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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7003
Jerome, Letters, 10.3
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 30.15 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

30.15. כִּי כֹה־אָמַר אֲדֹנָי יְהוִה קְדוֹשׁ יִשְׂרָאֵל בְּשׁוּבָה וָנַחַת תִּוָּשֵׁעוּן בְּהַשְׁקֵט וּבְבִטְחָה תִּהְיֶה גְּבוּרַתְכֶם וְלֹא אֲבִיתֶם׃ 30.15. For thus said the Lord GOD, the Holy One of Israel: In sitting still and rest shall ye be saved, in quietness and in confidence shall be your strength; And ye would not."
2. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Athanasius, Epistula Festalis Xxxix (Fragmentum In Collectione Canonum), 39 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4. Nag Hammadi, The Exegesis On The Soul, 136.6-136.8, 136.17-136.18 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Nag Hammadi, The Gospel of Philip, 56.18-56.19, 56.26-56.30, 57.12, 57.18, 58.20-58.22, 66.16-66.20, 67.17-67.18, 73.3-73.5 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Nag Hammadi, The Teachings of Silvanus, 90.33 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Nag Hammadi, The Treatise On The Resurrection, 48.3-48.4, 49.9-49.25, 49.30-49.33 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Nag Hammadi, The Tripartite Tractate, 104.20-104.30, 132.20 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Origen, On First Principles, 1.2.2-1.2.3, 1.2.10, 1.6.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.2.2. Let no one, however, imagine that we mean anything impersonal when we call Him the wisdom of God; or suppose, for example, that we understand Him to be, not a living being endowed with wisdom, but something which makes men wise, giving itself to, and implanting itself in, the minds of those who are made capable of receiving His virtues and intelligence. If, then, it is once rightly understood that the only-begotten Son of God is His wisdom hypostatically existing, I know not whether our curiosity ought to advance beyond this, or entertain any suspicion that that ὑπόστασις or substantia contains anything of a bodily nature, since everything that is corporeal is distinguished either by form, or color, or magnitude. And who in his sound senses ever sought for form, or color, or size, in wisdom, in respect of its being wisdom? And who that is capable of entertaining reverential thoughts or feelings regarding God, can suppose or believe that God the Father ever existed, even for a moment of time, without having generated this Wisdom? For in that case he must say either that God was unable to generate Wisdom before He produced her, so that He afterwards called into being her who formerly did not exist, or that He possessed the power indeed, but — what cannot be said of God without impiety — was unwilling to use it; both of which suppositions, it is patent to all, are alike absurd and impious: for they amount to this, either that God advanced from a condition of inability to one of ability, or that, although possessed of the power, He concealed it, and delayed the generation of Wisdom. Wherefore we have always held that God is the Father of His only-begotten Son, who was born indeed of Him, and derives from Him what He is, but without any beginning, not only such as may be measured by any divisions of time, but even that which the mind alone can contemplate within itself, or behold, so to speak, with the naked powers of the understanding. And therefore we must believe that Wisdom was generated before any beginning that can be either comprehended or expressed. And since all the creative power of the coming creation was included in this very existence of Wisdom (whether of those things which have an original or of those which have a derived existence), having been formed beforehand and arranged by the power of foreknowledge; on account of these very creatures which had been described, as it were, and prefigured in Wisdom herself, does Wisdom say, in the words of Solomon, that she was created the beginning of the ways of God, inasmuch as she contained within herself either the beginnings, or forms, or species of all creation. 1.2.3. Now, in the same way in which we have understood that Wisdom was the beginning of the ways of God, and is said to be created, forming beforehand and containing within herself the species and beginnings of all creatures, must we understand her to be the Word of God, because of her disclosing to all other beings, i.e., to universal creation, the nature of the mysteries and secrets which are contained within the divine wisdom; and on this account she is called the Word, because she is, as it were, the interpreter of the secrets of the mind. And therefore that language which is found in the Acts of Paul, where it is said that here is the Word a living being, appears to me to be rightly used. John, however, with more sublimity and propriety, says in the beginning of his Gospel, when defining God by a special definition to be the Word, And God was the Word, and this was in the beginning with God. Let him, then, who assigns a beginning to the Word or Wisdom of God, take care that he be not guilty of impiety against the unbegotten Father Himself, seeing he denies that He had always been a Father, and had generated the Word, and had possessed wisdom in all preceding periods, whether they be called times or ages, or anything else that can be so entitled. 1.6.2. Seeing, then, that such is the end, when all enemies will be subdued to Christ, when death — the last enemy — shall be destroyed, and when the kingdom shall be delivered up by Christ (to whom all things are subject) to God the Father; let us, I say, from such an end as this, contemplate the beginnings of things. For the end is always like the beginning: and, therefore, as there is one end to all things, so ought we to understand that there was one beginning; and as there is one end to many things, so there spring from one beginning many differences and varieties, which again, through the goodness of God, and by subjection to Christ, and through the unity of the Holy Spirit, are recalled to one end, which is like the beginning: all those, viz., who, bending the knee at the name of Jesus, make known by so doing their subjection to Him: and these are they who are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth: by which three classes the whole universe of things is pointed out, those, viz., who from that one beginning were arranged, each according to the diversity of his conduct, among the different orders, in accordance with their desert; for there was no goodness in them by essential being, as in God and His Christ, and in the Holy Spirit. For in the Trinity alone, which is the author of all things, does goodness exist in virtue of essential being; while others possess it as an accidental and perishable quality, and only then enjoy blessedness, when they participate in holiness and wisdom, and in divinity itself. But if they neglect and despise such participation, then is each one, by fault of his own slothfulness, made, one more rapidly, another more slowly, one in a greater, another in a less degree, the cause of his own downfall. And since, as we have remarked, the lapse by which an individual falls away from his position is characterized by great diversity, according to the movements of the mind and will, one man falling with greater ease, another with more difficulty, into a lower condition; in this is to be seen the just judgment of the providence of God, that it should happen to every one according to the diversity of his conduct, in proportion to the desert of his declension and defection. Certain of those, indeed, who remained in that beginning which we have described as resembling the end which is to come, obtained, in the ordering and arrangement of the world, the rank of angels; others that of influences, others of principalities, others of powers, that they may exercise power over those who need to have power upon their head. Others, again, received the rank of thrones, having the office of judging or ruling those who require this; others dominion, doubtless, over slaves; all of which are conferred by Divine Providence in just and impartial judgment according to their merits, and to the progress which they had made in the participation and imitation of God. But those who have been removed from their primal state of blessedness have not been removed irrecoverably, but have been placed under the rule of those holy and blessed orders which we have described; and by availing themselves of the aid of these, and being remoulded by salutary principles and discipline, they may recover themselves, and be restored to their condition of happiness. From all which I am of opinion, so far as I can see, that this order of the human race has been appointed in order that in the future world, or in ages to come, when there shall be the new heavens and new earth, spoken of by Isaiah, it may be restored to that unity promised by the Lord Jesus in His prayer to God the Father on behalf of His disciples: I do not pray for these alone, but for all who shall believe in Me through their word: that they all may be one, as You, Father, are in Me, and I in You, that they also may be one in Us; and again, when He says: That they may be one, even as We are one; I in them, and You in Me, that they may be made perfect in one. And this is further confirmed by the language of the Apostle Paul: Until we all come in the unity of the faith to a perfect man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ. And in keeping with this is the declaration of the same apostle, when he exhorts us, who even in the present life are placed in the Church, in which is the form of that kingdom which is to come, to this same similitude of unity: That you all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you; but that you be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment.
10. Epiphanius, Ancoratus, 82.3 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

11. Socrates Scholasticus, Ecclesiastical History, 6.7 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

6.7. The question had been started a little before, whether God is a corporeal existence, and has the form of man; or whether he is incorporeal, and without human or, generally speaking, any other bodily shape? From this question arose strifes and contentions among a very great number of persons, some favoring one opinion on the subject, and others patronizing the opposite. Very many of the more simple ascetics asserted that God is corporeal, and has a human figure: but most others condemn their judgment, and contended that God is incorporeal, and free of all form whatever. With these latter Theophilus bishop of Alexandria agreed so thoroughly that in the church before all the people he inveighed against those who attributed to God a human form, expressly teaching that the Divine Being is wholly incorporeal. When the Egyptian ascetics were apprised of this, they left their monasteries and came to Alexandria; where they excited a tumult against the bishop, accusing him of impiety, and threatening to put him to death. Theophilus becoming aware of his danger, after some consideration had recourse to this expedient to extricate himself from the threatened death. Going to the monks, he in a conciliatory tone thus addressed them: 'In seeing you, I behold the face of God.' The utterance of this saying moderated the fury of these men and they replied: 'If you really admit that God's countece is such as ours, anathematize Origen's book; for some drawing arguments from them oppose themselves to our opinion. If you will not do this, expect to be treated by us as an impious person, and the enemy of God.' 'But as far as I am concerned,' said Theophilus, 'I will readily do what you require: and be not angry with me, for I myself also disapprove of Origen's works, and consider those who countece them deserving of censure.' Thus he succeeded in appeasing and sending away the monks at that time; and probably the whole dispute respecting this subject would have been set at rest, had it not been for another circumstance which happened immediately after. Over the monasteries in Egypt there were four devout persons as superintendents named Dioscorus, Ammonius, Eusebius, and Euthymius: these men were brothers, and had the appellation of 'the Tall Monks' given them on account of their stature. They were moreover distinguished both for the sanctity of their lives, and the extent of their erudition, and for these reasons their reputation was very high at Alexandria. Theophilus in particular, the prelate of that city, loved and honored them exceedingly: insomuch that he constituted one of them, Dioscorus, bishop of Hermopolis against his will, having forcibly drawn him from his retreat. Two of the others he entreated to continue with him, and with difficulty prevailed upon them to do so; still by the exercise of his authority as bishop he accomplished his purpose: when therefore he had invested them with the clerical office, he committed to their charge the management of ecclesiastical affairs. They, constrained by necessity, performed the duties thus imposed on them successfully; nevertheless they were dissatisfied because they were unable to follow philosophical pursuits and ascetic exercises. And as in process of time, they thought they were being spiritually injured, observing the bishop to be devoted to gain, and greedily intent on the acquisition of wealth, and according to the common saying 'leaving no stone unturned' for the sake of gain, they refused to remain with him any longer, declaring that they loved solitude, and greatly preferred it to living in the city. As long as he was ignorant of the true motive for their departure, he earnestly begged them to abide with him; but when he perceived that they were dissatisfied with his conduct, he became excessively irritated, and threatened to do them all kinds of mischief. But they making little account of his menaces retired into the desert; upon which Theophilus, who was evidently of a hasty and maligt temperament, raised not a small clamor against them, and by every contrivance earnestly sought to do them injury. He also conceived a dislike against their brother Dioscorus, bishop of Hermopolis. He was moreover extremely annoyed at the esteem and veneration in which he was held by the ascetics. Being aware, however, that he would be able to do no harm to these persons unless he could stir up hostility in the minds of the monks against them, he used this artifice to effect it. He well knew that these men in their frequent theological discussions with him, had maintained that the Deity was incorporeal, and by no means had a human form; because [they argued] such a constitution would involve the necessary accompaniment of human passions. Now this has been demonstrated by the ancient writers and especially Origen. Theophilus, however though entertaining the very same opinion respecting the Divine nature, yet to gratify his vindictive feelings, did not hesitate to pervert what he and they had rightly taught: but imposed upon the majority of the monks, men who were sincere but 'rude in speech,' 2 Corinthians 11:6 the greater part of whom were quite illiterate. Sending letters to the monasteries in the desert, he advised them not to give heed either to Dioscorus or to his brothers, inasmuch as they affirmed that God had not a body. 'Whereas,' said he, 'according to the sacred Scripture God has eyes, ears, hands, and feet, as men have; but the partisans of Dioscorus, being followers of Origen, introduce the blasphemous dogma that God has neither eyes, ears, feet, nor hands.' By this sophism he took advantage of the simplicity of these monks and thus a hot dissension was stirred up among them. Such as had a cultivated mind indeed were not beguiled by this plausibility, and therefore still adhere to Dioscorus and Origen; but the more ignorant who greatly exceeded the others in number, inflamed by an ardent zeal without knowledge, immediately raised an outcry against their brethren. A division being thus made, both parties branded each other as impious; and some listening to Theophilus called their brethren 'Origenists,' and 'impious' and the others termed those who were convinced by Theophilus 'Anthropomorphit .' On this account violent altercation arose, and an inextinguishable war between the monks. Theophilus on receiving intimation of the success of his device, went to Nitria where the monasteries are, accompanied by a multitude of persons, and armed the monks against Dioscorus and his brethren; who being in danger of losing their lives, made their escape with great difficulty. While these things were in progress in Egypt John bishop of Constantinople was ignorant of them, but flourished in eloquence and became increasingly celebrated for his discourses. Moreover he first enlarged the prayers contained in the nocturnal hymns, for the reason I am about to assign.
12. Jerome, On Illustrious Men, 3 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

13. Jerome, Letters, 5.2, 10.3, 22.30 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14. Jerome, Letters, 5.2, 10.3, 22.30 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

15. Jerome, Letters, 5.2, 22.30 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

16. Augustine, Letters, 31.7-31.8 (7th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)

17. Anon., History of The Monks In Egypt, 3.2

18. Palladius of Aspuna, Lausiac History, 32.6



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of paul Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 233
acts of peter and the twelve apostles Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
acts of the apostles Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220
adam Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 243, 258, 259
al-mudil codex Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 217, 218
alexandria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 217
alexandrian orthodoxy Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 247, 248, 249, 252, 267
allegorical exegesis Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 239, 242, 246, 254, 255, 256
allogenes Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
ammon, bishop Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 247, 248
ammonas Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 257
anchorites Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235, 237, 251, 260
angels Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234
antony, saint (see also life of st. antony), letters of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238, 241, 257
antony, saint (see also life of st. antony) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 259, 260
apatheia Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 260
apocalypse of adam Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 242, 261
apocalypse of elijah Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220, 233
apocalypse of james, first Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
apocalypse of james, second Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
apocalypse of paul Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
apocalypse of peter Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261, 267
apocrypha), censorship of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 239, 249
apocrypha), networks of exchange Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203, 204, 205, 206, 212, 213, 214
apocrypha), production of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 207
apocryphal books (see also extra-canonical books) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 214, 233, 235, 236, 240, 246, 249, 252, 256, 262, 263, 265
apocryphon of isaiah Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236
apocryphon of james Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236
apocryphon of john Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 210, 220, 227, 236, 242, 259, 260, 261
apocryphon of moses Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236
apokatastasis Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 239, 242, 264
apollonius, pachomian abbot Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 251, 252
apology of phileas Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
arians Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 264
ascent to heaven Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 253, 260, 261
asceticism Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 240, 250, 253, 256
asclepius Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205
ashmunein (see also hermopolis) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220
athanasius, archbishop of alexandria, festal letter of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 235, 236, 249, 252
athanasius, archbishop of alexandria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 248, 250, 252, 264, 265
augustine Larsen and Rubenson, Monastic Education in Late Antiquity: The Transformation of Classical 'Paideia' (2018) 318; Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205
authoritative teaching Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 243
baptism Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234
bel and the dragon, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 231
bible, the / scripture Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 204, 231, 236, 242, 249, 263, 264, 266
bishops Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 248
bodmer, martin Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224
bohairic dialect Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 219, 228
book of thomas Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 206, 209, 260
cain Larsen and Rubenson, Monastic Education in Late Antiquity: The Transformation of Classical 'Paideia' (2018) 318
canon Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 249, 252, 265
canopus Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 215
caves Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 251
cenobites Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 231, 235, 256, 261, 264, 267
chester beatty codices ix, x, and xii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 231
christ, incarnation of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 254
christ, passion of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 254, 258
christ Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 243, 245, 248, 257, 258, 261
clairvoyance (see also prophecy visions) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 258, 259
colossians, pauline epistle to Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 244
constantinople Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238
corinthians Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228, 233
crum Larsen and Rubenson, Monastic Education in Late Antiquity: The Transformation of Classical 'Paideia' (2018) 318
cryptography Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 206, 212
cyril of alexandria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 243, 264
daniel, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220, 231
demons Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 253, 258, 259, 260, 264, 266
deuteronomy Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220, 221
dialect mixture Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 216, 217, 228, 231
dialogue of the savior Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
dioscorus, archbishop of alexandria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 237, 240, 249, 250, 263, 264
discourse on the eighth and ninth Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 261
dishna papers) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer ii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 225, 226, 227, 229
dishna papers, p. bodmer iii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228, 229
dishna papers, p. bodmer ix Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer v Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer vii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer viii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer x Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer xi Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer xii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer xiii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer xiv–xv Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 223, 225, 226, 227
dishna papers, p. bodmer xix Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 216
dishna papers, p. bodmer xliii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 232, 233
dishna papers, p. bodmer xvi Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 226, 227
dishna papers, p. bodmer xx Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
dishna papers, p. bodmer xxi Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228, 229, 230
dishna papers, p. bodmer xxiii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228, 229, 230
dishna papers, p. bodmer xxxix Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224
dishna papers Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 210, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233
dishna plain Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224
egypt, lower Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 215, 247
egypt, middle Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236, 237
egypt, upper (see also thebaid) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 208, 215, 216, 217, 219, 224, 231, 235, 237, 240, 241, 262, 263, 268
enoch, first book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 231
enoch Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236
ephesians, pauline epistle to Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 244
epiphanius, bishop of salamis, ancoratus of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238
epiphanius, bishop of salamis, panarion of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238
epiphanius, bishop of salamis Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238, 239, 243, 244, 245, 247, 250, 255
epiphanius, monastery of at thebes Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212
esther, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 231
eucharist Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 240, 245, 246, 264
evagrius ponticus Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238, 241, 250, 260
eve Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 243, 258, 259
evodius of rome Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 255, 263, 266
exegesis), manuscripts of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 207, 208, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233
exegesis), memorization of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 253, 254, 255
exegesis), sahidic translations of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 215, 216
exegesis) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 234, 239, 246, 247, 253, 257, 258
exegesis on the soul Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 242, 243, 257, 258
exodus, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 226, 227
extra-canonical books (see also apocryphal books) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 255, 265, 266
ezekiel, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 231, 258
fayumic dialect Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 219
first peter Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
genesis, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220, 222, 223, 228, 239, 242, 264, 266
george, arian archbishop of alexandria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 252
glazier codex Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 217, 218
gnosticism Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 263, 264, 266
gnostics Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 207, 223, 228, 231, 234, 235, 241, 256, 265
god Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 243, 257, 259, 260
gongessos Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 206
gospel of john Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 225, 226, 227, 228, 229
gospel of luke Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 225, 226
gospel of matthew Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 216, 218, 219
gospel of philip Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 226, 242, 244, 245, 246
gospel of thomas Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220, 226, 261
hathor monastery Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236, 237
heresiologists Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 239
hermes trismegistus Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 261
hermopolis (see also ashmunein) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220
holy spirit, the Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 241, 259, 260
horsiesios, pachomian archimandrite Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224, 251, 252, 257, 258
hosea, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 258
hypostasis of the archons Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220, 242, 259
hypsicrates Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203
isaiah, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228, 229, 230
jabal abu mana Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224, 225
jabal al-tarif / gebel et-tarif Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224, 256, 267
james, brother of jesus Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
jerome, biblical interpretation Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1159
jerome, competence in hebrew Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1159
jerome, generally Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1159
jerome, textual criticism Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 1159
jerome Larsen and Rubenson, Monastic Education in Late Antiquity: The Transformation of Classical 'Paideia' (2018) 318; Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203, 204, 215, 244, 245
jerusalem Larsen and Rubenson, Monastic Education in Late Antiquity: The Transformation of Classical 'Paideia' (2018) 318; Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238, 258
jesus (see also christ) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 259, 260, 261, 263
john cassian Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 213
jonah, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 220, 221
joshua, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228, 229, 230
jude, epistle of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
labla monastery Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 237
latopolis (see also esna) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 214
letter of peter to philip Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
life of apa onnophrius Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 260
life of pachomius, arabic life Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 260
life of pachomius, composition and redaction of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 248, 254
life of pachomius, fifth sahidic life Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 254
life of pachomius, first greek life / g Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 248, 253, 254, 255, 256
life of pachomius, sahidic lives Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 248
life of pachomius Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 249, 250, 251
life of st. antony Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 259
liturgy (see also eucharist) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 214, 237
macarius the egyptian Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 257
mani Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235
manichaeans Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235
melitians Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 264
melito of sardis Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228, 231
metanoia, pachomian monastery at Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 215
micah, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 254
migration Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 214, 215, 216, 217, 231
nag hammadi codices, cartonnage of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236, 256, 267
nag hammadi codices, codex i Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 211, 213, 223, 225, 228, 242
nag hammadi codices, codex ii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 207, 208, 209, 213, 220, 223, 225, 228, 255, 258, 259
nag hammadi codices, codex iii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 207, 208, 209, 215, 226, 227, 229, 230
nag hammadi codices, codex iv Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 211, 213, 219
nag hammadi codices, codex ix Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 211, 213, 226
nag hammadi codices, codex v Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 211, 213, 226
nag hammadi codices, codex vi Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 211, 213, 214, 223, 225, 226
nag hammadi codices, codex vii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 206, 207, 208, 209, 211, 213, 220, 226, 238, 247, 255
nag hammadi codices, codex viii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 206, 208, 209, 211, 213, 219, 233
nag hammadi codices, codex x Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 211, 223, 225
nag hammadi codices, codex xi Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 211, 213, 223, 225
nag hammadi codices, codex xii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209
nag hammadi codices, codex xiii Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 223, 225
nag hammadi codices, codicology of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233
nag hammadi codices, colophons of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 255, 256, 267
nag hammadi codices, covers of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 209
nag hammadi codices, dimensions of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 225
nag hammadi codices, discovery of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 256
nag hammadi codices, quires of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 210, 211, 225
nag hammadi codices, scribes of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233
nag hammadi codices, sub-groups of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 231
nag hammadi texts, dialects of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 208, 214, 215, 216, 217
nag hammadi texts, transmission of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 214, 215, 216, 217, 231, 262
nativity of mary Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
nestorian controversy Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 264
nile, the Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 214, 262
nitria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 247
ode of solomon Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
of white monastery, libraries of)' Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 204
of white monastery, libraries of) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 263
on the origin of the world Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 242, 258, 259
origen Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 247, 248, 249, 250, 263
origenist controversy Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 255, 263, 264
origenists Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 256
oxcal calibration Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 218
oxyrhynchite dialect Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 217, 218
oxyrhynchus Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 217
pachomians, administrators (oikonomoi) of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212
pachomians, clergy among Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236, 237
pachomians, conflicts among Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 250, 251, 252
pachomians, education of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 253, 254, 255
pachomians, exegesis of scripture by Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 254, 255, 256, 258
pachomians, libraries of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 211, 231, 253
pachomians, praecepta / rules of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 213, 237, 249, 251, 253, 254
pachomians, private property among Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 213, 251
pachomians, scribes and scriptoria of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 211, 212, 213, 215, 216
pachomians Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 206, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 224, 225, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 259, 261, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267
pachomius (see also life of pachomius), death of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235, 251
pachomius (see also life of pachomius), letters of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 215, 224
pachomius (see also life of pachomius) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 237, 248, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 257, 260
palladius Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212
panopolis (see also shmin) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 214, 224, 240
paralipomena Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 248, 249, 250
paraphrase of shem Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
patchelphius Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 247
paul of tamma Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 257
paul the apostle Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 253, 255, 259, 261
pbow (see also faw qibli) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 212, 225, 231, 247, 256
peter the apostle Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
philosophy Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 235
prayer Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 207, 234, 254, 257, 260, 264
prayer of thanksgiving Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 204, 205
priests Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236, 237
priscillian of avila Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 255, 263, 266
psalms Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203, 228, 253
radiocarbon dating Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 209
repentance Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 257
resurrection Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 238, 239, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 254, 255, 256, 264
romans, pauls epistle to Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 216
rufinus Larsen and Rubenson, Monastic Education in Late Antiquity: The Transformation of Classical 'Paideia' (2018) 318; Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 245, 257
sahidic dialect Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 215, 216, 220, 229
sansnos, apa, priest and monk Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 236, 237
scheide codex Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 217, 218
scriptoria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 211, 212, 213, 217
second peter Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 228
shem Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261
sheneset (see also chenoboskion) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 237, 256
shenoute, and it happened one day Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 240
shenoute, i am amazed Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 240, 243
shenoute, so listen Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 258
shenoute, who speaks through the prophet Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 244
shenoute Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 205, 237, 239, 240, 241, 244, 246, 249, 250, 255, 263, 264
souls Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 239, 241, 242, 243, 246, 253, 257, 258, 264
spiritual names Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 206
spiritual progress Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 253, 255
stephen of thebes Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 257
susanna, book of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 231
tabennesi Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 225, 234, 248
tabennesiots (see also pachomians) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234
teachings of silvanus Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 241, 256, 257
tertullian Larsen and Rubenson, Monastic Education in Late Antiquity: The Transformation of Classical 'Paideia' (2018) 318; Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 203
testimony of truth Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 242
thebaid Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 216, 237, 238, 244, 247
thebes Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224
theodore, pachomian archimandrite Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224, 247, 252, 254, 255, 257, 258
theophilus, archbishop of alexandria, festal letter of Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 243, 252
theophilus, archbishop of alexandria Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 238, 239, 240, 242, 247, 264
thmoushons Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 251
treatise on the resurrection Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 213, 244, 255, 256
tripartite tractate Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 213, 242
urban intellectuals Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 217
visions (see also clairvoyance prophecy) Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 234, 253, 254, 261, 264, 266
visions of dorotheus Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 233
wadi sheikh ali Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 224
wisdom of jesus christ Lundhaug and Jenott, The Monastic Origins of the Nag Hammadi Codices (2015) 261