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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7289
Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 120.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

29. They have also writings of ancient men, who having been the founders of one sect or another have left behind them many memorials of the allegorical system of writing and explanation, whom they take as a kind of model, and imitate the general fashion of their sect; so that they do not occupy themselves solely in contemplation, but they likewise compose psalms and hymns to God in every kind of metre and melody imaginable, which they of necessity arrange in more dignified rhythm.
2. New Testament, Acts, 8.10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.10. to whom they all listened, from the least to the greatest, saying, "This man is that great power of God.
3. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.21. far above all rule, and authority, and power, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come.
4. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 12.2, 13.1, 17.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12.2. 2 When this had been said by the herald, all the multitude of heathen and Jews living in Smyrna cried out with uncontrollable wrath and a loud shout: "This is the teacher of Asia, the father of the Christians, the destroyer of our Gods, who teaches many neither to offer sacrifice nor to worship." And when they said this, they cried out and asked Philip the Asiarch to let loose a lion on Polycarp. But he said he could not legally do this, since he had closed the Sports. 13.1. 1 These things then happened with so great speed, quicker than it takes to tell, and the crowd came together immediately, and prepared wood and faggots from the work-shops and baths and the Jews were extremely zealous, as is their custom, in assisting at this. 17.2. 2 Therefore he put forward Niketas, the father of Herod, and the brother of Alce, to ask the Governor not to give his body, "Lest," he said, "they leave the crucified one and begin to worship this man." And they said this owing to the suggestions and pressure of the Jews, who also watched when we were going to take it from the fire, for they do not know that we shall not ever be able either to abandon Christ, who suffered for the salvation of those who are being saved in the whole world, the innocent for sinners, or to worship any other.
5. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.13-1.16, 1.23-1.27, 1.23.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.13. One Ecphantus, a native of Syracuse, affirmed that it is not possible to attain a true knowledge of things. He defines, however, as he thinks, primary bodies to be indivisible, and that there are three variations of these, viz., bulk, figure, capacity, from which are generated the objects of sense. But that there is a determinable multitude of these, and that this is infinite. And that bodies are moved neither by weight nor by impact, but by divine power, which he calls mind and soul; and that of this the world is a representation; wherefore also it has been made in the form of a sphere by divine power. And that the earth in the middle of the cosmical system is moved round its own centre towards the east. 1.14. Hippo, a native of Rhegium, asserted as originating principles, coldness, for instance water, and heat, for instance fire. And that fire, when produced by water, subdued the power of its generator, and formed the world. And the soul, he said, is sometimes brain, but sometimes water; for that also the seed is that which appears to us to arise out of moisture, from which, he says, the soul is produced. So far, then, we think we have sufficiently adduced (the opinions of) these; wherefore, inasmuch as we have adequately gone in review through the tenets of physical speculators, it seems to remain that we now turn to Socrates and Plato, who gave special preference to moral philosophy. 1.15. Socrates, then, was a hearer of Archelaus, the natural philosopher; and he, reverencing the rule, Know yourself, and having assembled a large school, had Plato (there), who was far superior to all his pupils. (Socrates) himself left no writings after him. Plato, however, taking notes of all his (lectures on) wisdom, established a school, combining together natural, ethical, (and) logical (philosophy). But the points Plato determined are these following. 1.16. Plato (lays down) that there are three originating principles of the universe, (namely) God, and matter, and exemplar; God as the Maker and Regulator of this universe, and the Being who exercises providence over it; but matter, as that which underlies all (phenomena), which (matter) he styles both receptive and a nurse, out of the arrangement of which proceeded the four elements of which the world consists; (I mean) fire, air, earth, water, from which all the rest of what are denominated concrete substances, as well as animals and plants, have been formed. And that the exemplar, which he likewise calls ideas, is the intelligence of the Deity, to which, as to an image in the soul, the Deity attending, fabricated all things. God, he says, is both incorporeal and shapeless, and comprehensible by wise men solely; whereas matter is body potentially, but with potentiality not as yet passing into action, for being itself without form and without quality, by assuming forms and qualities, it became body. That matter, therefore, is an originating principle, and coeval with the Deity, and that in this respect the world is uncreated. For (Plato) affirms that (the world) was made out of it. And that (the attribute of) imperishableness necessarily belongs to (literally follows) that which is uncreated. So far forth, however, as body is supposed to be compounded out of both many qualities and ideas, so far forth it is both created and perishable. But some of the followers of Plato mingled both of these, employing some such example as the following: That as a waggon can always continue undestroyed, though undergoing partial repairs from time to time, so that even the parts each in turn perish, yet itself remains always complete; so after this manner the world also, although in parts it perishes, yet the things that are removed, being repaired, and equivalents for them being introduced, it remains eternal. Some maintain that Plato asserts the Deity to be one, ingenerable and incorruptible, as he says in The Laws: God, therefore, as the ancient account has it, possesses both the beginning, and end, and middle of all things. Thus he shows God to be one, on account of His having pervaded all things. Others, however, maintain that Plato affirms the existence of many gods indefinitely, when he uses these words: God of gods, of whom I am both the Creator and Father. But others say that he speaks of a definite number of deities in the following passage: Therefore the mighty Jupiter, wheeling his swift chariot in heaven; and when he enumerates the offspring of the children of heaven and earth. But others assert that (Plato) constituted the gods as generable; and on account of their having been produced, that altogether they were subject to the necessity of corruption, but that on account of the will of God they are immortal, (maintaining this) in the passage already quoted, where, to the words, God of gods, of whom I am Creator and Father, he adds, indissoluble through the fiat of My will; so that if (God) were disposed that these should be dissolved, they would easily be dissolved. And he admits natures (such as those) of demons, and says that some of them are good, but others worthless. And some affirm that he states the soul to be uncreated and immortal, when he uses the following words, Every soul is immortal, for that which is always moved is immortal; and when he demonstrates that the soul is self-moved, and capable of originating motion. Others, however, (say that Plato asserted that the soul was) created, but rendered imperishable through the will of God. But some (will have it that he considered the soul) a composite (essence), and generable and corruptible; for even he supposes that there is a receptacle for it, and that it possesses a luminous body, but that everything generated involves a necessity of corruption. Those, however, who assert the immortality of the soul are especially strengthened in their opinion by those passages (in Plato's writings), where he says, that both there are judgments after death, and tribunals of justice in Hades, and that the virtuous (souls) receive a good reward, while the wicked (ones) suitable punishment. Some notwithstanding assert, that he also acknowledges a transition of souls from one body to another, and that different souls, those that were marked out for such a purpose, pass into different bodies, according to the desert of each, and that after certain definite periods they are sent up into this world to furnish once more a proof of their choice. Others, however, (do not admit this to be his doctrine, but will have it that Plato affirms that the souls) obtain a place according to the desert of each; and they employ as a testimony the saying of his, that some good men are with Jove, and that others are ranging abroad (through heaven) with other gods; whereas that others are involved in eternal punishments, as many as during this life have committed wicked and unjust deeds. And people affirm that Plato says, that some things are without a mean, that others have a mean, that others are a mean. (For example, that) waking and sleep, and such like, are conditions without an intermediate state; but that there are things that had means, for instance virtue and vice; and there are means (between extremes), for instance grey between white and black, or some other color. And they say, that he affirms that the things pertaining to the soul are absolutely alone good, but that the things pertaining to the body, and those external (to it), are not any longer absolutely good, but reputed blessings. And that frequently he names these means also, for that it is possible to use them both well and ill. Some virtues, therefore, he says, are extremes in regard of intrinsic worth, but in regard of their essential nature means, for nothing is more estimable than virtue. But whatever excels or falls short of these terminates in vice. For instance, he says that there are four virtues- prudence, temperance, justice, fortitude- and that on each of these is attendant two vices, according to excess and defect: for example, on prudence, recklessness according to defect, and knavery according to excess; and on temperance, licentiousness according to defect, stupidity according to excess; and on justice, foregoing a claim according to defect, unduly pressing it according to excess; and on fortitude, cowardice according to defect, foolhardiness according to excess. And that these virtues, when inherent in a man, render him perfect, and afford him happiness. And happiness, he says, is assimilation to the Deity, as far as this is possible; and that assimilation to God takes place when any one combines holiness and justice with prudence. For this he supposes the end of supreme wisdom and virtue. And he affirms that the virtues follow one another in turn, and are uniform, and are never antagonistic to each other; whereas that vices are multiform, and sometimes follow one the other, and sometimes are antagonistic to each other. He asserts that fate exists; not, to be sure, that all things are produced according to fate, but that there is even something in our power, as in the passages where he says, The fault is his who chooses, God is blameless; and the following law of Adrasteia. And thus some (contend for his upholding) a system of fate, whereas others one of free-will. He asserts, however, that sins are involuntary. For into what is most glorious of the things in our power, which is the soul, no one would (deliberately) admit what is vicious, that is, transgression, but that from ignorance and an erroneous conception of virtue, supposing that they were achieving something honourable, they pass into vice. And his doctrine on this point is most clear in The Republic, where he says, But, again, you presume to assert that vice is disgraceful and abhorred of God; how then, I may ask, would one choose such an evil thing? He, you reply, (would do so) who is worsted by pleasures. Therefore this also is involuntary, if to gain a victory be voluntary; so that, in every point of view, the committing an act of turpitude, reason proves to be involuntary. Some one, however, in opposition to this (Plato), advances the contrary statement, Why then are men punished if they sin involuntary? But he replies, that he himself also, as soon as possible, may be emancipated from vice, and undergo punishment. For that the undergoing punishment is not an evil, but a good thing, if it is likely to prove a purification of evils; and that the rest of mankind, hearing of it, may not transgress, but guard against such an error. (Plato, however, maintains) that the nature of evil is neither created by the Deity, nor possesses subsistence of itself, but that it derives existence from contrariety to what is good, and from attendance upon it, either by excess and defect, as we have previously affirmed concerning the virtues. Plato unquestionably then, as we have already stated, collecting together the three departments of universal philosophy, in this manner formed his speculative system. 1.23. But Hesiod the poet asserts himself also that he thus heard from the Muses concerning nature, and that the Muses are the daughters of Jupiter. For when for nine nights and days together, Jupiter, through excess of passion, had uninterruptedly lain with Mnemosyne, that Mnemosyne conceived in one womb those nine Muses, becoming pregt with one during each night. Having then summoned the nine Muses from Pieria, that is, Olympus, he exhorted them to undergo instruction:- How first both gods and earth were made, And rivers, and boundless deep, and ocean's surge, And glittering stars, and spacious heaven above; How they grasped the crown and shared the glory, And how at first they held the many-valed Olympus. These (truths), you Muses, tell me of, says he, From first, and next which of them first arose. Chaos, no doubt, the very first, arose; but next Wide-stretching Earth, ever the throne secure of all Immortals, who hold the peaks of white Olympus; And breezy Tartarus in wide earth's recess; And Love, who is most beauteous of the gods immortal, Chasing care away from all the gods and men, Quells in breasts the mind and counsel sage. But Erebus from Chaos and gloomy Night arose; And, in turn, from Night both Air and Day were born; But primal Earth, equal to self in truth begot The stormy sky to veil it round on every side, Ever to be for happy gods a throne secure. And forth she brought the towering hills, the pleasant haunts of nymphs who dwell throughout the woody heights. And also barren Sea begot the surge-tossed Flood, apart from luscious Love; but next Embracing Heaven, she Ocean bred with eddies deep, And Caeus, and Crius, and Hyperian, and Iapetus, And Thia, and Rhea, and Themis, and Mnemosyne, And gold-crowned Phoebe, and comely Tethys. But after these was born last fittest for bearing arms" (for service, as we say).}-- the wiley Cronus, Fiercest of sons; but he abhorred his blooming sire, And in turn the Cyclops bred, who owned a savage breast. And all the rest of the giants from Cronus, Hesiod enumerates, and somewhere afterwards that Jupiter was born of Rhea. All these, then, made the foregoing statements in their doctrine regarding both the nature and generation of the universe. But all, sinking below what is divine, busied themselves concerning the substance of existing things, being astonished at the magnitude of creation, and supposing that it constituted the Deity, each speculator selecting in preference a different portion of the world; failing, however, to discern the God and maker of these. The opinions, therefore, of those who have attempted to frame systems of philosophy among the Greeks, I consider that we have sufficiently explained; and from these the heretics, taking occasion, have endeavoured to establish the tenets that will be after a short time declared. It seems, however, expedient, that first explaining the mystical rites and whatever imaginary doctrines some have laboriously framed concerning the stars, or magnitudes, to declare these; for heretics likewise, taking occasion from them, are considered by the multitude to utter prodigies. Next in order we shall elucidate the feeble opinions advanced by these. Books 2 and 3 are wanting.
6. Justin, First Apology, 1.1, 13.4, 14.3, 16.4, 23.2, 26.1-26.4, 31.5-31.7, 56.1-56.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Justin, Second Apology, 1.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 16.2, 17.1, 19.3, 34.7, 35.4, 40.2, 46.2, 46.7, 80.3, 82.2, 101.2, 108.2, 110.4-110.5, 114.4, 117.3, 121.3, 134.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Tertullian, On The Soul, 34 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.16, 4.18.6, 6.12 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.18.6. He composed also a dialogue against the Jews, which he held in the city of Ephesus with Trypho, a most distinguished man among the Hebrews of that day. In it he shows how the divine grace urged him on to the doctrine of the faith, and with what earnestness he had formerly pursued philosophical studies, and how ardent a search he had made for the truth.
11. Origen, Against Celsus, 5.62 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.62. He next pours down upon us a heap of names, saying that he knows of the existence of certain Simonians who worship Helene, or Helenus, as their teacher, and are called Helenians. But it has escaped the notice of Celsus that the Simonians do not at all acknowledge Jesus to be the Son of God, but term Simon the power of God, regarding whom they relate certain marvellous stories, saying that he imagined that if he could become possessed of similar powers to those with which be believed Jesus to be endowed, he too would become as powerful among men as Jesus was among the multitude. But neither Celsus nor Simon could comprehend how Jesus, like a good husbandman of the word of God, was able to sow the greater part of Greece, and of barbarian lands, with His doctrine, and to fill these countries with words which transform the soul from all that is evil, and bring it back to the Creator of all things. Celsus knows, moreover, certain Marcellians, so called from Marcellina, and Harpocratians from Salome, and others who derive their name from Mariamme, and others again from Martha. We, however, who from a love of learning examine to the utmost of our ability not only the contents of Scripture, and the differences to which they give rise, but have also, from love to the truth, investigated as far as we could the opinions of philosophers, have never at any time met with these sects. He makes mention also of the Marcionites, whose leader was Marcion.
12. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Recognitiones (E Pseudocaesario), 2.9, 2.15 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

13. Anon., Apostolic Constitutions, 6.7 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

14. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Recognitions, 2.9, 2.15 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

2.9. But not long after he fell in love with that woman whom they call Luna; and he confided all things to us as his friends: how he was a magician, and how he loved Luna, and how, being desirous of glory, he was unwilling to enjoy her ingloriously, but that he was waiting patiently till he could enjoy her honourably; yet so if we also would conspire with him towards the accomplishment of his desires. And he promised that, as a reward of this service, he would cause us to be invested with the highest honours, and we should be believed by men to be gods; 'Only, however, on condition,' says he, 'that you confer the chief place upon me, Simon, who by magic art am able to show many signs and prodigies, by means of which either my glory or our sect may be established. For I am able to render myself invisible to those who wish to lay hold of me, and again to be visible when I am willing to be seen. If I wish to flee, I can dig through the mountains, and pass through rocks as if they were clay. If I should throw myself headlong from a lofty mountain, I should be borne unhurt to the earth, as if I were held up; when bound, I can loose myself, and bind those who had bound me; being shut up in prison, I can make the barriers open of their own accord; I can render statues animated, so that those who see suppose that they are men. I can make new trees suddenly spring up, and produce sprouts at once. I can throw myself into the fire, and not be burnt; I can change my countece, so that I cannot be recognised; but I can show people that I have two faces. I shall change myself into a sheep or a goat; I shall make a beard to grow upon little boys; I shall ascend by flight into the air; I shall exhibit abundance of gold, and shall make and unmake kings. I shall be worshipped as God; I shall have divine honours publicly assigned to me, so that an image of me shall be set up, and I shall be worshipped and adored as God. And what need of more words? Whatever I wish, that I shall be able to do. For already I have achieved many things by way of experiment. In short,' says he, 'once when my mother Rachel ordered me to go to the field to reap, and I saw a sickle lying, I ordered it to go and reap; and it reaped ten times more than the others. Lately, I produced many new sprouts from the earth, and made them bear leaves and produce fruit in a moment; and the nearest mountain I successfully bored through.' 2.15. As we spoke these and such like words with looks suited to the occasion, this most vain fellow believed that we were deceived; and being thereby the more elated, he added also this: 'I shall now be propitious to you, for the affection which you bear towards me as God; for you loved me while you did not know me, and were seeking me in ignorance. But I would not have you doubt that this is truly to be God, when one is able to become small or great as he pleases; for I am able to appear to man in whatever manner I please. Now, then, I shall begin to unfold to you what is true. Once on a time, I, by my power, turning air into water, and water again into blood, and solidifying it into flesh, formed a new human creature — a boy — and produced a much nobler work than God the Creator. For He created a man from the earth, but I from air — a far more difficult matter; and again I unmade him and restored him to air, but not until I had placed his picture and image in my bed-chamber, as a proof and memorial of my work.' Then we understood that he spoke concerning that boy, whose soul, after he had been slain by violence, he made use of for those services which he required.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram,jewish patriarch Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
aeons Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
antoninus pius Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 260; Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 298
baptism/baptize Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
bar kochba,jewish leader Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
children Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
christ,an appearance/apparition/semblance Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
christ,simon magus is christ Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
christianity,and greek/pagan religion Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 217
christians,numbers of Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
clivus Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
cross,apparent only Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
deacon Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
dialogue with trypho the jew Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 217
dwellings Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
educated,erudite Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 260
egypt Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
ethics Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
family Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
father,gnostic usage Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
fayum Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
flora Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
fraud,deceit Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
friendship Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
fullers (cloth) Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
gnosticism Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
godlessness,reproach of Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
graeco-roman culture Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 217
heretics {see also gnostics; marcionites) Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 260
integration Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
irenaeus,other heresiological themes Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
isis,egyptian goddess Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
jerusalem (zion),temple Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
jerusalem (zion) Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
jews,jewish Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
jews Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
justin,christian apologist Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
justin,christian writer Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 217
justin Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103, 260
laborers,manual Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
magic/sorcery Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
marcion Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 260
marcus aurelius Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 260
martyr,justin,use of greek models for heresy Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
menander Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79; Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 22, 298
mixed marriages Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
names Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 22
paganism,heresy assimilated to Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
persecution,martyrs Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103, 260
philosophical school Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 22, 298
polycarp,christian martyr Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
pompeus marcus,roman citizen Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
pythagoreanism Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 298
residences (tenement houses) Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
rome Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 298; Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
samaria Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 298
samaritans Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
saturninus Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
schools,christian Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 22
schools,philosophical Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 298
secundians Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
serapis,egyptian god Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
shoemakers Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
simon magus Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 22, 298; Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
simon of samaria,as source of all heresy Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
simon of samaria Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
simonians (sect) Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
slaves,slavery Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
spirit/spirits,conferred through laying on of hands Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
stoicism Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 298
stratification,social Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
succession,heretical succession Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
succession Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
supernatural being,simon/meder a power of god Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
syntagma by justin Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 22
tatian Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 217
tibur,hadrians villa,canopus Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
tibur,hadrians villa,piazza doro Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
trypho,the jew Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 217
valentinians Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
valentinus Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 61
women' Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
δύναμις Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79
μαθήτης Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 79