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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7235
Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 6.390


nanThe treasurer of the temple also, whose name was Phineas, was seized on, and showed Titus the coats and girdles of the priests, with a great quantity of purple and scarlet, which were there reposited for the uses of the veil, as also a great deal of cinnamon and cassia, with a large quantity of other sweet spices, which used to be mixed together, and offered as incense to God every day.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 27.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

27.16. וּלְשַׁעַר הֶחָצֵר מָסָךְ עֶשְׂרִים אַמָּה תְּכֵלֶת וְאַרְגָּמָן וְתוֹלַעַת שָׁנִי וְשֵׁשׁ מָשְׁזָר מַעֲשֵׂה רֹקֵם עַמֻּדֵיהֶם אַרְבָּעָה וְאַדְנֵיהֶם אַרְבָּעָה׃ 27.16. And for the gate of the court shall be a screen of twenty cubits, of blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen, the work of the weaver in colours: their pillars four, and their sockets four."
2. Hebrew Bible, 1 Kings, 6.3, 6.17, 6.27, 7.50, 21.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.3. וְהָאוּלָם עַל־פְּנֵי הֵיכַל הַבַּיִת עֶשְׂרִים אַמָּה אָרְכּוֹ עַל־פְּנֵי רֹחַב הַבָּיִת עֶשֶׂר בָּאַמָּה רָחְבּוֹ עַל־פְּנֵי הַבָּיִת׃ 6.3. וְאֶת־קַרְקַע הַבַּיִת צִפָּה זָהָב לִפְנִימָה וְלַחִיצוֹן׃ 6.17. וְאַרְבָּעִים בָּאַמָּה הָיָה הַבָּיִת הוּא הַהֵיכָל לִפְנָי׃ 6.27. וַיִּתֵּן אֶת־הַכְּרוּבִים בְּתוֹךְ הַבַּיִת הַפְּנִימִי וַיִּפְרְשׂוּ אֶת־כַּנְפֵי הַכְּרֻבִים וַתִּגַּע כְּנַף־הָאֶחָד בַּקִּיר וּכְנַף הַכְּרוּב הַשֵּׁנִי נֹגַעַת בַּקִּיר הַשֵּׁנִי וְכַנְפֵיהֶם אֶל־תּוֹךְ הַבַּיִת נֹגְעֹת כָּנָף אֶל־כָּנָף׃ 21.1. וַיְהִי אַחַר הַדְּבָרִים הָאֵלֶּה כֶּרֶם הָיָה לְנָבוֹת הַיִּזְרְעֵאלִי אֲשֶׁר בְּיִזְרְעֶאל אֵצֶל הֵיכַל אַחְאָב מֶלֶךְ שֹׁמְרוֹן׃ 21.1. וְהוֹשִׁיבוּ שְׁנַיִם אֲנָשִׁים בְּנֵי־בְלִיַּעַל נֶגְדּוֹ וִיעִדֻהוּ לֵאמֹר בֵּרַכְתָּ אֱלֹהִים וָמֶלֶךְ וְהוֹצִיאֻהוּ וְסִקְלֻהוּ וְיָמֹת׃ 6.3. And the porch before the atemple of the house, twenty cubits was the length thereof, according to the breadth of the house; and ten cubits was the breadth thereof before the house." 6.17. And the house, that is, the temple before [the Sanctuary], was forty cubits long." 6.27. And he set the cherubim within the inner house; and the wings of the cherubim were stretched forth, so that the wing of the one touched the one wall, and the wing of the other cherub touched the other wall; and their wings touched one another in the midst of the house." 7.50. and the cups, and the snuffers, and the basins, and the pans, and the fire-pans, of pure gold; and the hinges, both for the doors of the inner house, the most holy place, and for the doors of the house, that is, of the temple, of gold." 21.1. And it came to pass after these things, that Naboth the Jezreelite had a vineyard, which was in Jezreel, hard by the palace of Ahab, king of Samaria."
3. Hebrew Bible, 1 Samuel, 1.9 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.9. וַתָּקָם חַנָּה אַחֲרֵי אָכְלָה בְשִׁלֹה וְאַחֲרֵי שָׁתֹה וְעֵלִי הַכֹּהֵן יֹשֵׁב עַל־הַכִּסֵּא עַל־מְזוּזַת הֵיכַל יְהוָה׃ 1.9. So Ĥanna rose up after they had eaten in Shilo, and after they had drunk. Now ῾Eli the priest sat upon a seat by the gate post of the temple of the Lord."
4. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 3 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5. Livy, History, 9.43.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 8.75, 8.90, 12.250, 14.105-14.109, 20.15, 20.222 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.75. And, to say all in one word, he left no part of the temple, neither internal nor external, but what was covered with gold. He also had curtains drawn over these doors in like manner as they were drawn over the inner doors of the most holy place; but the porch of the temple had nothing of that sort. 14.105. 1. Now Crassus, as he was going upon his expedition against the Parthians, came into Judea, and carried off the money that was in the temple, which Pompey had left, being two thousand talents, and was disposed to spoil it of all the gold belonging to it, which was eight thousand talents. 14.106. He also took a beam, which was made of solid beaten gold, of the weight of three hundred minae, each of which weighed two pounds and a half. It was the priest who was guardian of the sacred treasures, and whose name was Eleazar, that gave him this beam, not out of a wicked design 14.107. for he was a good and a righteous man; but being intrusted with the custody of the veils belonging to the temple, which were of admirable beauty, and of very costly workmanship, and hung down from this beam, when he saw that Crassus was busy in gathering money, and was in fear for the entire ornaments of the temple, he gave him this beam of gold as a ransom for the whole 14.108. but this not till he had given his oath that he would remove nothing else out of the temple, but be satisfied with this only, which he should give him, being worth many ten thousand [shekels]. Now this beam was contained in a wooden beam that was hollow, but was known to no others; but Eleazar alone knew it; 14.109. yet did Crassus take away this beam, upon the condition of touching nothing else that belonged to the temple, and then brake his oath, and carried away all the gold that was in the temple. 20.15. 3. Herod also, the brother of the deceased Agrippa, who was then possessed of the royal authority over Chalcis, petitioned Claudius Caesar for the authority over the temple, and the money of the sacred treasure, and the choice of the high priests, and obtained all that he petitioned for. 20.15. their eldest sister was Antonia, whom he had by Pelina his first wife. He also married Octavia to Nero; for that was the name that Caesar gave him afterward, upon his adopting him for his son. 20.222. But king Agrippa, who had the care of the temple committed to him by Claudius Caesar, considering that it is easy to demolish any building, but hard to build it up again, and that it was particularly hard to do it to these cloisters, which would require a considerable time, and great sums of money, he denied the petitioners their request about that matter; but he did not obstruct them when they desired the city might be paved with white stone.
7. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 5.201-5.227, 5.232, 5.236, 6.387-6.389, 6.391, 7.148-7.150, 7.161 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.201. 3. Now nine of these gates were on every side covered over with gold and silver, as were the jambs of their doors and their lintels; but there was one gate that was without [the inward court of] the holy house, which was of Corinthian brass, and greatly excelled those that were only covered over with silver and gold. 5.202. Each gate had two doors, whose height was severally thirty cubits, and their breadth fifteen. 5.203. However, they had large spaces within of thirty cubits, and had on each side rooms, and those, both in breadth and in length, built like towers, and their height was above forty cubits. Two pillars did also support these rooms, and were in circumference twelve cubits. 5.204. Now the magnitudes of the other gates were equal one to another; but that over the Corinthian gate, which opened on the east over against the gate of the holy house itself, was much larger; 5.205. for its height was fifty cubits; and its doors were forty cubits; and it was adorned after a most costly manner, as having much richer and thicker plates of silver and gold upon them than the other. These nine gates had that silver and gold poured upon them by Alexander, the father of Tiberius. 5.206. Now there were fifteen steps, which led away from the wall of the court of the women to this greater gate; whereas those that led thither from the other gates were five steps shorter. 5.207. 4. As to the holy house itself, which was placed in the midst [of the inmost court], that most sacred part of the temple, it was ascended to by twelve steps; and in front its height and its breadth were equal, and each a hundred cubits, though it was behind forty cubits narrower; for on its front it had what may be styled shoulders on each side, that passed twenty cubits further. 5.208. Its first gate was seventy cubits high, and twenty-five cubits broad; but this gate had no doors; for it represented the universal visibility of heaven, and that it cannot be excluded from any place. Its front was covered with gold all over, and through it the first part of the house, that was more inward, did all of it appear; which, as it was very large, so did all the parts about the more inward gate appear to shine to those that saw them; 5.209. but then, as the entire house was divided into two parts within, it was only the first part of it that was open to our view. Its height extended all along to ninety cubits in height, and its length was fifty cubits, and its breadth twenty. 5.211. But then this house, as it was divided into two parts, the inner part was lower than the appearance of the outer, and had golden doors of fifty-five cubits altitude, and sixteen in breadth; 5.212. but before these doors there was a veil of equal largeness with the doors. It was a Babylonian curtain, embroidered with blue, and fine linen, and scarlet, and purple, and of a contexture that was truly wonderful. Nor was this mixture of colors without its mystical interpretation, but was a kind of image of the universe; 5.213. for by the scarlet there seemed to be enigmatically signified fire, by the fine flax the earth, by the blue the air, and by the purple the sea; two of them having their colors the foundation of this resemblance; but the fine flax and the purple have their own origin for that foundation, the earth producing the one, and the sea the other. 5.214. This curtain had also embroidered upon it all that was mystical in the heavens, excepting that of the [twelve] signs, representing living creatures. 5.215. 5. When any persons entered into the temple, its floor received them. This part of the temple therefore was in height sixty cubits, and its length the same; whereas its breadth was but twenty cubits: 5.216. but still that sixty cubits in length was divided again, and the first part of it was cut off at forty cubits, and had in it three things that were very wonderful and famous among all mankind, the candlestick, the table [of shew-bread], and the altar of incense. 5.217. Now, the seven lamps signified the seven planets; for so many there were springing out of the candlestick. Now, the twelve loaves that were upon the table signified the circle of the zodiac and the year; 5.218. but the altar of incense, by its thirteen kinds of sweet-smelling spices with which the sea replenished it, signified that God is the possessor of all things that are both in the uninhabitable and habitable parts of the earth, and that they are all to be dedicated to his use. 5.219. But the inmost part of the temple of all was of twenty cubits. This was also separated from the outer part by a veil. In this there was nothing at all. It was inaccessible and inviolable, and not to be seen by any; and was called the Holy of Holies. 5.221. But the superior part of the temple had no such little houses any further, because the temple was there narrower, and forty cubits higher, and of a smaller body than the lower parts of it. Thus we collect that the whole height, including the sixty cubits from the floor, amounted to a hundred cubits. 5.222. 6. Now the outward face of the temple in its front wanted nothing that was likely to surprise either men’s minds or their eyes; for it was covered all over with plates of gold of great weight, and, at the first rising of the sun, reflected back a very fiery splendor, and made those who forced themselves to look upon it to turn their eyes away, just as they would have done at the sun’s own rays. 5.223. But this temple appeared to strangers, when they were coming to it at a distance, like a mountain covered with snow; for as to those parts of it that were not gilt, they were exceeding white. 5.224. On its top it had spikes with sharp points, to prevent any pollution of it by birds sitting upon it. of its stones, some of them were forty-five cubits in length, five in height, and six in breadth. 5.225. Before this temple stood the altar, fifteen cubits high, and equal both in length and breadth; each of which dimensions was fifty cubits. The figure it was built in was a square, and it had corners like horns; and the passage up to it was by an insensible acclivity. It was formed without any iron tool, nor did any such iron tool so much as touch it at any time. 5.226. There was also a wall of partition, about a cubit in height, made of fine stones, and so as to be grateful to the sight; this encompassed the holy house and the altar, and kept the people that were on the outside off from the priests. 5.227. Moreover, those that had the gonorrhea and the leprosy were excluded out of the city entirely; women also, when their courses were upon them, were shut out of the temple; nor when they were free from that impurity, were they allowed to go beyond the limit before-mentioned; men also, that were not thoroughly pure, were prohibited to come into the inner [court of the] temple; nay, the priests themselves that were not pure were prohibited to come into it also. 5.232. But that girdle that tied the garment to the breast was embroidered with five rows of various colors, of gold, and purple, and scarlet, as also of fine linen and blue, with which colors we told you before the veils of the temple were embroidered also. 5.236. However, the high priest did not wear these garments at other times, but a more plain habit; he only did it when he went into the most sacred part of the temple, which he did but once in a year, on that day when our custom is for all of us to keep a fast to God. 6.387. 3. But now at this time it was that one of the priests, the son of Thebuthus, whose name was Jesus, upon his having security given him, by the oath of Caesar, that he should be preserved, upon condition that he should deliver to him certain of the precious things that had been reposited in the temple 6.388. came out of it, and delivered him from the wall of the holy house two candlesticks, like to those that lay in the holy house, with tables, and cisterns, and vials, all made of solid gold, and very heavy. 6.389. He also delivered to him the veils and the garments, with the precious stones, and a great number of other precious vessels that belonged to their sacred worship. 6.391. A great many other treasures were also delivered to him, with sacred ornaments of the temple not a few; which things thus delivered to Titus obtained of him for this man the same pardon that he had allowed to such as deserted of their own accord. 7.148. and for the other spoils, they were carried in great plenty. But for those that were taken in the temple of Jerusalem, they made the greatest figure of them all; that is, the golden table, of the weight of many talents; the candlestick also, that was made of gold, though its construction were now changed from that which we made use of; 7.149. for its middle shaft was fixed upon a basis, and the small branches were produced out of it to a great length, having the likeness of a trident in their position, and had every one a socket made of brass for a lamp at the tops of them. These lamps were in number seven, and represented the dignity of the number seven among the Jews; 7.161. he also laid up therein, as ensigns of his glory, those golden vessels and instruments that were taken out of the Jewish temple.
8. Mishnah, Nedarim, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.3. If one says “Not-unconsecrated food shall I not eat from you”, “Not fit”, or “Not pure”, “Clean” or “Unclean”, “Remt” or “Piggul he is bound [by his vow]. [If one says, “May it be to me], as the lamb”, “As the Temple pens”, “As the wood [on the altar]”, “As the fire [on the altar]”, “As the altar”, “As the Temple” or “As Jerusalem”; [or] if one vowed by reference to the altar utensils, even though he did not mention “korban”, behold this one was vowed by a korban. Rabbi Judah said: He who says “Jerusalem” has said nothing."
9. Mishnah, Shevuot, 4.13 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.13. [If he said]: \"I adjure you\"; \"I command you\"; \"I bind you\"; they are liable. \"By heaven and earth!\", they are exempt. \"By Alef Daleth\"; \"By Yod He\"; \"By God Almighty\"; \"By The Lord of Hosts; \"By the Merciful and Gracious one\"; \"By the Long Suffering One\"; \"By the One Abounding in Kindness\"; or by any of the substitutes [for the name], they are liable. He who blasphemes by any of them is liable, according to the words of Rabbi Meir. And the Sages exempt him. He who curses his father or mother by any of them is liable according to the words of Rabbi Meir. And the Sages exempt him. He who curses himself or his neighbor by any of them transgresses a negative precept. [If he said,] \"May God smite you\"; or \"Yea, may God smite you\"; this is the curse written in the Torah. \"May [God] not smite you\"; or \"May he bless you\"; Or \"May he do good unto you [if you bear testimony for me]\": Rabbi Meir makes [them] liable, and the Sages exempt [them]."
10. New Testament, Matthew, 17.24-17.27, 23.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17.24. When they had come to Capernaum, those who collected the didrachmas came to Peter, and said, "Doesn't your teacher pay the didrachma? 17.25. He said, "Yes."When he came into the house, Jesus anticipated him, saying, "What do you think, Simon? From whom do the kings of the earth receive toll or tribute? From their sons, or from strangers? 17.26. Peter said to him, "From strangers."Jesus said to him, "Therefore the sons are exempt. 17.27. But, lest we cause them to stumble, go to the sea, and cast a hook, and take up the first fish that comes up. When you have opened its mouth, you will find a stater. Take that, and give it to them for me and you. 23.22. He who swears by heaven, swears by the throne of God, and by him who sits on it.
11. Suetonius, Galba, 2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 3.1.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
alexander the great, and the alexander mosaic Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
barrier Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
boundary Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
cella Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
curtain Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
didyma Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
door Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
entrance Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
flavius josephus Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
galba Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
half-shekel tax Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
helena, and alexander at the issus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
holy of holies Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
house v Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
impietas against, political use of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
jerusalem, temple sacked Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
jerusalem, temples treasures Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
jerusalem Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
jesus, in relation to the temple Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
jesus, on oaths Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
jesus, on the temple tax Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
jesus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
jewish war Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
josephus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
jupiter Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
kraemer, ross, on women in ancient society Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 184
livy Bay, Biblical Heroes and Classical Culture in Christian Late Antiquity: The Historiography, Exemplarity, and Anti-Judaism of Pseudo-Hegesippus (2022) 49
maelius, sp. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
manuscript corrections, interpolations and revisions Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
marcius tremulus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
matthew, on oaths Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
matthew, on the pharisees Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
matthew, on the temple tax Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
minucius augurinus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
naos Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
pasiphae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
pharisees, in matthew' Ganzel and Holtz, Contextualizing Jewish Temples (2020) 161
philoxenus of eretria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
polybius Bay, Biblical Heroes and Classical Culture in Christian Late Antiquity: The Historiography, Exemplarity, and Anti-Judaism of Pseudo-Hegesippus (2022) 49
pompeii, house of the dancing faun Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
priests Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
ptolemies, administration Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
rome, arch of fabius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rome, arch of titus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
rome, capitoline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rome, forum of peace, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
rome, forum of peace, spoils of jewish war adorn Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
rome, forum of peace Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
rome, palatine hill, jewish war spoils kept on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
rome, palatine hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rome, policy towards jews Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
rome, porta trigemina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rome, temple of antoninus and faustina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rome, temple of castor and pollux Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rome, temple of vesta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rome, via sacra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
rufinus Bay, Biblical Heroes and Classical Culture in Christian Late Antiquity: The Historiography, Exemplarity, and Anti-Judaism of Pseudo-Hegesippus (2022) 49
sanctuary Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
seius, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
seleucids, administration Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
seleucus iv Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
septuagint Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
shechemites Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
simon (of heliodorus story) Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
space v Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
statuary, equestrian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
statuary, honorific Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
temple Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
temple of solomon Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
temple v Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
titus, and destruction of the temple Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
titus, his clemency Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137, 279
translation Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
treasury Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 435
valerius corvus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
vespasian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 279
vitellius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 137
wall, middle Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216
wall Weissenrieder, Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances (2016) 216