Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



12059
Isocrates, Orations, 16.35
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.54 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.54. When the divine answers had been brought back and Croesus learned of them, he was very pleased with the oracles. So, altogether expecting that he would destroy the kingdom of Cyrus, he sent once again to Pytho and endowed the Delphians, whose number he had learned, with two gold staters apiece. ,The Delphians, in return, gave Croesus and all Lydians the right of first consulting the oracle, exemption from all charges, the chief seats at festivals, and perpetual right of Delphian citizenship to whoever should wish it.
2. Isocrates, Orations, 16.32, 18.61 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Lysias, Orations, 21.11-21.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

472a. for getting at the truth; since occasionally a man may actually be crushed by the number and reputation of the false witnesses brought against him. And so now you will find almost everybody, Athenians and foreigners, in agreement with you on the points you state, if you like to bring forward witnesses against the truth of what I say: if you like, there is Nicias, son of Niceratus, with his brothers, whose tripods are standing in a row in the Dionysium; or else Aristocrates, son of Scellias, whose goodly offering again is well known at Delphi ;
5. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.12.2, 6.16.1-6.16.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.12.2. And if there be any man here, overjoyed at being chosen to command, who urges you to make the expedition, merely for ends of his own—especially if he be still too young to command—who seeks to be admired for his stud of horses, but on account of its heavy expenses hopes for some profit from his appointment, do not allow such an one to maintain his private splendour at his country's risk, but remember that such persons injure the public fortune while they squander their own, and that this is a matter of importance, and not for a young man to decide or hastily to take in hand. 6.16.1. ‘Athenians, I have a better right to command than others—I must begin with this as Nicias has attacked me—and at the same time I believe myself to be worthy of it. The things for which I am abused, bring fame to my ancestors and to myself, and to the country profit besides. 6.16.2. The Hellenes, after expecting to see our city ruined by the war, concluded it to be even greater than it really is, by reason of the magnificence with which I represented it at the Olympic games, when I sent into the lists seven chariots, a number never before entered by any private person, and won the first prize, and was second and fourth, and took care to have everything else in a style worthy of my victory. Custom regards such displays as honourable, and they cannot be made without leaving behind them an impression of power. 6.16.3. Again, any splendour that I may have exhibited at home in providing choruses or otherwise, is naturally envied by my fellow-citizens, but in the eyes of foreigners has an air of strength as in the other instance. And this is no useless folly, when a man at his own private cost benefits not himself only, but his city:
6. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 27.3-27.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.154-21.157, 22.37, 23.1, 23.201, 59.117 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, 139 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 16.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.3. And indeed, his voluntary contributions of money, his support of public exhibitions, his unsurpassed munificence towards the city, the glory of his ancestry, the power of his eloquence, the comeliness and vigor of his person, together with his experience and prowess in war, made the Athenians lenient and tolerant towards everything else; they were forever giving the mildest of names to his transgressions, calling them the product of youthful spirits and ambition.
10. Plutarch, Cimon, 10.3-10.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Plutarch, Nicias, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Pericles, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Solon, 23.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23.3. In the valuations of sacrificial offerings, at any rate, a sheep and a bushel of grain are reckoned at a drachma; the victor in the Isthmian games was to be paid a hundred drachmas, and the Olympic victor five hundred; the man who brought in a wolf, was given five drachmas, and for a wolf’s whelp, one; the former sum, according to Demetrius the Phalerian, was the price of an ox, the latter that of a sheep. For although the prices which Solon fixes in his sixteenth table are for choice victims, and naturally many times as great as those for ordinary ones, still, even these are low in comparison with present prices.
14. Epigraphy, Ig I , 49

15. Epigraphy, Ig I , 49

16. Epigraphy, Syll. , 4

17. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 882



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcibiades Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 153
athletes, honored in archaic poleis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
athletic victories, as benefactions Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153
benefactors, citizens as Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
cimon Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
dating Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 120
demos, and gifts in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
demosthenes, life of, political rise Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 120
ethos, euthycles Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 120
euergetês, euergetai, in the archaic polis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gift-exchange, non-institutional/informal Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gifts, and dependence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gifts, and power Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
gymnasiarchiai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153
isocrates Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153
liturgies, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 153
liturgy' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 120
military commanders, honors for Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
nicias Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 153
olympia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153
olympic games Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153
peloponnesian war Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55, 153
pericles Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
plutarch Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
public buildings, and pericles building program Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
rich, the, in fourth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
sicily Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153
springhouse decree (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 55
thucydides, historian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153
triêrarchiai, triêrarchoi Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 153