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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6979
Jerome, On Illustrious Men, 22
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 4.49.1-4.49.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2. Athanasius, Against The Pagans, 9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

3. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.23.18, 4.8.2-4.8.3, 4.14.2, 4.21, 4.24 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.23.18. And one of them, who was a fuller, took the club with which he beat out clothes and struck the just man on the head. And thus he suffered martyrdom. And they buried him on the spot, by the temple, and his monument still remains by the temple. He became a true witness, both to Jews and Greeks, that Jesus is the Christ. And immediately Vespasian besieged them. 4.8.2. He records in five books the true tradition of apostolic doctrine in a most simple style, and he indicates the time in which he flourished when he writes as follows concerning those that first set up idols: To whom they erected cenotaphs and temples, as is done to the present day. Among whom is also Antinoüs, a slave of the Emperor Hadrian, in whose honor are celebrated also the Antinoian games, which were instituted in our day. For he [i.e. Hadrian] also founded a city named after Antinoüs, and appointed prophets. 4.8.3. At the same time also Justin, a genuine lover of the true philosophy, was still continuing to busy himself with Greek literature. He indicates this time in the Apology which he addressed to Antonine, where he writes as follows: We do not think it out of place to mention here Antinoüs also, who lived in our day, and whom all were driven by fear to worship as a god, although they knew who he was and whence he came. 4.14.2. And the same writer gives another account of Polycarp which I feel constrained to add to that which has been already related in regard to him. The account is taken from the third book of Irenaeus' work Against Heresies, and is as follows:
4. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.36 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.36. But as he next introduces the case of the favourite of Adrian (I refer to the accounts regarding the youth Antinous, and the honours paid him by the inhabitants of the city of Antinous in Egypt), and imagines that the honour paid to him falls little short of that which we render to Jesus, let us show in what a spirit of hostility this statement is made. For what is there in common between a life lived among the favourites of Adrian, by one who did not abstain even from unnatural lusts, and that of the venerable Jesus, against whom even they who brought countless other charges, and who told so many falsehoods, were not able to allege that He manifested, even in the slightest degree, any tendency to what was licentious? Nay, further, if one were to investigate, in a spirit of truth and impartiality, the stories relating to Antinous, he would find that it was due to the magical arts and rites of the Egyptians that there was even the appearance of his performing anything (marvellous) in the city which bears his name, and that too only after his decease - an effect which is said to have been produced in other temples by the Egyptians, and those who are skilled in the arts which they practise. For they set up in certain places demons claiming prophetic or healing power, and which frequently torture those who seem to have committed any mistake about ordinary kinds of food, or about touching the dead body of a man, that they may have the appearance of alarming the uneducated multitude. of this nature is the being that is considered to be a god in Antinoopolis in Egypt, whose (reputed) virtues are the lying inventions of some who live by the gain derived therefrom; while others, deceived by the demon placed there, and others again convicted by a weak conscience, actually think that they are paying a divine penalty inflicted by Antinous. of such a nature also are the mysteries which they perform, and the seeming predictions which they utter. Far different from such are those of Jesus. For it was no company of sorcerers, paying court to a king or ruler at his bidding, who seemed to have made him a god; but the Architect of the universe Himself, in keeping with the marvellously persuasive power of His words, commended Him as worthy of honour, not only to those men who were well disposed, but to demons also, and other unseen powers, which even at the present time show that they either fear the name of Jesus as that of a being of superior power, or reverentially accept Him as their legal ruler. For if the commendation had not been given Him by God, the demons would not have withdrawn from those whom they had assailed, in obedience to the mere mention of His name.
5. Prudentius, Contra Symmachum, 1.271-1.277 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

6. Epigraphy, Igur, 98



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antinous, as oracular god Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous, hadrians role in cults establishment Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous, in christian polemics Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous, lunar association Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous, monte pincio obelisk text Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous, on contorniates Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous, role of prophētai in cult Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous, worship in late antiquity Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
antinous Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
cult personnel (egyptian and greco-egyptian), prophētēs Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
eusebius of caesarea Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 90
hadrian, and antinous Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
hegesippus, sources Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 90
hegesippus Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 90
hypomnemata Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 90
jewish christianity Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 90
monte pincio obelisk' Renberg, Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World (2017) 517
ὑπόμνημα Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 90