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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7289
Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 108.2
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 7.11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

7.11. וַיִּקְרָא גַּם־פַּרְעֹה לַחֲכָמִים וְלַמְכַשְּׁפִים וַיַּעֲשׂוּ גַם־הֵם חַרְטֻמֵּי מִצְרַיִם בְּלַהֲטֵיהֶם כֵּן׃ 7.11. Then Pharaoh also called for the wise men and the sorcerers; and they also, the magicians of Egypt, did in like manner with their secret arts."
2. Hebrew Bible, 1 Kings, 18 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 29.19 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

29.19. וְיָסְפוּ עֲנָוִים בַּיהוָה שִׂמְחָה וְאֶבְיוֹנֵי אָדָם בִּקְדוֹשׁ יִשְׂרָאֵל יָגִילוּ׃ 29.19. The humble also shall increase their joy in the LORD, and the neediest among men shall exult in the Holy One of Israel."
4. Epictetus, Discourses, 4.7.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 2.118 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.118. Under his administration it was that a certain Galilean, whose name was Judas, prevailed with his countrymen to revolt, and said they were cowards if they would endure to pay a tax to the Romans and would after God submit to mortal men as their lords. This man was a teacher of a peculiar sect of his own, and was not at all like the rest of those their leaders.
6. New Testament, Acts, 1.11, 2.7, 2.22, 5.37, 13.10, 24.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.11. who also said, "You men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into the sky? This Jesus, who was received up from you into the sky will come back in the same way as you saw him going into the sky. 2.7. They were all amazed and marveled, saying to one another, "Behold, aren't all these who speak Galileans? 2.22. You men of Israel, hear these words. Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved by God to you by mighty works and wonders and signs which God did by him in the midst of you, even as you yourselves know 5.37. After this man, Judas of Galilee rose up in the days of the enrollment, and drew away some people after him. He also perished, and all, as many as obeyed him, were scattered abroad. 13.10. and said, "Full of all deceit and all cunning, you son of the devil, you enemy of all righteousness, will you not cease to pervert the right ways of the Lord? 24.5. For we have found this man to be a plague, an instigator of insurrections among all the Jews throughout the world, and a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes.
7. New Testament, John, 7.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7.12. There was much murmuring among the multitudes concerning him. Some said, "He is a good man." Others said, "Not so, but he leads the multitude astray.
8. New Testament, Luke, 4.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.16. He came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up. He entered, as was his custom, into the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and stood up to read.
9. New Testament, Matthew, 2.22-2.23, 9.34, 12.24, 27.63 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.22. But when he heard that Archelaus was reigning over Judea in the place of his father, Herod, he was afraid to go there. Being warned in a dream, he withdrew into the region of Galilee 2.23. and came and lived in a city called Nazareth; that it might be fulfilled which was spoken through the prophets: "He will be called a Nazarene. 9.34. But the Pharisees said, "By the prince of the demons, he casts out demons. 12.24. But when the Pharisees heard it, they said, "This man does not cast out demons, except by Beelzebul, the prince of the demons. 27.63. saying, "Sir, we remember what that deceiver said while he was still alive: 'After three days I will rise again.'
10. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 12.2, 13.1, 17.2 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)

12.2. 2 When this had been said by the herald, all the multitude of heathen and Jews living in Smyrna cried out with uncontrollable wrath and a loud shout: "This is the teacher of Asia, the father of the Christians, the destroyer of our Gods, who teaches many neither to offer sacrifice nor to worship." And when they said this, they cried out and asked Philip the Asiarch to let loose a lion on Polycarp. But he said he could not legally do this, since he had closed the Sports. 13.1. 1 These things then happened with so great speed, quicker than it takes to tell, and the crowd came together immediately, and prepared wood and faggots from the work-shops and baths and the Jews were extremely zealous, as is their custom, in assisting at this. 17.2. 2 Therefore he put forward Niketas, the father of Herod, and the brother of Alce, to ask the Governor not to give his body, "Lest," he said, "they leave the crucified one and begin to worship this man." And they said this owing to the suggestions and pressure of the Jews, who also watched when we were going to take it from the fire, for they do not know that we shall not ever be able either to abandon Christ, who suffered for the salvation of those who are being saved in the whole world, the innocent for sinners, or to worship any other.
11. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 4.6.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Justin, First Apology, 13.4, 14.3, 16.4, 23.2, 26.7, 31.5-31.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. But we have received by tradition that God does not need the material offerings which men can give, seeing, indeed, that He Himself is the provider of all things. And we have been taught, and are convinced, and do believe, that He accepts those only who imitate the excellences which reside in Him, temperance, and justice, and philanthropy, and as many virtues as are peculiar to a God who is called by no proper name. And we have been taught that He in the beginning did of His goodness, for man's sake, create all things out of unformed matter; and if men by their works show themselves worthy of this His design, they are deemed worthy, and so we have received - of reigning in company with Him, being delivered from corruption and suffering. For as in the beginning He created us when we were not, so do we consider that, in like manner, those who choose what is pleasing to Him are, on account of their choice, deemed worthy of incorruption and of fellowship with Him. For the coming into being at first was not in our own power; and in order that we may follow those things which please Him, choosing them by means of the rational faculties He has Himself endowed us with, He both persuades us and leads us to faith. And we think it for the advantage of all men that they are not restrained from learning these things, but are even urged thereto. For the restraint which human laws could not effect, the Word, inasmuch as He is divine, would have effected, had not the wicked demons, taking as their ally the lust of wickedness which is in every man, and which draws variously to all manner of vice, scattered many false and profane accusations, none of which attach to us.
13. Justin, Second Apology, 1.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 2.2, 7.1, 16.2, 17.1, 19.3, 34.7, 35.3, 46.7, 51.2, 62.3-62.4, 80.4, 82.2, 101.2, 110.4-110.5, 114.4, 117.3, 120.6, 121.3, 134.6, 137.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 6.12 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

16. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.6, 7.69 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.6. After this, through the influence of some motive which is unknown to me, Celsus asserts that it is by the names of certain demons, and by the use of incantations, that the Christians appear to be possessed of (miraculous) power; hinting, I suppose, at the practices of those who expel evil spirits by incantations. And here he manifestly appears to malign the Gospel. For it is not by incantations that Christians seem to prevail (over evil spirits), but by the name of Jesus, accompanied by the announcement of the narratives which relate to Him; for the repetition of these has frequently been the means of driving demons out of men, especially when those who repeated them did so in a sound and genuinely believing spirit. Such power, indeed, does the name of Jesus possess over evil spirits, that there have been instances where it was effectual, when it was pronounced even by bad men, which Jesus Himself taught (would be the case), when He said: Many shall say to Me in that day, In Your name we have cast out devils, and done many wonderful works. Whether Celsus omitted this from intentional malignity, or from ignorance, I do not know. And he next proceeds to bring a charge against the Saviour Himself, alleging that it was by means of sorcery that He was able to accomplish the wonders which He performed; and that foreseeing that others would attain the same knowledge, and do the same things, making a boast of doing them by help of the power of God, He excludes such from His kingdom. And his accusation is, that if they are justly excluded, while He Himself is guilty of the same practices, He is a wicked man; but if He is not guilty of wickedness in doing such things, neither are they who do the same as He. But even if it be impossible to show by what power Jesus wrought these miracles, it is clear that Christians employ no spells or incantations, but the simple name of Jesus, and certain other words in which they repose faith, according to the holy Scriptures. 7.69. And it is not we alone who speak of wicked demons, but almost all who acknowledge the existence of demons. Thus, then, it is not true that all observe the law of the Most High; for all who fall away from the divine law, whether through heedlessness, or through depravity and vice, or through ignorance of what is right, all such do not keep the law of God, but, to use a new phrase which we find in Scripture, the law of sin. I say, then, that in the opinion of most of those who believe in the existence of demons, some of them are wicked; and these, instead of keeping the law of God, offend against it. But, according to our belief, it is true of all demons, that they were not demons originally, but they became so in departing from the true way; so that the name demons is given to those beings who have fallen away from God. Accordingly, those who worship God must not serve demons. We may also learn the true nature of demons if we consider the practice of those who call upon them by charms to prevent certain things, or for many other purposes. For this is the method they adopt, in order by means of incantations and magical arts to invoke the demons, and induce them to further their wishes. Wherefore, the worship of all demons would be inconsistent in us who worship the Supreme God; and the service of demons is the service of so-called gods, for all the gods of the heathen are demons. The same thing also appears from the fact that the dedication of the most famous of the so-called sacred places, whether temples or statues, was accompanied by curious magical incantations, which were performed by those who zealously served the demons with magical arts. Hence we are determined to avoid the worship of demons even as we would avoid death; and we hold that the worship, which is supposed among the Greeks to be rendered to gods at the altars, and images, and temples, is in reality offered to demons.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram,jewish patriarch Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
bar kochba,jewish leader Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
children Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
christians,numbers of Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
clement of rome,and heresy Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
clivus Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
deacon Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
dwellings Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
ebrietas Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
egypt Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
ethics Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
eucharist Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
family Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
fayum Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
fraud,deceit Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
friendship Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
fullers (cloth) Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
galileans Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 71, 72
genists Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 72
gnosticism,as heretical or other Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 58, 59
godlessness,reproach of Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
hellenians Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 71
integration Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
isis,egyptian goddess Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
isis Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
jerusalem (zion),temple Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
jerusalem (zion) Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
jewish succession,listing of sects of Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 71, 72
jews,jewish Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
justin,christian apologist Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
justin Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
laborers,manual Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
magic,christians,accused of Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
magic Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
martyr,justin,distinctive features of his heresiology Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
martyr,justin,naming sects Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 58, 59, 71, 72
martyr,justin Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 58, 59
menander Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
metamorphoses,apuleius,by Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
mixed marriages Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
paganism Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
parody,apuleiuss metamorphosis,in Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
passio anastasiae Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
persecution,martyrs Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
pharisees Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59, 72
philosophy,positive invocation and use of Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 58
platonism,middle platonism Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 58
polycarp,christian martyr Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
pompeus marcus,roman citizen Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
residences (tenement houses) Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
rome Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
sadducees Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 72
satan,and heresy Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
scripture,as weapon/criterion against heresy Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 72
serapis,egyptian god Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
shoemakers Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
simon of samaria Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
slaves,slavery Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
stratification,social Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
superstitio,malefica' Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 155
syntagma by justin Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 19
tibur,hadrians villa,canopus Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
tibur,hadrians villa,piazza doro Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 146
trypho Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 19
valentinians Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 71
women Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 103
δύναμις Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
κατάπληξις Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 59
πλάνος Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 71
σύνταγμα Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 58, 59
ἀηδῶς Boulluec (2022), The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries, 72