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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7289
Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 108


nanThe resurrection of Christ did not convert the Jews. But through the whole world they have sent men to accuse Christ Justin: And though all the men of your nation knew the incidents in the life of Jonah, and though Christ said among you that He would give the sign of Jonah, exhorting you to repent of your wicked deeds at least after He rose again from the dead, and to mourn before God as did the Ninevites, in order that your nation and city might not be taken and destroyed, as they have been destroyed; yet you not only have not repented, after you learned that He rose from the dead, but, as I said before you have sent chosen and ordained men throughout all the world to proclaim that a godless and lawless heresy had sprung from one Jesus, a Galilæan deceiver, whom we crucified, but his disciples stole him by night from the tomb, where he was laid when unfastened from the cross, and now deceive men by asserting that he has risen from the dead and ascended to heaven. Moreover, you accuse Him of having taught those godless, lawless, and unholy doctrines which you mention to the condemnation of those who confess Him to be Christ, and a Teacher from and Son of God. Besides this, even when your city is captured, and your land ravaged, you do not repent, but dare to utter imprecations on Him and all who believe in Him. Yet we do not hate you or those who, by your means, have conceived such prejudices against us; but we pray that even now all of you may repent and obtain mercy from God, the compassionate and long-suffering Father of all.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 3, 2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 4.6.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3. Justin, First Apology, 32.4-32.6, 38.8, 53.2-53.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. For among us the prince of the wicked spirits is called the serpent, and Satan, and the devil, as you can learn by looking into our writings. And that he would be sent into the fire with his host, and the men who follow him, and would be punished for an endless duration, Christ foretold. For the reason why God has delayed to do this, is His regard for the human race. For He foreknows that some are to be saved by repentance, some even that are perhaps not yet born. In the beginning He made the human race with the power of thought and of choosing the truth and doing right, so that all men are without excuse before God; for they have been born rational and contemplative. And if any one disbelieves that God cares for these things, he will thereby either insinuate that God does not exist, or he will assert that though He exists He delights in vice, or exists like a stone, and that neither virtue nor vice are anything, but only in the opinion of men these things are reckoned good or evil. And this is the greatest profanity and wickedness.
4. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 16.4, 93.4, 103.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

100. In what sense Christ is [called] Jacob, and Israel, and Son of Man Justin: Then what follows—'But You, the praise of Israel, inhabit the holy place'— declared that He is to do something worthy of praise and wonderment, being about to rise again from the dead on the third day after the crucifixion; and this He has obtained from the Father. For I have showed already that Christ is called both Jacob and Israel; and I have proved that it is not in the blessing of Joseph and Judah alone that what relates to Him was proclaimed mysteriously, but also in the Gospel it is written that He said: 'All things are delivered unto me by My Father.' and, 'No man knows the Father but the Son; nor the Son but the Father, and they to whom the Son will reveal Him.' Matthew 11:27 Accordingly He revealed to us all that we have perceived by His grace out of the Scriptures, so that we know Him to be the first-begotten of God, and to be before all creatures; likewise to be the Son of the patriarchs, since He assumed flesh by the Virgin of their family, and submitted to become a man without comeliness, dishonoured, and subject to suffering. Hence, also, among His words He said, when He was discoursing about His future sufferings: 'The Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the Pharisees and Scribes, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.' Matthew 16:21 He said then that He was the Son of man, either because of His birth by the Virgin, who was, as I said, of the family of David and Jacob, and Isaac, and Abraham; or because Adam was the father both of Himself and of those who have been first enumerated from whom Mary derives her descent. For we know that the fathers of women are the fathers likewise of those children whom their daughters bear. For [Christ] called one of His disciples— previously known by the name of Simon — Peter; since he recognised Him to be Christ the Son of God, by the revelation of His Father: and since we find it recorded in the memoirs of His apostles that He is the Son of God, and since we call Him the Son, we have understood that He proceeded before all creatures from the Father by His power and will (for He is addressed in the writings of the prophets in one way or another as Wisdom, and the Day, and the East, and a Sword, and a Stone, and a Rod, and Jacob, and Israel); and that He became man by the Virgin, in order that the disobedience which proceeded from the serpent might receive its destruction in the same manner in which it derived its origin. For Eve, who was a virgin and undefiled, having conceived the word of the serpent, brought forth disobedience and death. But the Virgin Mary received faith and joy, when the angel Gabriel announced the good tidings to her that the Spirit of the Lord would come upon her, and the power of the Highest would overshadow her: wherefore also the Holy Thing begotten of her is the Son of God; and she replied, 'Be it unto me according to your word.' Luke 1:38 And by her has He been born, to whom we have proved so many Scriptures refer, and by whom God destroys both the serpent and those angels and men who are like him; but works deliverance from death to those who repent of their wickedness and believe upon Him.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adam and eve, in geneology of error Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167
angelic descent, and anti-pagan polemics Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
angelic sin, as epistemological transgression Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
apocalyptic literature, and book of daniel Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
apocalyptic literature, history of scholarship on Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
apologists, generally Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 531
apology, apologetics, christian Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
apostles Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
aristeus Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 717
bar kokhba revolt Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167
birth Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
bread Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
christianity, attitudes towards jews in Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
circumcision Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167
community Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
creation Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
cross Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
crucifixion Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
demons, as enemies of christ Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
demons, christian association with jews Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
demons, pagan enslavement to Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
enochic literary tradition, place of book of dreams in Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
eucharist Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
evil, supernatural etiology of Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
fallen angels, as enemies of christ Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
first day of the week Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
fulfilment Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
genesis, and book of the watchers Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
greco-roman culture, christian polemics against Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
heresy Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
historiography, christian Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167
immortality Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
intermarriage Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
israel, and the angels Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
jerusalem Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
jesus Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167
judgement Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
just Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
justin martyr, theology Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 531
justin martyr Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
knowledge, revealed Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
law Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
literary production Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
mark, empty grave Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 717
mark Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 717
miracles Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 717
noah Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167, 169
passion Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
persecution Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 169
philo of alexandria Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
rabbis Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
resurrection, proof of Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 717
resurrection, vs. translation Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 717
scripture, christian, justin martyr Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 531
self-definition, christian Reed, Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature (2005) 167
third day Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
tomb Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
translation to divine realm Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 717
valentinians Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174
worship' Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 174