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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



12059
Isocrates, Orations, 9.57
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.455 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.455. /shall lead thee away weeping and rob thee of thy day of freedom. Then haply in Argos shalt thou ply the loom at another s bidding, or bear water from Messeis or Hypereia, sorely against thy will, and strong necessity shall be laid upon thee. And some man shall say as he beholdeth thee weeping:
2. Herodotus, Histories, 3.142, 7.192 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.142. Now Samos was ruled by Maeandrius, son of Maeandrius, who had authority delegated by Polycrates. He wanted to be the justest of men, but that was impossible. ,For when he learned of Polycrates' death, first he set up an altar to Zeus the Liberator and marked out around it that sacred enclosure which is still to be seen in the suburb of the city; when this had been done, he called an assembly of all the citizens, and addressed them thus: ,“To me, as you know, have come Polycrates' scepter and all of his power, and it is in my power now to rule you. But I, so far as it lies in me, shall not do myself what I blame in my neighbor. I always disliked it that Polycrates or any other man should lord it over men like himself. Polycrates has fulfilled his destiny, and inviting you to share his power I proclaim equality. ,Only I claim for my own privilege that six talents of Polycrates' wealth be set apart for my use, and that I and my descendants keep the priesthood of Zeus the Liberator, whose temple I have founded, and now I give you freedom.” ,Such was Maeandrius' promise to the Samians. But one of them arose and answered: “But you are not even fit to rule us, low-born and vermin, but you had better give an account of the monies that you have handled.” 7.192. The storm, then, ceased on the fourth day. Now the scouts stationed on the headlands of Euboea ran down and told the Hellenes all about the shipwreck on the second day after the storm began. ,After hearing this they prayed to Poseidon as their savior and poured libations. Then they hurried to Artemisium hoping to find few ships opposing them. So they came to Artemisium a second time and made their station there. From that time on they call Poseidon their savior.
3. Isocrates, Orations, 15.94, 18.61, 18.65 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.71, 2.71.2, 3.58 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.71.2. ‘Archidamus and Lacedaemonians, in invading the Plataean territory, you do what is wrong in itself, and worthy neither of yourselves nor of the fathers who begot you. Pausanias, son of Cleombrotus, your countryman, after freeing Hellas from the Medes with the help of those Hellenes who were willing to undertake the risk of the battle fought near our city, offered sacrifice to Zeus the Liberator in the market-place of Plataea, and calling all the allies together restored to the Plataeans their city and territory, and declared it independent and inviolate against aggression or conquest. Should any such be attempted, the allies present were to help according to their power.
5. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.2, 4.3.11 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.2. Presently Thrasybulus set out from Thebes with about seventy companions and seized Phyle, a strong fortress. And the Thirty marched out from the city against him with the Three Thousand and the cavalry, the weather being very fine indeed. When they reached Phyle, some of the young men were so bold as to attack the fortress at once, but they accomplished nothing and suffered some wounds themselves before they retired. 4.3.11. For it was near 394 B.C. Cnidos that the fleets sailed against one another, and Pharnabazus, who was admiral, was with the Phoenician ships, while Conon Cp. II. i. 29. Through the influence of Pharnabazus, Conon had been commissioned a Persian admiral. His fleet was Greek merely in the sense that it was manned by Greek mercenaries and volunteers. with the Greek fleet was posted in front of him.
6. Aeschines, Letters, 1.112, 3.143, 3.187-3.190, 3.243 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Demosthenes, Orations, 20.70, 20.75, 20.79, 20.86, 20.127-20.130, 20.146, 20.159, 21.62, 22.5, 22.8, 22.36-22.37, 22.72, 23.130, 23.136, 24.180, 50.13, 60.27-60.31 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.29, 14.83.5-14.83.7, 14.91.2, 15.33.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11.29. 1.  When Mardonius and his army had returned to Thebes, the Greeks gathered in congress decreed to make common cause with the Athenians and advancing to Plataea in a body, to fight to a finish for liberty, and also to make a vow to the gods that, if they were victorious, the Greeks would unite in celebrating the Festival of Liberty on that day and would hold the games of the Festival in Plataea.,2.  And when the Greek forces were assembled at the Isthmus, all of them agreed that they should swear an oath about the war, one that would make staunch the concord among them and would compel entrenchment nobly to endure the perils of the battle.,3.  The oath ran as follows: "I will not hold life dearer than liberty, nor will I desert the leaders, whether they be living or dead, but I will bury all the allies who have perished in the battle; and if I overcome the barbarians in the war, I will not destroy any one of the cities which have participated in the struggle; nor will I rebuild any one of the sanctuaries which have been burnt or demolished, but I will let them be and leave them as a reminder to coming generations of the impiety of the barbarians.",4.  After they had sworn the oath, they marched to Boeotia through the pass of Cithaeron, and when they had descended as far as the foothills near Erythrae, they pitched camp there. The command over the Athenians was held by Aristeides, and the supreme command by Pausanias, who was the guardian of the son of Leonidas. 14.83.5.  When they learned that the enemy's naval forces were at Cnidus, they made preparations for battle. Peisander, the Lacedaemonian admiral, set out from Cnidus with eighty-five triremes and put in at Physcus of the Chersonesus. 14.83.6.  On sailing from there he fell in with the King's fleet, and engaging the leading ships, he won the advantage over them; but when the Persians came to give aid with their triremes in close formation, all his allies fled to the land. But Peisander turned his own ship against them, believing ignoble flight to be disgraceful and unworthy of Sparta. 14.83.7.  After fighting brilliantly and slaying many of the enemy, in the end he was overcome, battling in a manner worthy of his native land. Conon pursued the Lacedaemonians as far as the land and captured fifty of their triremes. As for the crews, most of them leaped overboard and escaped by land, but about five hundred were captured. The rest of the triremes found safety at Cnidus. 14.91.2.  The exiles who held Lechaeum in Corinthian territory, being admitted into the city in the night, endeavoured to get possession of the walls, but when the troops of Iphicrates came up against them, they lost three hundred of their number and fled back to the ship station. Some days later a contingent of the Lacedaemonian army was passing through Corinthian territory, when Iphicrates and some of the allies in Corinth fell on them and slew the larger number. 15.33.4.  After this Agesilaüs returned with his army to the Peloponnese, while the Thebans, saved by the generalship of Chabrias, though he had performed many gallant deeds in war, was particularly proud of this bit of strategy and he caused the statues which had been granted to him by his people to be erected to display that posture.
10. Strabo, Geography, 9.2.31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.2.31. Plataeae, which Homer speaks of in the singular number, is at the foot of Cithaeron, between it and Thebes, along the road that leads to Athens and Megara, on the confines of Attica and Megaris; for Eleutherae is near by, which some say belongs to Attica, others to Boeotia. I have already said that the Asopus flows past Plataeae. Here it was that the forces of the Greeks completely wiped out Mardonius and his three hundred thousand Persians; and they built a sanctuary of Zeus Eleutherius, and instituted the athletic games in which the victor received a crown, calling them the Eleutheria. And tombs of those who died in the battle, erected at public expense, are still to be seen. In Sikyonia, also, there is a deme called Plataeae, the home of Mnasalces the poet: The tomb of Mnasalces the Plataean. Homer speaks of Glissas, a settlement in the mountain Hypatus, which is in the Theban country near Teumessus and Cadmeia. The hillocks below which lies the Aonian Plain, as it is called, which extends from the Hypatus mountain to Thebes, are called Dria.
11. Plutarch, Aristides, 11.5-11.6, 20.4-20.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.3.2-1.3.4, 1.24.7, 1.26.2, 1.40.2-1.40.3, 1.44.4, 9.2.5-9.2.6, 10.21.5-10.21.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.3.2. Near the portico stand Conon, Timotheus his son and Evagoras Evagoras was a king of Salamis in Cyprus, who reigned from about 410 to 374 B.C. He favoured the Athenians, and helped Conon to defeat the Spartan fleet off Cnidus in 394 B.C. King of Cyprus, who caused the Phoenician men-of-war to be given to Conon by King Artaxerxes. This he did as an Athenian whose ancestry connected him with Salamis, for he traced his pedigree back to Teucer and the daughter of Cinyras. Here stands Zeus, called Zeus of Freedom, and the Emperor Hadrian, a benefactor to all his subjects and especially to the city of the Athenians. 1.3.3. A portico is built behind with pictures of the gods called the Twelve. On the wall opposite are painted Theseus, Democracy and Demos. The picture represents Theseus as the one who gave the Athenians political equality. By other means also has the report spread among men that Theseus bestowed sovereignty upon the people, and that from his time they continued under a democratical government, until Peisistratus rose up and became despot. 560-527 B.C. But there are many false beliefs current among the mass of mankind, since they are ignorant of historical science and consider trustworthy whatever they have heard from childhood in choruses and tragedies; one of these is about Theseus, who in fact himself became king, and afterwards, when Menestheus was dead, the descendants of Theseus remained rulers even to the fourth generation. But if I cared about tracing the pedigree I should have included in the list, besides these, the kings from Melanthus to Cleidicus the son of Aesimides. 1.3.4. Here is a picture of the exploit, near Mantinea, of the Athenians who were sent to help the Lacedaemonians. 362 B.C. Xenophon among others has written a history of the whole war—the taking of the Cadmea, the defeat of the Lacedaemonians at Leuctra, how the Boeotians invaded the Peloponnesus,and the contingent sent to the Lacedacmonians from the Athenians. In the picture is a cavalry battle, in which the most famous men are, among the Athenians, Grylus the son of Xenophon, and in the Boeotian cavalry, Epaminondas the Theban. These pictures were painted for the Athenians by Euphranor, and he also wrought the Apollo surnamed Patrous (Paternal) in the temple hard by. And in front of the temple is one Apollo made by Leochares; the other Apollo, called Averter of evil, was made by Calamis. They say that the god received this name because by an oracle from Delphi he stayed the pestilence which afflicted the Athenians at the time of the Peloponnesian War. 430 B.C. 1.24.7. The statue of Athena is upright, with a tunic reaching to the feet, and on her breast the head of Medusa is worked in ivory. She holds a statue of Victory about four cubits high, and in the other hand a spear; at her feet lies a shield and near the spear is a serpent. This serpent would be Erichthonius. On the pedestal is the birth of Pandora in relief. Hesiod and others have sung how this Pandora was the first woman; before Pandora was born there was as yet no womankind. The only portrait statue I remember seeing here is one of the emperor Hadrian, and at the entrance one of Iphicrates, A famous Athenian soldier.fl. 390 B.C. who accomplished many remarkable achievements. 1.26.2. So Athens was delivered from the Macedonians, and though all the Athenians fought memorably, Leocritus the son of Protarchus is said to have displayed most daring in the engagement. For he was the first to scale the fortification, and the first to rush into the Museum; and when he fell fighting, the Athenians did him great honor, dedicating his shield to Zeus of Freedom and in scribing on it the name of Leocritus and his exploit. 1.40.2. Not far from this fountain is an ancient sanctuary, and in our day likenesses stand in it of Roman emperors, and a bronze image is there of Artemis surnamed Saviour. There is a story that a detachment of the army of Mardonius, having over run Megaris 479 B.C., wished to return to Mardonius at Thebes, but that by the will of Artemis night came on them as they marched, and missing their way they turned into the hilly region. Trying to find out whether there was a hostile force near they shot some missiles. The rock near groaned when struck, and they shot again with greater eagerness 1.40.3. until at last they used up all their arrows thinking that they were shooting at the enemy. When the day broke, the Megarians attacked, and being men in armour fighting against men without armour who no longer had even a supply of missiles, they killed the greater number of their opponents. For this reason they had an image made of Artemis Saviour. Here are also images of the gods named the Twelve, said to be the work of Praxiteles. But the image of Artemis herself was made by Strongylion. 1.44.4. The hilly part of Megaris borders upon Boeotia, and in it the Megarians have built the city Pagae and another one called Aegosthena . As you go to Pagae, on turning a little aside from the highway, you are shown a rock with arrows stuck all over it, into which the Persians once shot in the night. In Pagae a noteworthy relic is a bronze image of Artemis surnamed Saviour, in size equal to that at Megara and exactly like it in shape. There is also a hero-shrine of Aegialeus, son of Adrastus. When the Argives made their second attack on Thebes he died at Glisas early in the first battle, and his relatives carried him to Pagae in Megaris and buried him, the shrine being still called the Aegialeum. 9.2.5. Roughly at the entrance into Plataea are the graves of those who fought against the Persians. of the Greeks generally there is a common tomb, but the Lacedaemonians and Athenians who fell have separate graves, on which are written elegiac verses by Simonides. Not far from the common tomb of the Greeks is an altar of Zeus, God of Freedom. This then is of bronze, but the altar and the image he made of white marble. 9.2.6. Even at the present day they hold every four years games called Eleutheria (of Freedom), in which great prizes are offered for running. The competitors run in armour before the altar. The trophy which the Greeks set up for the battle at Plataea stands about fifteen stades from the city. 10.21.5. On this day the Attic contingent surpassed the other Greeks in courage. of the Athenians themselves the bravest was Cydias, a young man who had never before been in battle. He was killed by the Gauls, but his relatives dedicated his shield to Zeus God of Freedom, and the inscription ran:— Here hang I, yearning for the still youthful bloom of Cydias, The shield of a glorious man, an offering to Zeus. I was the very first through which at this battle he thrust his left arm, When the battle raged furiously against the Gaul . 10.21.6. This inscription remained until Sulla and his army took away, among other Athenian treasures, the shields in the porch of Zeus, God of Freedom. After this battle at Thermopylae the Greeks buried their own dead and spoiled the barbarians, but the Gauls sent no herald to ask leave to take up the bodies, and were indifferent whether the earth received them or whether they were devoured by wild beasts or carrion birds.
13. Aeschines, Or., 1.112, 3.143, 3.187-3.190, 3.243

14. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.96-1.98, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

15. Andocides, Orations, 1.45, 1.96-1.98, 2.11-2.12, 2.17-2.18

16. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40, 131

17. Epigraphy, Ig I , 40, 131

18. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 2790, 40, 70, 10

19. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 4, 22

20. Epigraphy, Agora, 15.1-15.25

21. Lycurgus, Orations, 1.127



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aglauros Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
agora xi–xiii Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
agorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
ambassadors Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
apollodorus, trierarch in Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
artemis soteira, in megara Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 37
asia minor Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
ateleia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 244
athenian Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84
athens, acropolis of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
athens, agora of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
athens, its resources in the fourth century bc Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
benefactors, foreigners as Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
cleon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
clients, cnidus, battle of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196
collective memory, manipulation of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196, 244
conon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
corinthian war Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
crowns, gold crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 244
crowns Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
deipnon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
demetrios poliorketes Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 291
demokratia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
demos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
demosthenes Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84
diocleides Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
eirene Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
eisphorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
eleutheria, soteria, originally separate from Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 37
eleutheria, soteria, relation to Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 37
epithets, related to soter/soteira Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
eponymous heroes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
erekhtheus Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
euagoras (king of salamis) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
euergetism, democratization of Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84
evagoras i, king of salamis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
gift-exchange, equivalence in Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
gifts, and dependence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
gods, as city-protectors Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
grain supply Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
harmodius and aristogiton Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196, 244
honours Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84
iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196, 244
isocrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196, 244
khaironeia, battle of xiii Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
knidos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
konon Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
kore, and demeter as προκαθήμεναι θεαί\u200e Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
kosmetes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
liturgies, exemption from Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
liturgies, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
lokhagos Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
megistai timai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196
military commanders, honors for Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
pausanias the periegete Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
peloponnesian war Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 244
persia, persians Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196
pharnabazus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
piraeus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
politeia (citizenship) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
poseidon soter, in the persian wars Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 37
price, simon, προεστώς\u200e/προεστῶσα\u200e τῆς πόλεως\u200e Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
price, simon, προκαθήμενος\u200e/προκαθήμενα\u200e τῆς πόλεως\u200e Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
proedria Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196
prytaneion Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 84; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
public praise Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
sitêsis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196
sophronistes Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
soteria (in greek antiquity), panhellenic deliverance Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
soteria (in greek antiquity), the persian wars, under the impetus of Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
sparta, spartans Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196
spartocus, king of bosphorus, sphacteria, battle of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
statues, in the agora Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196
statues, of chabrias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, of citizens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
statues, of conon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196, 244
statues, of evagoras i, king of salamis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
statues, of foreigners Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
statues, of iphicrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196, 244
statues, of military commanders Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 196, 244
statues, of timotheus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
statues, votive Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 196
stoa of zeus (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192
stoa of zeus eleutherios Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
thirty tyrants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 192, 244
timotheos (general) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
tour of sanctuaries Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
triêrarchiai, triêrarchoi' Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 244
virtues, eutaxia (discipline, good order) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
virtues, peitharkhia (obedience) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
virtues, sophrosyne (self-mastery, self-control, moderation, modesty) Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
zeus eleutherios, and political freedom Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
zeus eleutherios, at plataea Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
zeus eleutherios, in the athenian agora Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 37
zeus eleutherios Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 143
zeus soter, in dreams of the plataean general Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 52
zeus soter, in the athenian agora Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 37
zeus soter, interchangeable with Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 37