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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7234
Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 2.263


ποιεῖται δ' αὐτὸν υἱὸν καὶ μίαν τῶν θυγατέρων πρὸς γάμον δίδωσι τῶν τε θρεμμάτων, ἐν τούτοις γὰρ ἡ πᾶσα κτῆσις τὸ παλαιὸν ἦν τοῖς βαρβάροις, ἀποδείκνυσιν ἐπιμελητὴν καὶ δεσπότην.So he made him his son, and gave him one of his daughters in marriage; and appointed him to be the guardian and superintendent over his cattle; for of old, all the wealth of the barbarians was in those cattle.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 3.1-3.2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1. וְעַתָּה לְכָה וְאֶשְׁלָחֲךָ אֶל־פַּרְעֹה וְהוֹצֵא אֶת־עַמִּי בְנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל מִמִּצְרָיִם׃ 3.1. וּמֹשֶׁה הָיָה רֹעֶה אֶת־צֹאן יִתְרוֹ חֹתְנוֹ כֹּהֵן מִדְיָן וַיִּנְהַג אֶת־הַצֹּאן אַחַר הַמִּדְבָּר וַיָּבֹא אֶל־הַר הָאֱלֹהִים חֹרֵבָה׃ 3.2. וַיֵּרָא מַלְאַךְ יְהֹוָה אֵלָיו בְּלַבַּת־אֵשׁ מִתּוֹךְ הַסְּנֶה וַיַּרְא וְהִנֵּה הַסְּנֶה בֹּעֵר בָּאֵשׁ וְהַסְּנֶה אֵינֶנּוּ אֻכָּל׃ 3.2. וְשָׁלַחְתִּי אֶת־יָדִי וְהִכֵּיתִי אֶת־מִצְרַיִם בְּכֹל נִפְלְאֹתַי אֲשֶׁר אֶעֱשֶׂה בְּקִרְבּוֹ וְאַחֲרֵי־כֵן יְשַׁלַּח אֶתְכֶם׃ 3.1. Now Moses was keeping the flock of Jethro his father-in-law, the priest of Midian; and he led the flock to the farthest end of the wilderness, and came to the mountain of God, unto Horeb." 3.2. And the angel of the LORD appeared unto him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush; and he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the bush was not consumed."
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.58, 1.60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.60. And after his marriage, Moses took his father-in-law's herds and tended them, being thus instructed in the lessons proper to qualify him for becoming the leader of a people, for the business of a shepherd is a preparation for the office of a king to any one who is destined to preside over that most manageable of all flocks, mankind, just as hunting is a good training-school for men of warlike dispositions; for they who are practising with a view to learning the management of an army, previously study the science of hunting, brute animals being as some raw material exposed to their attacks in order for them to practise the art of commanding on each occasion of war or of peace
3. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 2.264-2.265, 4.40, 4.42-4.43, 8.111 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.264. 1. Now Moses, when he had obtained the favor of Jethro, for that was one of the names of Raguel, staid there and fed his flock; but some time afterward, taking his station at the mountain called Sinai, he drove his flocks thither to feed them. 2.265. Now this is the highest of all the mountains thereabout, and the best for pasturage, the herbage being there good; and it had not been before fed upon, because of the opinion men had that God dwelt there, the shepherds not daring to ascend up to it; and here it was that a wonderful prodigy happened to Moses; 4.42. When I lived a private quiet life, I left those good things which, by my own diligence, and by thy counsel, I enjoyed with Raguel my father-in-law; and I gave myself up to this people, and underwent many miseries on their account. I also bore great labors at first, in order to obtain liberty for them, and now in order to their preservation; and have always showed myself ready to assist them in every distress of theirs. 4.43. Now, therefore, since I am suspected by those very men whose being is owing to my labors, come thou, as it is reasonable to hope thou wilt; thou, I say, who showedst me that fire at mount Sinai, and madest me to hear its voice, and to see the several wonders which that place afforded thou who commandedst me to go to Egypt, and declare thy will to this people; 8.111. 3. When the king had thus discoursed to the multitude, he looked again towards the temple, and lifting up his right hand to the multitude, he said, “It is not possible by what men can do to return sufficient thanks to God for his benefits bestowed upon them, for the Deity stands in need of nothing, and is above any such requital; but so far as we have been made superior, O Lord, to other animals by thee, it becomes us to bless thy Majesty, and it is necessary for us to return thee thanks for what thou hast bestowed upon our house, and on the Hebrew people;


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
claudius, roman emperor, expulsion of jews from rome by Feldman, Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered (2006) 502, 579, 585, 605, 754
egypt, egyptians, moses as egyptian Westwood, Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives (2023) 95
good things Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
happiness/happy life Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
isaac Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
joshua Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
maximus of tyre Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
moses Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
naomi Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
noah Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
solomon Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250
thanksgiving' Jonquière, Prayer in Josephus Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (2007) 250