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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7234
Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 8.143


καὶ σοφίσματα δὲ καὶ λόγους αἰνιγματώδεις διεπέμψατο πρὸς Σολόμωνα ὁ τῶν Τυρίων βασιλεὺς παρακαλῶν, ὅπως αὐτῷ σαφηνίσῃ τούτους καὶ τῆς ἀπορίας τῶν ἐν αὐτοῖς ζητουμένων ἀπαλλάξῃ. τὸν δὲ δεινὸν ὄντα καὶ συνετὸν οὐδὲν τούτων παρῆλθεν, ἀλλὰ πάντα νικήσας τῷ λογισμῷ καὶ μαθὼν αὐτῶν τὴν διάνοιαν ἐφώτισε.Moreover, the king of Tyre sent sophisms and enigmatical sayings to Solomon, and desired he would solve them, and free them from the ambiguity that was in them. Now so sagacious and understanding was Solomon, that none of these problems were too hard for him; but he conquered them all by his reasonings, and discovered their hidden meaning, and brought it to light.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 22.17-24.22 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.1. בְּנִי אִם־יְפַתּוּךָ חַטָּאִים אַל־תֹּבֵא׃ 1.1. מִשְׁלֵי שְׁלֹמֹה בֶן־דָּוִד מֶלֶךְ יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 1.1. The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel;"
2. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 39.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

39.3. he will seek out the hidden meanings of proverbs and be at home with the obscurities of parables. 39.3. the teeth of wild beasts, and scorpions and vipers,and the sword that punishes the ungodly with destruction;
3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.31.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.31.1.  The Gauls are terrifying in aspect and their voices are deep and altogether harsh; when they meet together they converse with few words and in riddles, hinting darkly at things for the most part and using one word when they mean another; and they like to talk in superlatives, to the end that they may extol themselves and depreciate all other men. They are also boasters and threateners and are fond of pompous language, and yet they have sharp wits and are not without cleverness at learning.
4. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 8.148-8.149, 8.194 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.148. He says also, that Solomon, who was then king of Jerusalem, sent riddles to Hiram, and desired to receive the like from him, but that he who could not solve them should pay money to them that did solve them 8.149. and that Hiram accepted the conditions; and when he was not able to solve the riddles proposed by Solomon, he paid a great deal of money for his fine; but that he afterward did solve the proposed riddles by means of Abdemon, a man of Tyre; and that Hiram proposed other riddles, which, when Solomon could not solve, he paid back a great deal of money to Hiram.” This it is which Dius wrote. 8.194. And as he grew into years, and his reason became weaker by length of time, it was not sufficient to recall to his mind the institutions of his own country; so he still more and more condemned his own God, and continued to regard the gods that his marriages had introduced;
5. Various, Anthologia Latina, 14



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
claudius, roman emperor, expulsion of jews from rome by Feldman, Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered (2006) 441, 630
david Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
dissimulation, didactic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 230
dissimulation, socratic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 230
dissimulation Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 230
divine speech, enigmatic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 230, 233
dream Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
elijah Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
enigmatic speech, graeco-roman oracular and prophetic, pedagogic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 230, 233
forgiveness Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
gods will Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
hannah Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
izates Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
jacob Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
jephthah Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
joshua Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
leah Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
priest Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
riddle, riddling, pedagogic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 230
riddle, riddling, popular Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 230
sacrifice Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
samuel Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
saul Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269
vow' Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 269