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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6793
Irenaeus, Refutation Of All Heresies, 9.12


nanInasmuch as (Elchasai) considers, then, that it would be an insult to reason that these mighty and ineffable mysteries should be trampled under foot, or that they should be committed to many, he advises that as valuable pearls Matthew 7:6 they should be preserved, expressing himself thus: Do not recite this account to all men, and guard carefully these precepts, because all men are not faithful, nor are all women straightforward. Books containing these (tenets), however, neither the wise men of the Egyptians secreted in shrines, nor did Pythagoras, a sage of the Greeks, conceal them there. For if at that time Elchasai had happened to live, what necessity would there be that Pythagoras, or Thales, or Solon, or the wise Plato, or even the rest of the sages of the Greeks, should become disciples of the Egyptian priests, when they could obtain possession of such and such wisdom from Alcibiades, as the most astonishing interpreter of that wretched Elchasai? The statements, therefore, that have been made for the purpose of attaining a knowledge of the madness of these, would seem sufficient for those endued with sound mind. And so it is, that it has not appeared expedient to quote more of their formularies, seeing that these are very numerous and ridiculous. Since, however, we have not omitted those practices that have risen up in our own day, and have not been silent as regards those prevalent before our time, it seems proper, in order that we may pass through all their systems, and leave nothing untold, to state what also are the (customs) of the Jews, and what are the diversities of opinion among them, for I imagine that these as yet remain behind for our consideration. Now, when I have broken silence on these points, I shall pass on to the demonstration of the Doctrine of the Truth, in order that, after the lengthened argumentative straggle against all heresies, we, devoutly pressing forward towards the kingdom's crown, and believing the truth, may not be unsettled.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Strabo, Geography, 6.1.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.1.4. The seaboard that comes next after Leucania, as far as the Sicilian Strait and for a distance of thirteen hundred and fifty stadia, is occupied by the Brettii. According to Antiochus, in his treatise On Italy, this territory (and this is the territory which he says he is describing) was once called Italy, although in earlier times it was called Oinotria. And he designates as its boundaries, first, on the Tyrrhenian sea, the same boundary that I have assigned to the country of the Brettii — the River Laus; and secondly, on the Sicilian Sea, Metapontium. But as for the country of the Tarantini, which borders on Metapontium, he names it as outside of Italy, and calls its inhabitants Iapyges. And at a time more remote, according to him, the names Italians and Oinotrians were applied only to the people who lived this side the isthmus in the country that slopes toward the Sicilian Strait. The isthmus itself, one hundred and sixty stadia in width, lies between two gulfs — the Hipponiate (which Antiochus has called Napetine) and the Scylletic. The coasting-voyage round the country comprised between the isthmus and the Strait is two thousand stadia. But after that, he says, the name of Italy and that of the Oinotrians was further extended as far as the territory of Metapontium and that of Seiris, for, he adds, the Chones, a well-regulated Oinotrian tribe, had taken up their abode in these regions and had called the land Chone. Now Antiochus had spoken only in a rather simple and antiquated way, without making any distinctions between the Leucani and the Brettii. In the first place, Leucania lies between the Tyrrhenian and Sicilian coastlines, the former coastline from the River Silaris as far as Laus, and the latter, from Metapontium as far as Thurii; in the second place, on the mainland, from the country of the Samnitae as far as the isthmus which extends from Thurii to Cerilli (a city near Laus), the isthmus is three hundred stadia in width. But the Brettii are situated beyond the Leucani; they live on a peninsula, but this peninsula includes another peninsula which has the isthmus that extends from Scylletium to the Hipponiate Gulf. The name of the tribe was given to it by the Leucani, for the Leucani call all revolters brettii. The Brettii revolted, so it is said (at first they merely tended flocks for the Leucani, and then, by reason of the indulgence of their masters, began to act as free men), at the time when Rio made his expedition against Dionysius and aroused all peoples against all others. So much, then, for my general description of the Leucani and the Brettii.
2. Martial, Epigrams, 2.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Martial, Epigrams, 2.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. New Testament, Acts, 16.20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.20. When they had brought them to the magistrates, they said, "These men, being Jews, are agitating our city
5. Suetonius, Iulius, 25 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 72.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Hermas, Visions, 4.1.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 9.11-9.12 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9.11. But in very many other respects he talks folly, inculcating the use of these sentences also for those afflicted with consumption, and that they should be dipped in cold water forty times during seven days; and he prescribes similar treatment for those possessed of devils. Oh inimitable wisdom and incantations gorged with powers! Who will not be astonished at such and such force of words? But since we have stated that they also bring into requisition astrological deceit, we shall prove this from their own formularies; for Elchasai speaks thus: There exist wicked stars of impiety. This declaration has been now made by us, O you pious ones and disciples: beware of the power of the days of the sovereignty of these stars, and engage not in the commencement of any undertaking during the ruling days of these. And baptize not man or woman during the days of the power of these stars, when the moon, (emerging) from among them, courses the sky, and travels along with them. Beware of the very day up to that on which the moon passes out from these stars, and then baptize and enter on every beginning of your works. But, moreover, honour the day of the Sabbath, since that day is one of those during which prevails (the power) of these stars. Take care, however, not to commence your works the third day from a Sabbath, since when three years of the reign of the emperor Trojan are again completed from the time that he subjected the Parthians to his own sway - when, I say, three years have been completed, war rages between the impious angels of the northern constellations; and on this account all kingdoms of impiety are in a state of confusion. 9.12. Inasmuch as (Elchasai) considers, then, that it would be an insult to reason that these mighty and ineffable mysteries should be trampled under foot, or that they should be committed to many, he advises that as valuable pearls Matthew 7:6 they should be preserved, expressing himself thus: Do not recite this account to all men, and guard carefully these precepts, because all men are not faithful, nor are all women straightforward. Books containing these (tenets), however, neither the wise men of the Egyptians secreted in shrines, nor did Pythagoras, a sage of the Greeks, conceal them there. For if at that time Elchasai had happened to live, what necessity would there be that Pythagoras, or Thales, or Solon, or the wise Plato, or even the rest of the sages of the Greeks, should become disciples of the Egyptian priests, when they could obtain possession of such and such wisdom from Alcibiades, as the most astonishing interpreter of that wretched Elchasai? The statements, therefore, that have been made for the purpose of attaining a knowledge of the madness of these, would seem sufficient for those endued with sound mind. And so it is, that it has not appeared expedient to quote more of their formularies, seeing that these are very numerous and ridiculous. Since, however, we have not omitted those practices that have risen up in our own day, and have not been silent as regards those prevalent before our time, it seems proper, in order that we may pass through all their systems, and leave nothing untold, to state what also are the (customs) of the Jews, and what are the diversities of opinion among them, for I imagine that these as yet remain behind for our consideration. Now, when I have broken silence on these points, I shall pass on to the demonstration of the Doctrine of the Truth, in order that, after the lengthened argumentative straggle against all heresies, we, devoutly pressing forward towards the kingdom's crown, and believing the truth, may not be unsettled.
9. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Tertullian, To Scapula, 4-5, 3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3. However, as we have already remarked, it cannot but distress us that no state shall bear unpunished the guilt of shedding Christian blood; as you see, indeed, in what took place during the presidency of Hilarian, for when there had been some agitation about places of sepulture for our dead, and the cry arose, No are - no burial-grounds for the Christians, it came that their own are, their threshing-floors, were a-wanting, for they gathered in no harvests. As to the rains of the bygone year, it is abundantly plain of what they were intended to remind men - of the deluge, no doubt, which in ancient times overtook human unbelief and wickedness; and as to the fires which lately hung all night over the walls of Carthage, they who saw them know what they threatened; and what the preceding thunders pealed, they who were hardened by them can tell. All these things are signs of God's impending wrath, which we must needs publish and proclaim in every possible way; and in the meanwhile we must pray it may be only local. Sure are they to experience it one day in its universal and final form, who interpret otherwise these samples of it. That sun, too, in the metropolis of Utica, with light all but extinguished, was a portent which could not have occurred from an ordinary eclipse, situated as the lord of day was in his height and house. You have the astrologers, consult them about it. We can point you also to the deaths of some provincial rulers, who in their last hours had painful memories of their sin in persecuting the followers of Christ. Vigellius Saturninus, who first here used the sword against us, lost his eyesight. Claudius Lucius Herminianus in Cappadocia, enraged that his wife had become a Christian, had treated the Christians with great cruelty: well, left alone in his palace, suffering under a contagious malady, he boiled out in living worms, and was heard exclaiming, Let nobody know of it, lest the Christians rejoice, and Christian wives take encouragement. Afterwards he came to see his error in having tempted so many from their steadfastness by the tortures he inflicted, and died almost a Christian himself. In that doom which overtook Byzantium, C cilius Capella could not help crying out, Christians, rejoice! Yes, and the persecutors who seem to themselves to have acted with impunity shall not escape the day of judgment. For you we sincerely wish it may prove to have been a warning only, that, immediately after you had condemned Mavilus of Adrumetum to the wild beasts, you were overtaken by those troubles, and that even now for the same reason you are called to a blood-reckoning. But do not forget the future.
12. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 3.18.4, 4.9, 4.23-4.25, 5.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

3.18.4. To such a degree, indeed, did the teaching of our faith flourish at that time that even those writers who were far from our religion did not hesitate to mention in their histories the persecution and the martyrdoms which took place during it.
13. Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine, 4.6.2 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

14. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 18.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

15. Justinian, Digest, 1.9.11, 23.2.23 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

16. Epigraphy, Cil, 6.1884

17. Pseudo-Tertullian, To His Wife, 2.8



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abortion Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
abramos Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
acilius glabrio (possibly christian) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
administration Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
adulis Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
aelius saturninus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
africa, africans Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
agency Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
almone (river) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
armies Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
asia minor Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 201
autonomy Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
aventine Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42, 335
banishment Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
banks, bankers Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42, 335
baptism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
birth control Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
bishops Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
brettians Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
bruttius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
burial places (memorials) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
business agents Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
callistus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 42, 119, 335; Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
cassia faretria Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
cassius dio Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
catacombs/cemeteries, callistus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
catacombs/cemeteries Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
change Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
christian) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
christian confession, hiding of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
christian quarters of rome Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 42
christianity Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
christians, numbers of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
citizenship, political rights Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
claudius, edict of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
claudius ephebus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
clement (author of 1 clement) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 201
commodus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42, 89, 119
community property Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
concubinage Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
consul Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
corinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
cubiculum Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
deacon Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
deposits Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
dionysius of corinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
domitian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
domitilla, flavia, cf. Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119, 201
elder (presbyter) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
ethiopia Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
ethnogenesis Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
familia caesaris Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
fish Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
flavians Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
flight Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
freedpersons (and their descendants), manumission Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 335
fuscianus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
godlessness, reproach of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
hadrian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
hermas Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
himyar Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
hippolytus (soon after Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 42, 119
humiliores Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 119
hyacinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
ignatius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
imperial court Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 335
imperial cult Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
imperial freedpersons Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 335
imperial slaves Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 335
italy Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
itineraries Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
jews, jewish Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42, 201, 335
karpophorus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
laborers, manual Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
late antiquity Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
lesser aventine Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
limigantes Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
lucanians Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
manumission Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
marcia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 201
marcus aurelius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
marriage Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
memorial, grave Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
mixed marriages Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
nero Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 201
networking, "connections, " Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
penal enslavement Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
perennis Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
persecution, martyrs Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 201, 335
pietas Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
piscina publica Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
pomponia graecina Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
porta capena Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
possessions, wealth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 119, 335
quarters, of city Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 42
real estate, private Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 42, 119
revolts Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
roads, radial Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
sarcophagus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
sardinia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 335
sarmatians Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
sebomenoi Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201
senator, senatorial Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119, 201
septimius severus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
shepherds Vlassopoulos, Historicising Ancient Slavery (2021) 195
sixtus iii Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26
slaves, slavery Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42, 89, 119, 335
social decline Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
socially elevated Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 119
stratification, social Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89, 119
tertullian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
topography Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 42
trade, occupation Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
trials Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 201, 335
via appia Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26, 42
via portuensis Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 42
vicarius (slave) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 335
victor Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 89
wife of governor i Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
wife of governor ii Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
women Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 119
zephyrinus' Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 26