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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6803
Isaeus, Orations, 8.16
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.446-1.474 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.446. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.447. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.448. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.449. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.450. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.451. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.452. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.453. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.454. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.455. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.456. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.457. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.458. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.459. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Then, when they had prayed, and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads, and cut their throats, and flayed them, and cut out the thighs and covered them 1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.464. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.465. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.466. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.467. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.468. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.469. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.470. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.471. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.472. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.473. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.474. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.420, 3.436-3.463, 14.414-14.445, 19.109-19.114 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 916 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

916. δέξομαι Παλλάδος ξυνοικίαν 916. I will accept a home with Pallas, and I will not dishonor a city which she, with Zeus the omnipotent and Ares, holds as a fortress of the gods
4. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 626-627, 625 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

625. ἄγε δή, λέξωμεν ἐπʼ Ἀργείοις 625. Come, let us invoke blessings upon the Argives in return for blessings. And may Zeus, god of strangers, behold the offerings of gratitude voiced by a stranger’s lips, that they may in true fulfilment reach their perfect goal. Chorus
5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 1049 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1049. ἔπεμψέ τίς σοι νυμφίος ταυτὶ κρέα
6. Aristophanes, Birds, 1516-1524, 848-903, 958-991, 1515 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1515. ἐξ οὗπερ ὑμεῖς ᾠκίσατε τὸν ἀέρα.
7. Aristophanes, Peace, 1009, 1013-1014, 1017-1021, 1026-1032, 1039-1040, 1043-1047, 1053-1056, 1059, 1065, 1070-1071, 1084, 1095-1098, 1117-1126, 960, 962-963, 973-987, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1005. καὶ Κωπᾴδων ἐλθεῖν σπυρίδας
8. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 294-302, 329-330, 541, 293 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

293. ἵν' ἐξακούω; σὺ δ' ἄπιθ' ὦ Θρᾷττ' ἐκποδών.
9. Euripides, Electra, 782-843, 781 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

781. ὁ δ' εἶπ' ̓Ορέστης: Θεσσαλοί: πρὸς δ' ̓Αλφεὸν
10. Euripides, Helen, 1560-1589, 1559 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1559. μὴ θιγγάνειν ἀπεῖργεν. ὁ δ' ̔Ελένης πόσις
11. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 923-941, 922 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

922. Victims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.
12. Herodotus, Histories, 6.87 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.87. Thus spoke Leutychides; but even so the Athenians would not listen to him, and he departed. The Aeginetans, before paying the penalty for the violence they had done to the Athenians to please the Thebans, acted as follows: blaming the Athenians and deeming themselves wronged, they prepared to take vengeance on the Athenians, who were now celebrating a quinquennial festival at Sunium. The Aeginetans set an ambush and captured the sacred ship, with many leading Athenians on board, and put in prison the men they seized.
13. Isaeus, Orations, 1.31, 3.80, 6.49-6.50, 8.15, 8.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Lysias, Orations, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

15. Lysias, Against Andocides, 450 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. Sophocles, Antigone, 1006-1011, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.32.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.32.2. In their prayers joined also the crowds on shore, the citizens and all others that wished them well. The hymn sung and the libations finished, they put out to sea, and first sailing out in column then raced each other as far as Aegina, and so hastened to reach Corcyra where the rest of the allied forces were also assembling.
18. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 7.8.1-7.8.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.8.1. It was likewise resolved that the generals should undergo an inquiry with reference to their past conduct. When they presented their statements, Philesius and Xanthicles were condemned, for their careless guarding of the merchantmen’s cargoes, cp. Xen. Anab. 5.1.16 . to pay the loss incurred, namely, twenty minas, and Sophaenetus, for neglect of duty in the office to which he had been chosen, cp. Xen. Anab. 5.3.1, and see critical note. was fined ten minas. Accusations were also made against Xenophon by certain men who claimed that he had beaten them, and so brought the charge of wanton assault. 7.8.1. From there they sailed across to Lampsacus, where Xenophon was met by Eucleides, the Phliasian seer, son of the Cleagoras who painted the mural paintings in the Lyceum. The famous gymnasium at Athens . Eucleides congratulated Xenophon upon his safe return, and asked him how much gold he had got. 7.8.2. Xenophon bade the first man who spoke to state where it was that he had struck him. He replied, In the place where we were perishing with cold and there was an enormous amount of snow. 7.8.2. He replied, swearing to the truth of his statement, that he would not have even enough money to pay his travelling expenses on the way home unless he should sell his horse and what he had about his person. And Eucleides would not believe him. 7.8.3. And Xenophon said, Well, really, with weather of the sort you describe and provisions used up and no chance even to get a smell of wine, when many of us were becoming exhausted with hardships and the enemy were at our heels, if at such a time as that I wantonly abused you, I admit that I am more wanton even than the ass, which, because of its wantonness, so the saying runs, is not subject to fatigue. Nevertheless, do tell us, he said, for what reason you were struck. 7.8.3. But when the Lampsacenes sent gifts of hospitality to Xenophon and he was sacrificing to Apollo, he gave Eucleides a place beside him; and when Eucleides saw the vitals of the victims, he said that he well believed that Xenophon had no money. But I am sure, he went on, that even if money should ever be about to come to you, some obstacle always appears—if nothing else, your own self. In this Xenophon agreed with him. 7.8.4. Did I ask you for something, and then strike you because you would not give it to me? Did I demand something back? Was it in a fight over a favourite? Was it an act of drunken violence? 7.8.4. Then Eucleides said, Yes, Zeus the Merciful is an obstacle in your way, and asked whether he had yet sacrificed to him, just as at home, he continued, where I was wont to offer the sacrifices for you, and with whole victims. Xenophon replied that not since he left home had he sacrificed to that god. i.e. Zeus in this particular one of his functions, as the Merciful. cp. Xen. Anab. 7.6.44 . Eucleides, accordingly, advised him to sacrifice just as he used to do, and said that it would be to his advantage. 7.8.5. When the man replied that it was none of these things, Xenophon asked him if he was a hoplite. He said no. Was he a peltast, then? No, not that either, he said, but he had been detailed by his messmates, although he was a free man, to drive a mule. 7.8.5. And the next day, upon coming to Ophrynium, Xenophon proceeded to sacrifice, offering whole victims of swine after the custom of his fathers, and he obtained favourable omens. 7.8.6. At that Xenophon recognized him, and asked: Are you the fellow who carried the sick man? Yes, by Zeus, he replied, for you forced me to do so; and you scattered my messmates’ baggage all about. 7.8.6. In fact, on that very day Bion and Nausicleides Apparently officers sent by Thibron. arrived with money to give to the army and were entertained by Xenophon, and they redeemed his horse, which he had sold at Lampsacus for fifty daries,—for they suspected that he had sold it for want of money, since they heard he was fond of the horse,—gave it back to him, and would not accept from him the price of it.
19. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.3.11 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.3.11. If you have observed that I know some spell without being conscious of my knowledge, pray tell me at once. Then tell me, now; if you wanted to get an invitation to dine with an acquaintance when he offers sacrifice, what would you do? of course I should begin by inviting him myself when I offered sacrifice.
20. Xenophon, On Household Management, 2.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.5. How can that be? exclaimed Critobulus. Because, in the first place, explained Socrates , I notice that you are bound to offer many large sacrifices; else, I fancy, you would get into trouble with gods and men alike. Secondly, it is your duty to entertain many strangers, on a generous scale too. Thirdly, you have to give dinners and play the benefactor to the citizens, or you lose your following.
21. Demosthenes, Prooemia, 54 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22. Demosthenes, Prooemia, 54 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

23. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.128, 19.190, 57.8-57.9, 59.73-59.86 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24. Plutarch, Nicias, 7.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Andocides, Orations, 1.82, 1.84

26. Andocides, Orations, 1.82, 1.84

27. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 2496-2498, 2492

28. Epigraphy, Seg, 24.151-24.153, 33.115, 51.153

29. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 337



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adoption, by will Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
agathe tyche (deity), cultural pair with agathos daimon Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
agathos daimon (deity), cultural pair with agathe tyche Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
agathos daimon (deity), snakes and Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
agathos daimon (deity), zeus and Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
agonothetai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
aischines, date of birth, and family Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 389
ambiguity Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 55
apollo Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
archons, eponymous Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
aristophanes peace, theoria in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 44
athens Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 574
bribe Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 810
childhood, children Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 389
cornutus, theol graec Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
crown, multiple Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 389, 1051
deme, assembly Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 810
demetrios poliorketes, honours Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 389
diokles of phlya Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
dionysia, rural Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 810
dionysus (god and cult) Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 269
epikleros, disputes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
eumaeus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
eusebeia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6, 19
eusebius Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
festivals Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 268, 269
foreigners Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 268
friends relation to kin Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 43
friends together Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 43, 44
gods (egyptian, greek, and roman), zeus Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 55
half-siblings, uterine, cross-sex Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
hekatostai records Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 1051
heortai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6
hermes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
hipparchs Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
hybris Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
hygieia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6
isaeus Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 55; Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
jupiter Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
kin relation to friends Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 43
koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
law courts Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
lot of fortune, place of acquisition and Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
maia Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
nymphs Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
oaths, sacred Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 268
odysseus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
oracles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
orestes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
orphic hymns Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
parasite, of athena pallenis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 1051
penteterides at sunium Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 44
pilgrimage Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 389
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 55
places, astrological, derived places Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
places, astrological, functions of Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
places, astrological, jupiter and Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
places, astrological, place of acquisition Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
porphyry Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
prayer Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 574; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
prayers Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6
priest Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166
priests and priestesses, of asclepius, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses, of thesmophoroi at melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6, 19
proof Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 55
prytaneis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
quarry Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 810
rent Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 810
rites Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 268, 269
sacrifice, beauty of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6, 19
sacrifice Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 166; Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6, 19
sacrifice creates bond Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 43
sacrifices, public Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 268, 269
shared with whom? Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 43, 44
shechemites Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 574
sophronistes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 1051
soteria Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 6
step-kin Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
tefillah, original version Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 574
tefillah, petitions Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 574
tefillah, yhwh elohenu benedictions Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 574
themis Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
theophrastus, characters, religion in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 43
theoria to brauron as character in ar. pax Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 44
theoria to festivals' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 44
theseion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 810
thesmophoroi of melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
thesmothetes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 1051
theôria Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 389
violence Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
weakness Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 207
writing, demes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 810
zeus, ctesius Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 268
zeus/jupiter Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
zeus ktesios, 11th place and Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
zeus ktesios Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
zeus meilichios, wealth and Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
zeus meilichios Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52
zeus philios Gieseler Greenbaum, The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence (2015) 52