Socrates, to discuss these doctrines of Heracleitus (or, as you say, of Homer or even earlier sages) with the Ephesians themselves—those, at least, who profess to be familiar with them—than with madmen. For they are, quite in accordance with their text-books, in perpetual motion; but as for keeping to an argument or a question and quietly answering and asking in turn
2. Epictetus, Discourses, 3.23.30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. New Testament, Acts, 28.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28.29. When he had said these words, the Jews departed, having a great dispute among themselves.
4. New Testament, Matthew, 24.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24.5. For many will come in my name, saying, 'I am the Christ,' and will lead many astray.
5. Alcinous, Handbook of Platonism, 30.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 2.13.56.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Gellius, Attic Nights, 15.2.2, 15.2.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Hermas, Mandates, 11.12-11.14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Hippolytus, Apostolic Tradition, 16-20, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.4.3, 1.8, 1.11.1, 1.28.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.8. Archelaus was by birth an Athenian, and son of Apollodorus. This person, similarly with Anaxagoras, asserted the mixture of matter, and enunciated his first principles in the same manner. This philosopher, however, held that there is inherent immediately in mind a certain mixture; and that the originating principle of motion is the mutual separation of heat and cold, and that the heat is moved, and that the cold remains at rest. And that the water, being dissolved, flows towards the centre, where the scorched air and earth are produced, of which the one is borne upwards and the other remains beneath. And that the earth is at rest, and that on this account it came into existence; and that it lies in the centre, being no part, so to speak, of the universe, delivered from the conflagration; and that from this, first in a state of ignition, is the nature of the stars, of which indeed the largest is the sun, and next to this the moon; and of the rest some less, but some greater. And he says that the heaven was inclined at an angle, and so that the sun diffused light over the earth, and made the atmosphere transparent, and the ground dry; for that at first it was a sea, inasmuch as it is lofty at the horizon and hollow in the middle. And he adduces, as an indication of the hollowness, that the sun does not rise and set to all at the same time, which ought to happen if the earth was even. And with regard to animals, he affirms that the earth, being originally fire in its lower part, where the heat and cold were intermingled, both the rest of animals made their appearance, numerous and dissimilar, all having the same food, being nourished from mud; and their existence was of short duration, but afterwards also generation from one another arose unto them; and men were separated from the rest (of the animal creation), and they appointed rulers, and laws, and arts, and cities, and the rest. And he asserts that mind is innate in all animals alike; for that each, according to the difference of their physical constitution, employed (mind), at one time slower, at another faster. Natural philosophy, then, continued from Thales until Archelaus. Socrates was the hearer of this (latter philosopher). There are, however, also very many others, introducing various opinions respecting both the divinity and the nature of the universe; and if we were disposed to adduce all the opinions of these, it would be necessary to compose a vast quantity of books. But, reminding the reader of those whom we especially ought - who are deserving of mention from their fame, and from being, so to speak, the leaders to those who have subsequently framed systems of philosophy, and from their supplying them with a starting-point towards such undertakings - let us hasten on our investigations towards what remains for consideration.
12. Justin, First Apology, 14.3, 31.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. But we have received by tradition that God does not need the material offerings which men can give, seeing, indeed, that He Himself is the provider of all things. And we have been taught, and are convinced, and do believe, that He accepts those only who imitate the excellences which reside in Him, temperance, and justice, and philanthropy, and as many virtues as are peculiar to a God who is called by no proper name. And we have been taught that He in the beginning did of His goodness, for man's sake, create all things out of unformed matter; and if men by their works show themselves worthy of this His design, they are deemed worthy, and so we have received - of reigning in company with Him, being delivered from corruption and suffering. For as in the beginning He created us when we were not, so do we consider that, in like manner, those who choose what is pleasing to Him are, on account of their choice, deemed worthy of incorruption and of fellowship with Him. For the coming into being at first was not in our own power; and in order that we may follow those things which please Him, choosing them by means of the rational faculties He has Himself endowed us with, He both persuades us and leads us to faith. And we think it for the advantage of all men that they are not restrained from learning these things, but are even urged thereto. For the restraint which human laws could not effect, the Word, inasmuch as He is divine, would have effected, had not the wicked demons, taking as their ally the lust of wickedness which is in every man, and which draws variously to all manner of vice, scattered many false and profane accusations, none of which attach to us.
13. Justin, Second Apology, 8.1, 10.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 1.2, 1.4, 2.1-2.3, 2.5-2.6, 3.3-3.4, 4.1-4.3, 4.7, 5.6, 7.1, 8.1-8.2, 35.4, 46.7, 58.1, 69.3, 82.2, 142.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1. While I was going about one morning in the walks of the Xystus, a certain man [Trypho], with others in his company, met me. Trypho: Hail, O philosopher! And immediately after saying this, he turned round and walked along with me; his friends likewise followed him. Justin: What is there important? Trypho: I was instructed by Corinthus the Socratic in Argos, that I ought not to despise or treat with indifference those who array themselves in this dress but to show them all kindness, and to associate with them, as perhaps some advantage would spring from the intercourse either to some such man or to myself. It is good, moreover, for both, if either the one or the other be benefited. On this account, therefore, whenever I see any one in such costume, I gladly approach him, and now, for the same reason, have I willingly accosted you; and these accompany me, in the expectation of hearing for themselves something profitable from you. Justin: (In jest.) But who are you, most excellent man? Then he told me frankly both his name and his family. Trypho: Trypho, I am called; and I am a Hebrew of the circumcision, and having escaped from the war lately carried on there I am spending my days in Greece, and chiefly at Corinth. Justin: And in what would you be profited by philosophy so much as by your own lawgiver and the prophets? Trypho: Why not? Do not the philosophers turn every discourse on God? And do not questions continually arise to them about His unity and providence? Is not this truly the duty of philosophy, to investigate the Deity? Justin: Assuredly, so we too have believed. But the most have not taken thought of this whether there be one or more gods, and whether they have a regard for each one of us or no, as if this knowledge contributed nothing to our happiness; nay, they moreover attempt to persuade us that God takes care of the universe with its genera and species, but not of me and you, and each individually, since otherwise we would surely not need to pray to Him night and day. But it is not difficult to understand the upshot of this; for fearlessness and license in speaking result to such as maintain these opinions, doing and saying whatever they choose, neither dreading punishment nor hoping for any benefit from God. For how could they? They affirm that the same things shall always happen; and, further, that I and you shall again live in like manner, having become neither better men nor worse. But there are some others, who, having supposed the soul to be immortal and immaterial, believe that though they have committed evil they will not suffer punishment (for that which is immaterial is insensible), and that the soul, in consequence of its immortality, needs nothing from God. Trypho: (Smiling gently.) Tell us your opinion of these matters, and what idea you entertain respecting God, and what your philosophy is.
15. Lucian, Nigrinus, 38, 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1. Fr. What a haughty and dignified Lucian returns to us from his journey! He will not vouchsafe us a glance; he stands aloof, and will hold no further communion with us. Altogether a supercilious Lucian! The change is sudden. Might one inquire the cause of this altered demeanour?Luc. ’Tis the work of Fortune.Fr. of Fortune!Luc. As an incidental result of my journey, you see in me a happy man; ‘thrice blest,’ as the tragedians have it.Fr. Dear me. What, in this short time?Luc. Even so.Fr. But what does it all mean? What is the secret of your elation? I decline to rejoice with you in this abridged fashion; I must have details. Tell me all about it.Luc. What should you think, if I told you that I had exchanged servitude for freedom; poverty for true wealth; folly and presumption for good sense?
16. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.20 (2nd cent. CE

4.20. Now while he was discussing the question of libations, there chanced to be present in his audience a young dandy who bore so evil a reputation for licentiousness that his conduct had long been the subject of coarse street-corner songs. His home was Corcyra, and he traced his pedigree to Alcinous the Phaeacian who entertained Odysseus. Apollonius then was talking about libations, and was urging them not to drink out of a particular cup, but to reserve it for the gods, without ever touching it or drinking out of it. But when he also urged them to have handles on the cup, and to pour the libation over the handle, because that is the part at which men are least likely to drink, the youth burst out into loud and coarse laughter, and quite drowned his voice. Then Apollonius looked up and said: It is not yourself that perpetrates this insult, but the demon, who drives you without your knowing it. And in fact the youth was, without knowing it, possessed by a devil; for he would laugh at things that no one else laughed at, and then would fall to weeping for no reason at all, and he would talk and sing to himself. Now most people thought that it was boisterous humor of youth which led him into excesses; but he was really the mouthpiece of a devil, though it only seemed a drunken frolic in which on that occasion he was indulging. Now, when Apollonius gazed on him, the ghost in him began to utter cries of fear and rage, such as one hears from people who are being branded or racked; and the ghost swore that he would leave the you man alone and never take possession of any man again. But Apollonius addressed him with anger, as a master might a shifty, rascally, and shameless slave and so on, and he ordered him to quit the young man and show by a visible sign that he had done so. I will throw down yonder statue, said the devil, and pointed to one of the images which were there in the Royal Stoa, for there it was that the scene took place. But when the statue began by moving gently, and then fell down, it would defy anyone to describe the hubbub which arose thereat and the way they clapped their hand with wonder. But the young man rubbed his eyes as if he had just woke up, and he looked towards the rays of the sun, and assumed a modest aspect, as all had their attention concentrated on him; for he no longer showed himself licentious, nor did he stare madly about, but he had returned to his own self, as thoroughly as if he had been treated with drugs; and he gave up his dainty dress and summery garments and the rest of his sybaritic way of life, and he fell in love with the austerity of philosophers, and donned their cloak, and stripping off his old self modeled his life and future upon that of Apollonius.
17. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 32, 19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Tertullian, Apology, 28, 35, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. You do not worship the gods, you say; and you do not offer sacrifices for the emperors. Well, we do not offer sacrifice for others, for the same reason that we do not for ourselves - namely, that your gods are not at all the objects of our worship. So we are accused of sacrilege and treason. This is the chief ground of charge against us - nay, it is the sum-total of our offending; and it is worthy then of being inquired into, if neither prejudice nor injustice be the judge, the one of which has no idea of discovering the truth, and the other simply and at once rejects it. We do not worship your gods, because we know that there are no such beings. This, therefore, is what you should do: you should call on us to demonstrate their non-existence, and thereby prove that they have no claim to adoration; for only if your gods were truly so, would there be any obligation to render divine homage to them. And punishment even were due to Christians, if it were made plain that those to whom they refused all worship were indeed divine. But you say, They are gods. We protest and appeal from yourselves to your knowledge; let that judge us; let that condemn us, if it can deny that all these gods of yours were but men. If even it venture to deny that, it will be confuted by its own books of antiquities, from which it has got its information about them, bearing witness to this day, as they plainly do, both of the cities in which they were born, and the countries in which they have left traces of their exploits, as well as where also they are proved to have been buried. Shall I now, therefore, go over them one by one, so numerous and so various, new and old, barbarian, Grecian, Roman, foreign, captive and adopted, private and common, male and female, rural and urban, naval and military? It were useless even to hunt out all their names: so I may content myself with a compend; and this not for your information, but that you may have what you know brought to your recollection, for undoubtedly you act as if you had forgotten all about them. No one of your gods is earlier than Saturn: from him you trace all your deities, even those of higher rank and better known. What, then, can be proved of the first, will apply to those that follow. So far, then, as books give us information, neither the Greek Diodorus or Thallus, neither Cassius Severus or Cornelius Nepos, nor any writer upon sacred antiquities, have ventured to say that Saturn was any but a man: so far as the question depends on facts, I find none more trustworthy than those- that in Italy itself we have the country in which, after many expeditions, and after having partaken of Attic hospitalities, Saturn settled, obtaining cordial welcome from Janus, or, as the Salii will have it, Janis. The mountain on which he dwelt was called Saturnius; the city he founded is called Saturnia to this day; last of all, the whole of Italy, after having borne the name of Oenotria, was called Saturnia from him. He first gave you the art of writing, and a stamped coinage, and thence it is he presides over the public treasury. But if Saturn were a man, he had undoubtedly a human origin; and having a human origin, he was not the offspring of heaven and earth. As his parents were unknown, it was not unnatural that he should be spoken of as the son of those elements from which we might all seem to spring. For who does not speak of heaven and earth as father and mother, in a sort of way of veneration and honour? Or from the custom which prevails among us of saying that persons of whom we have no knowledge, or who make a sudden appearance, have fallen from the skies? In this way it came about that Saturn, everywhere a sudden and unlooked-for, got everywhere the name of the Heaven-born. For even the common folk call persons whose stock is unknown, sons of earth. I say nothing of how men in these rude times were wont to act, when they were impressed by the look of any stranger happening to appear among them, as though it were divine, since even at this day men of culture make gods of those whom, a day or two before, they acknowledged to be dead men by their public mourning for them. Let these notices of Saturn, brief as they are, suffice. It will thus also be proved that Jupiter is as certainly a man, as from a man he sprung; and that one after another the whole swarm is mortal like the primal stock.
19. Tertullian, On Repentance, 6.20 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

20. Tertullian, On The Pallium, 5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Still, say you, must we thus change from gown to Mantle? Why, what if from diadem and sceptre? Did Anacharsis change otherwise, when to the royalty of Scythia he preferred philosophy? Grant that there be no (miraculous) signs in proof of your transformation for the better: there is somewhat which this your garb can do. For, to begin with the simplicity of its uptaking: it needs no tedious arrangement. Accordingly, there is no necessity for any artist formally to dispose its wrinkled folds from the beginning a day beforehand, and then to reduce them to a more finished elegance, and to assign to the guardianship of the stretchers the whole figment of the massed boss; subsequently, at daybreak, first gathering up by the aid of a girdle the tunic which it were better to have woven of more moderate length (in the first instance), and, again scrutinizing the boss, and rearranging any disarrangement, to make one part prominent on the left, but (making now an end of the folds) to draw backwards from the shoulders the circuit of it whence the hollow is formed, and, leaving the right shoulder free, heap it still upon the left, with another similar set of folds reserved for the back, and thus clothe the man with a burden! In short, I will persistently ask your own conscience, What is your first sensation in wearing your gown? Do you feel yourself clad, or laded? Wearing a garment, or carrying it? If you shall answer negatively, I will follow you home; I win see what you hasten to do immediately after crossing your threshold. There is really no garment the doffing whereof congratulates a man more than the gown's does. of shoes we say nothing - implements as they are of torture proper to the gown, most uncleanly protection to the feet, yes, and false too. For who would not find it expedient, in cold and heat, to stiffen with feet bare rather than in a shoe with feet bound? A mighty munition for the tread have the Venetian shoe-factories provided in the shape of effeminate boots! Well, but, than the Mantle nothing is more expedite, even if it be double, like that of Crates. Nowhere is there a compulsory waste of time in dressing yourself (in it), seeing that its whole art consists in loosely covering. That can be effected by a single circumjection, and one in no case inelegant: thus it wholly covers every part of the man at once. The shoulder it either exposes or encloses: in other respects it adheres to the shoulder; it has no surrounding support; it has no surrounding tie; it has no anxiety as to the fidelity with which its folds keep their place; easily it manages, easily readjusts itself: even in the doffing it is consigned to no cross until the morrow. If any shirt is worn beneath it, the torment of a girdle is superfluous: if anything in the way of shoeing is worn, it is a most cleanly work; or else the feet are rather bare - more manly, at all events, (if bare,) than in shoes. These (pleas I advance) for the Mantle in the meantime, in so far as you have defamed it by name. Now, however, it challenges you on the score of its function withal. I, it says, owe no duty to the forum, the election-ground, or the senate-house; I keep no obsequious vigil, preoccupy no platforms, hover about no pr torian residences; I am not odorant of the canals, am not odorant of the lattices, am no constant wearer out of benches, no wholesale router of laws, no barking pleader, no judge, no soldier, no king: I have withdrawn from the populace. My only business is with myself: except that other care I have none, save not to care. The better life you would more enjoy in seclusion than in publicity. But you will decry me as indolent. Forsooth, 'we are to live for our country, and empire, and estate.' Such used, of old, to be the sentiment. None is born for another, being destined to die for himself. At all events, when we come to the Epicuri and Zenones, you give the epithet of 'sages' to the whole teacherhood of Quietude, who have consecrated that Quietude with the name of 'supreme' and 'unique' pleasure. Still, to some extent it will be allowed, even to me, to confer benefit on the public. From any and every boundary-stone or altar it is my wont to prescribe medicines to morals - medicines which will be more felicitous in conferring good health upon public affairs, and states, and empires, than your works are. Indeed, if I proceed to encounter you with naked foils, gowns have done the commonwealth more hurt than cuirasses. Moreover, I flatter no vices; I give quarter to no lethargy, no slothful encrustation. I apply the cauterizing iron to the ambition which led M. Tullius to buy a circular table of citron-wood for more than £4000, and Asinius Gallus to pay twice as much for an ordinary table of the same Moorish wood (Hem! At what fortunes did they value woody dapplings!), or, again, Sulla to frame dishes of an hundred pounds' weight. I fear lest that balance be small, when a Drusillanus (and he withal a slave of Claudius!) constructs a tray of the weight of 500 lbs.!- a tray indispensable, perchance, to the aforesaid tables, for which, if a workshop was erected, there ought to have been erected a dining-room too. Equally do I plunge the scalpel into the inhumanity which led Vedius Pollio to expose slaves to fill the bellies of sea-eels. Delighted, forsooth, with his novel savagery, he kept land-monsters, toothless, clawless, hornless: it was his pleasure to turn perforce into wild beasts his fish, which (of course) were to be immediately cooked, that in their entrails he himself withal might taste some savour of the bodies of his own slaves. I will forelop the gluttony which led Hortensius the orator to be the first to have the heart to slay a peacock for the sake of food; which led Aufidius Lurco to be the first to vitiate meat with stuffing, and by the aid of forcemeats to raise them to an adulterous flavour; which led Asinius Celer to purchase the viand of a single mullet at nearly £50; which led Æsopus the actor to preserve in his pantry a dish of the value of nearly £800, made up of birds of the selfsame costliness (as the mullet aforesaid), consisting of all the songsters and talkers; which led his son, after such a titbit, to have the hardihood to hunger after somewhat yet more sumptuous: for he swallowed down pearls - costly even on the ground of their name - I suppose for fear he should have supped more beggarly than his father. I am silent as to the Neros and Apicii and Rufi. I will give a cathartic to the impurity of a Scaurus, and the gambling of a Curius, and the intemperance of an Antony. And remember that these, out of the many (whom I have named), were men of the toga - such as among the men of the pallium you would not easily find. These purulencies of a state who will eliminate and exsuppurate, save a bemantled speech?
21. Cyprian, Testimoniorum Libri Tres Adversus Judaeos (Ad Quirinum), 3.98 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

22. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.17-1.19, 2.48, 2.65, 4.16, 6.8, 7.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.48. 6. XENOPHONXenophon, the son of Gryllus, was a citizen of Athens and belonged to the deme Erchia; he was a man of rare modesty and extremely handsome. The story goes that Socrates met him in a narrow passage, and that he stretched out his stick to bar the way, while he inquired where every kind of food was sold. Upon receiving a reply, he put another question, And where do men become good and honourable? Xenophon was fairly pu2led; Then follow me, said Socrates, and learn. From that time onward he was a pupil of Socrates. He was the first to take notes of, and to give to the world, the conversation of Socrates, under the title of Memorabilia. Moreover, he was the first to write a history of philosophers.Aristippus, in the fourth book of his work On the Luxury of the Ancients, declares that he was enamoured of Clinias 2.65. 8. ARISTIPPUSAristippus was by birth a citizen of Cyrene and, as Aeschines informs us, was drawn to Athens by the fame of Socrates. Having come forward as a lecturer or sophist, as Phanias of Eresus, the Peripatetic, informs us, he was the first of the followers of Socrates to charge fees and to send money to his master. And on one occasion the sum of twenty minae which he had sent was returned to him, Socrates declaring that the supernatural sign would not let him take it; the very offer, in fact, annoyed him. Xenophon was no friend to Aristippus; and for this reason he has made Socrates direct against Aristippus the discourse in which he denounces pleasure. Not but what Theodorus in his work On Sects abuses him, and so does Plato in the dialogue On the Soul, as has been shown elsewhere. 4.16. 3. POLEMOPolemo, the son of Philostratus, was an Athenian who belonged to the deme of Oea. In his youth he was so profligate and dissipated that he actually carried about with him money to procure the immediate gratification of his desires, and would even keep sums concealed in lanes and alleys. Even in the Academy a piece of three obols was found close to a pillar, where he had buried it for the same purpose. And one day, by agreement with his young friends, he burst into the school of Xenocrates quite drunk, with a garland on his head. Xenocrates, however, without being at all disturbed, went on with his discourse as before, the subject being temperance. The lad, as he listened, by degrees was taken in the toils. He became so industrious as to surpass all the other scholars, and rose to be himself head of the school in the 116th Olympiad. 6.8. He used to recommend the Athenians to vote that asses are horses. When they deemed this absurd, his reply was, But yet generals are found among you who had had no training, but were merely elected. Many men praise you, said one. Why, what wrong have I done? was his rejoinder. When he turned the torn part of his cloak so that it came into view, Socrates no sooner saw this than he said, I spy your love of fame peeping through your cloak. Phanias in his work on the Socratics tells us how some one asked him what he must do to be good and noble, and he replied, You must learn from those who know that the faults you have are to be avoided. When some one extolled luxury his reply was, May the sons of your enemies live in luxury. 7.2. He was a pupil of Crates, as stated above. Next they say he attended the lectures of Stilpo and Xenocrates for ten years – so Timocrates says in his Dion – and Polemo as well. It is stated by Hecato and by Apollonius of Tyre in his first book on Zeno that he consulted the oracle to know what he should do to attain the best life, and that the god's response was that he should take on the complexion of the dead. Whereupon, perceiving what this meant, he studied ancient authors. Now the way he came across Crates was this. He was shipwrecked on a voyage from Phoenicia to Peiraeus with a cargo of purple. He went up into Athens and sat down in a bookseller's shop, being then a man of thirty.
23. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.18.2, 4.18.6-4.18.8 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.18.2. There is a certain discourse of his in defense of our doctrine addressed to Antoninus surnamed the Pious, and to his sons, and to the Roman senate. Another work contains his second Apology in behalf of our faith, which he offered to him who was the successor of the emperor mentioned and who bore the same name, Antoninus Verus, the one whose times we are now recording. 4.18.6. He composed also a dialogue against the Jews, which he held in the city of Ephesus with Trypho, a most distinguished man among the Hebrews of that day. In it he shows how the divine grace urged him on to the doctrine of the faith, and with what earnestness he had formerly pursued philosophical studies, and how ardent a search he had made for the truth. 4.18.7. And he records of the Jews in the same work, that they were plotting against the teaching of Christ, asserting the same things against Trypho: Not only did you not repent of the wickedness which you had committed, but you selected at that time chosen men, and you sent them out from Jerusalem through all the land, to announce that the godless heresy of the Christians had made its appearance, and to accuse them of those things which all that are ignorant of us say against us, so that you become the causes not only of your own injustice, but also of all other men's. 4.18.8. He writes also that even down to his time prophetic gifts shone in the Church. And he mentions the Apocalypse of John, saying distinctly that it was the apostle's. He also refers to certain prophetic declarations, and accuses Trypho on the ground that the Jews had cut them out of the Scripture. A great many other works of his are still in the hands of many of the brethren.
24. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 24.107, 28.150 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
age Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
alexandria, platonism and stoicism in, on intellectual independence Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
animals Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 420
apollonius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257
apostles disciples Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
apostolic tradition, on catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
aristotelianism, as school Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
asclepius, justin martyr on christ and Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 51
baptism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 421
belief Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123, 124, 262
blasphemy, heresy as Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
choice will Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
christ, asclepius compared Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 51
christianity, convert Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
church Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate, inherited catechetical practices from within early church Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
clement of alexandria, on the catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
conversion Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
cosmos, cosmology, nature Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 421, 423
cosmos, cosmology Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123
creszens Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 275
death Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 262
demiurge Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 420
dialectic Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 421
dialogues (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
educated, erudite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257, 258, 275, 278, 283, 420, 421, 423
education, catechesis Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 262
education, disciples Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
education, philosophical schools Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123
education, teachers Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 262
education Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123, 262
elite Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
epicurean Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 423
epicureanism, as school or sect Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42, 43
ethics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 275, 283, 420, 421, 423; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
eudoros Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 420
example, of philosopher Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
family, marriage Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
flavia neapolis Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257
galen., commentary on platos republic Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
galen., on christianity Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84, 105
galen., on intellectual independence Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
galen., on the primary unmoved mover Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
galens commentary on republic Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
gnosticism Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
god, concept of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 421, 423
god, direct contemplation of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258, 421
goetes, religious charlatans/fraud Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
grammatikoi, schools of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 283
groups, group formation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123
hairesis, as referring to philosophical schools Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42, 43
hairesis, pre-christian use Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42, 43
happiness, eudaimonia Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123, 124
happiness Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123, 124
health, medicine, and philosophy in school of justin martyr, justins self-presentation as philosopher and Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 51
health, medicine, and philosophy in school of justin martyr Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 51
hearers, catechumens as Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
heresy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123
heresy heterodoxy Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
identity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123, 262
individual, options Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123, 124
individual Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
individuality Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123
initiation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
intellectual independence, galen and medical discourse on Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
intellectual independence, loyalty to teachers/schools and Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
intellectual independence Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
irenaeus Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
jesus christ, savior, and son Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
jews, jewish tradition Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 262
justin Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257, 258, 275, 278, 283, 420, 421, 423; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 262
justin martyr, on catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
justin martyr, on intellectual independence Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
justin martyr. see also health, medicine, and philosophy in school of justin martyr, dialogue with trypho Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 51
justin martyr Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
knowledge, of divinity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123
knowledge, self Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123
knowledge, truth Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124, 262
knowledge Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123, 124
lese-majeste Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 278
logos, doctrine of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 423
logos Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 262
marcion Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 420, 421, 423
marcus aurelius (emperor) Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 51
martyr, justin, naming sects Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42, 43
martyrs Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 262
medicine and medical discourse, intellectual independence and Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
mind Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
modernity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
monism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 423
nigrinus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 275
on the primary unmoved mover (galen) Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
palestine Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258
perception Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124, 262
peripatetic Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123, 262
peripatetics Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84; Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257, 278, 421, 423
persecution, martyrs Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257, 258, 278
person, personal religiosity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
person, personality Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 262
person Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123
philosopher's mantle" '186.0_420.0@philosophy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 283
philosophy, origin of notion of αἵρεσις Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42, 43
philosophy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 421, 423
physics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 421
plato Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
platonism, as a label Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42, 43
platonism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258, 275, 420, 421, 423; Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
platonists Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
pleasure Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
polemics Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
polemo Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
power Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
preaching Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
propaedeutic Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257, 258
prophecy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 278
prophets, prophecy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
protrepsis/protreptic Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
provincials, immigrants Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257, 258
pythagoras, pythagorean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
pythagoreans Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 257, 258, 420, 421, 423
republic (plato), galens commentary on Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
responsibility, understanding of Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 262
rhetoric Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
rome, cultural tradition Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123
rusticus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 275, 278
sacred texts Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
sacrifices Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 278
sage Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
school Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
schools Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 278, 283
self-awareness Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123, 124, 262
selfhood Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 123
senator, senatorial Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 283
shepherd of hermas Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
slaves, slavery Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 278
socially elevated Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 283
sophists Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105
soteriology, salvation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
soteriology, saviour Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
soul Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 420, 421; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 124
specific christian intellectuals, intellectual independence in Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 84
stoicism, moral progress Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
stoicism, notion of a stoic school or αἵρεσις Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
stoicism, stoic views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123, 262
stoicism, stoics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 275, 421, 423
stoicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
teachers Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 278, 283
tertullian, on catechumenate Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
topos, topoi Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
trials Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 258, 278
tryphon Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 262
valentinian/valentinians Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
valentinus Linjamaa, The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics (2019) 218
valentinus and valentinians Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 105
weapon Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
wisdom Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105, 123, 124
word/the word, of jesus Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
world, indestructibility of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 420
world conflagrations Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 423
worship Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 278
xenocrates' Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 420
xenocrates, polemos conversion Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 225
γνώμη Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
διαδοχή Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
διατριβή Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
διδαχή Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
σχολή Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 42
− in christian context Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 124
− religious, individualism Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 105