Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6793
Irenaeus, Refutation Of All Heresies, 4.38.3


nanWith God there are simultaneously exhibited power, wisdom, and goodness. His power and goodness [appear] in this, that of His own will He called into being and fashioned things having no previous existence; His wisdom [is shown] in His having made created things parts of one harmonious and consistent whole; and those things which, through His super-eminent kindness, receive growth and a long period of existence, do reflect the glory of the uncreated One, of that God who bestows what is good ungrudgingly. For from the very fact of these things having been created, [it follows] that they are not uncreated; but by their continuing in being throughout a long course of ages, they shall receive a faculty of the Uncreated, through the gratuitous bestowal of eternal existence upon them by God. And thus in all things God has the pre-eminence, who alone is uncreated, the first of all things, and the primary cause of the existence of all, while all other things remain under God's subjection. But being in subjection to God is continuance in immortality, and immortality is the glory of the uncreated One. By this arrangement, therefore, and these harmonies, and a sequence of this nature, man, a created and organized being, is rendered after the image and likeness of the uncreated God, -the Father planning everything well and giving His commands, the Son carrying these into execution and performing the work of creating, and the Spirit nourishing and increasing [what is made], but man making progress day by day, and ascending towards the perfect, that is, approximating to the uncreated One. For the Uncreated is perfect, that is, God. Now it was necessary that man should in the first instance be created; and having been created, should receive growth; and having received growth, should be strengthened; and having been strengthened, should abound; and having abounded, should recover [from the disease of sin]; and having recovered, should be glorified; and being glorified, should see his Lord. For God is He who is yet to be seen, and the beholding of God is productive of immortality, but immortality renders one nigh unto God.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

30 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.1, 1.26, 1.28 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.1. וַיִּקְרָא אֱלֹהִים לַיַּבָּשָׁה אֶרֶץ וּלְמִקְוֵה הַמַּיִם קָרָא יַמִּים וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים כִּי־טוֹב׃ 1.1. בְּרֵאשִׁית בָּרָא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַיִם וְאֵת הָאָרֶץ׃ 1.26. וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 1.28. וַיְבָרֶךְ אֹתָם אֱלֹהִים וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם אֱלֹהִים פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וְכִבְשֻׁהָ וּרְדוּ בִּדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבְכָל־חַיָּה הָרֹמֶשֶׂת עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 1.1. In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth." 1.26. And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’" 1.28. And God blessed them; and God said unto them: ‘Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that creepeth upon the earth.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 21.4, 33.9, 148.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

21.4. כִּי־תְקַדְּמֶנּוּ בִּרְכוֹת טוֹב תָּשִׁית לְרֹאשׁוֹ עֲטֶרֶת פָּז׃ 33.9. כִּי הוּא אָמַר וַיֶּהִי הוּא־צִוָּה וַיַּעֲמֹד׃ 148.5. יְהַלְלוּ אֶת־שֵׁם יְהוָה כִּי הוּא צִוָּה וְנִבְרָאוּ׃ 21.4. For Thou meetest him with choicest blessings; Thou settest a crown of fine gold on his head." 33.9. For He spoke, and it was; He commanded, and it stood." 148.5. Let them praise the name of the LORD; For He commanded, and they were created."
3. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 7.10-7.16, 57.16, 63.9 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.11. שְׁאַל־לְךָ אוֹת מֵעִם יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ הַעְמֵק שְׁאָלָה אוֹ הַגְבֵּהַּ לְמָעְלָה׃ 7.12. וַיֹּאמֶר אָחָז לֹא־אֶשְׁאַל וְלֹא־אֲנַסֶּה אֶת־יְהוָה׃ 7.13. וַיֹּאמֶר שִׁמְעוּ־נָא בֵּית דָּוִד הַמְעַט מִכֶּם הַלְאוֹת אֲנָשִׁים כִּי תַלְאוּ גַּם אֶת־אֱלֹהָי׃ 7.14. לָכֵן יִתֵּן אֲדֹנָי הוּא לָכֶם אוֹת הִנֵּה הָעַלְמָה הָרָה וְיֹלֶדֶת בֵּן וְקָרָאת שְׁמוֹ עִמָּנוּ אֵל׃ 7.15. חֶמְאָה וּדְבַשׁ יֹאכֵל לְדַעְתּוֹ מָאוֹס בָּרָע וּבָחוֹר בַּטּוֹב׃ 7.16. כִּי בְּטֶרֶם יֵדַע הַנַּעַר מָאֹס בָּרָע וּבָחֹר בַּטּוֹב תֵּעָזֵב הָאֲדָמָה אֲשֶׁר אַתָּה קָץ מִפְּנֵי שְׁנֵי מְלָכֶיהָ׃ 57.16. כִּי לֹא לְעוֹלָם אָרִיב וְלֹא לָנֶצַח אֶקְּצוֹף כִּי־רוּחַ מִלְּפָנַי יַעֲטוֹף וּנְשָׁמוֹת אֲנִי עָשִׂיתִי׃ 63.9. בְּכָל־צָרָתָם לא [לוֹ] צָר וּמַלְאַךְ פָּנָיו הוֹשִׁיעָם בְּאַהֲבָתוֹ וּבְחֶמְלָתוֹ הוּא גְאָלָם וַיְנַטְּלֵם וַיְנַשְּׂאֵם כָּל־יְמֵי עוֹלָם׃ 7.10. And the LORD spoke again unto Ahaz, saying:" 7.11. ’Ask thee a sign of the LORD thy God: ask it either in the depth, or in the height above.’" 7.12. But Ahaz said: ‘I will not ask, neither will I try the LORD.’" 7.13. And he said: ‘Hear ye now, O house of David: Is it a small thing for you to weary men, that ye will weary my God also?" 7.14. Therefore the Lord Himself shall give you a sign: behold, the young woman shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel." 7.15. Curd and honey shall he eat, when he knoweth to refuse the evil, and choose the good." 7.16. Yea, before the child shall know to refuse the evil, and choose the good, the land whose two kings thou hast a horror of shall be forsaken." 57.16. For I will not contend for ever, Neither will I be always wroth; For the spirit that enwrappeth itself is from Me, And the souls which I have made." 63.9. In all their affliction He was afflicted, and the angel of His presence saved them; in His love and in His pity He redeemed them; And He bore them, and carried them all the days of old. ."
4. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

29d. and you who judge are but human creatures, so that it becomes us to accept the likely account of these matters and forbear to search beyond it. Soc. Excellent, Timaeus! We must by all means accept it, as you suggest; and certainly we have most cordially accepted your prelude; so now, we beg of you, proceed straight on with the main theme. Tim. Let us now state the Cause wherefore He that constructed it
5. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 17.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

17.3. He endowed them with strength like his own,and made them in his own image.
6. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 6.19, 17.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.19. and immortality brings one near to God; 17.3. For thinking that in their secret sins they were unobserved behind a dark curtain of forgetfulness,they were scattered, terribly alarmed,and appalled by specters.
7. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.96 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Clement of Rome, 1 Clement, 20.1-20.3, 20.10-20.11, 21.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20.1. Οἱ οὐρανοὶ τῇ διοικήσει αὐτοῦ σαλευόμενοι ἐν εἰρήνῃ ὑποτάσσονται αὐτῷ. 20.2. ἡμέρα τε καὶ νὺξ τὸν τεταγμένον ὑπ̓ αὐτοῦ δρόμον διανύουσιν, μηδὲν ἀλλήλοις ἐμποδίζοντα. 20.3. ἥλιός τε καὶ σελήνη, ἀστέρων τε χοροὶ κατὰ τὴν διαταγὴν αὐτοῦ ἐν ὁμονοίᾳ δίχα πάσης παρεκβάσεως ἐξελίσσουσιν τοὺς ἐπιτεταγμένους αὐτοῖς ὁρισμούς. 20.10. ἀνέμων σταθμοὶ κατὰ τὸν ἴδιον καιρὸν τὴν λειτουργίαν αὐτῶν ἀπροσκόπως ἐπιτελοῦσιν: ἀέναοί τε πηγαί, πρὸς ἀπόλαυσιν καὶ ὑγείαν δημιουργηθεῖσαι, δίχα ἐλλείψεως παρέχονται τοὺς πρὸς ζωῆς ἀνθρώποις μαζούς: τά τε ἐλάχιστα τῶν ζώων τὰς συνελεύσεις αὐτῶν ἐν ὁμονοίᾳ καὶ εἰρήνῃ ποιοῦνται. 20.11. ταῦτα πάντα ὁ μέγας δημιουργὸς καὶ δεσπότης τῶν ἁπάντων ἐν εἰρήνῃ καὶ ὁμονοίᾳ προσέταξεν εἶναι, εὐεργετῶν τὰ πάντα, ὑπερεκπερισσῶς δὲ ἡμᾶς τοὺς προσπεφευγότας τοῖς οἰκτιρμοῖς αὐτοῦ διὰ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ 21.1. Ὁρᾶτε, ἀγαπητοί, μὴ αἱ εὐεργεσίαι αὐτοῦ αἱ πολλαὶ γένωνται εἰς κρίμα A(C) read kri/ma pa=sin h(mi=n. ἡμῖν, ἐὰν μὴ ἀξίως αὐτοῦ πολιτευόμενοι τὰ καλὰ καὶ εὐάρεστα ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ ποιῶμεν μεθ̓ ὁμονοίας. 20. The heavens, revolving under His government, are subject to Him in peace. Day and night run the course appointed by Him, in no wise hindering each other. The sun and moon, with the companies of the stars, roll on in harmony according to His command, within their prescribed limits, and without any deviation. The fruitful earth, according to His will, brings forth food in abundance, at the proper seasons, for man and beast and all the living beings upon it, never hesitating, nor changing any of the ordices which He has fixed. The unsearchable places of abysses, and the indescribable arrangements of the lower world, are restrained by the same laws. The vast unmeasurable sea, gathered together by His working into various basins, never passes beyond the bounds placed around it, but does as He has commanded. For He said, Thus far shall you come, and your waves shall be broken within you. Job 38:11 The ocean, impassable to man and the worlds beyond it, are regulated by the same enactments of the Lord. The seasons of spring, summer, autumn, and winter, peacefully give place to one another. The winds in their several quarters fulfil, at the proper time, their service without hindrance. The ever-flowing fountains, formed both for enjoyment and health, furnish without fail their breasts for the life of men. The very smallest of living beings meet together in peace and concord. All these the great Creator and Lord of all has appointed to exist in peace and harmony; while He does good to all, but most abundantly to us who have fled for refuge to His compassions through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom be glory and majesty for ever and ever. Amen.
9. Clement of Rome, 2 Clement, 14.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.2. οὐκ οἴομαι δὲ ὑμᾶς ἀγνοεῖν, ὅτι Eph. 1, 23. ἐκκλησία ζῶσα σῶμά ἐστιν Χριστοῦ: λέγει γὰρ ἡ Gen 1, 27 γραφή: Ἐποίησεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν ἅνθρωπον ἅρσεν καὶ θῆλυ: τὸ ἄρσεν ἐστὶν ὁ Χριστός, τὸ θῆλυ ἡ ἐκκλησία: καὶ ἔτι e)/ti C, "and moreover" (e)/ti) S. τὰ βιβλία καὶ οἱ ἀπόστολοι τὴν ἐκκλησίαν οὐ νῦν εἶναι λέγουσιν le/gousi om. C. Some such sord is necessary to the grammar of the sentence, and is implied by S, but shether it sas le/gousi or fasi/, and its exact place in the sentence is of course uncertain. S also adds "of the prophets" after "the books." ἀλλὰ I Pet. 1, 20 ἄνωθεν. ἦν γὰρ πνευματική, ὡς καὶ ὁ Ἰησοῦς ἡμῶν, ἐφανερώθη δὲ ἐπ̓ ἐσχάτων τῶν ἡμερῶν, ἵνα ἡμᾶς σώσῃ.
10. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 1.42-1.43 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)

11. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.14.6, 2.8.11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 1.29, 12.12-12.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.29. that noflesh should boast before God. 12.12. For as the body is one, and has many members, and all themembers of the body, being many, are one body; so also is Christ. 12.13. For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body, whetherJews or Greeks, whether bond or free; and were all given to drink intoone Spirit. 12.14. For the body is not one member, but many. 12.15. If the foot would say, "Because I'm not the hand, I'm not part of thebody," it is not therefore not part of the body. 12.16. If the earwould say, "Because I'm not the eye, I'm not part of the body," it'snot therefore not part of the body. 12.17. If the whole body were aneye, where would the hearing be? If the whole were hearing, where wouldthe smelling be? 12.18. But now God has set the members, each one ofthem, in the body, just as he desired. 12.19. If they were all onemember, where would the body be? 12.20. But now they are many members,but one body. 12.21. The eye can't tell the hand, "I have no need foryou," or again the head to the feet, "I have no need for you. 12.22. No, much rather, those members of the body which seem to be weaker arenecessary. 12.23. Those parts of the body which we think to be lesshonorable, on those we bestow more abundant honor; and ourunpresentable parts have more abundant propriety; 12.24. whereas ourpresentable parts have no such need. But God composed the bodytogether, giving more abundant honor to the inferior part 12.25. thatthere should be no division in the body, but that the members shouldhave the same care for one another. 12.26. When one member suffers,all the members suffer with it. Or when one member is honored, all themembers rejoice with it. 12.27. Now you are the body of Christ, and members individually. 12.28. God has set some in the assembly: first apostles, secondprophets, third teachers, then miracle workers, then gifts of healings,helps, governments, and various kinds of languages. 12.29. Are allapostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Are all miracle workers? 12.30. Do all have gifts of healings? Do all speak with variouslanguages? Do all interpret? 12.31. But earnestly desire the bestgifts. Moreover, I show a most excellent way to you.
13. New Testament, Acts, 17.24-17.31 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.24. The God who made the world and all things in it, he, being Lord of heaven and earth, dwells not in temples made with hands 17.25. neither is he served by men's hands, as though he needed anything, seeing he himself gives to all life and breath, and all things. 17.26. He made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the surface of the earth, having determined appointed seasons, and the bounds of their habitation 17.27. that they should seek the Lord, if perhaps they might reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us. 17.28. 'For in him we live, and move, and have our being.' As some of your own poets have said, 'For we are also his offspring.' 17.29. Being then the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Divine Nature is like gold, or silver, or stone, engraved by art and device of man. 17.30. The times of ignorance therefore God overlooked. But now he commands that all men everywhere should repent 17.31. because he has appointed a day in which he will judge the world in righteousness by the man whom he has ordained; whereof he has given assurance to all men, in that he has raised him from the dead.
14. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.22-1.23, 2.4, 2.17, 4.1-4.16, 4.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.22. He put all things in subjection under his feet, and gave him to be head over all things for the assembly 1.23. which is his body, the fullness of him who fills all in all. 2.4. But God, being rich in mercy, for his great love with which he loved us 2.17. He came and preached peace to you who were far off and to those who were near. 4.1. I therefore, the prisoner in the Lord, beg you to walk worthily of the calling with which you were called 4.2. with all lowliness and humility, with longsuffering, bearing with one another in love; 4.3. being eager to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. 4.4. There is one body, and one Spirit, even as you also were called in one hope of your calling; 4.5. one Lord, one faith, one baptism 4.6. one God and Father of all, who is over all, and through all, and in us all. 4.7. But to each one of us was the grace given according to the measure of the gift of Christ. 4.8. Therefore he says, "When he ascended on high, he led captivity captive, and gave gifts to men. 4.9. Now this, "He ascended," what is it but that he also first descended into the lower parts of the earth? 4.10. He who descended is the one who also ascended far above all the heavens, that he might fill all things. 4.11. He gave some to be apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, shepherds and teachers; 4.12. for the perfecting of the saints, to the work of serving, to the building up of the body of Christ; 4.13. until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a full grown man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ; 4.14. that we may no longer be children, tossed back and forth and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, in craftiness, after the wiles of error; 4.15. but speaking truth in love, we may grow up in all things into him, who is the head, Christ; 4.16. from whom all the body, being fitted and knit together through that which every joint supplies, according to the working in measure of each individual part, makes the body increase to the building up of itself in love. 4.25. Therefore, putting away falsehood, speak truth each one with his neighbor. For we are members one of another.
15. New Testament, Romans, 12.3-12.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.3. For I say, through the grace that was given me, to every man who is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think; but to think reasonably, as God has apportioned to each person a measure of faith. 12.4. For even as we have many members in one body, and all the members don't have the same function 12.5. so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another. 12.6. Having gifts differing according to the grace that was given to us, if prophecy, let us prophesy according to the proportion of our faith; 12.7. or service, let us give ourselves to service; or he who teaches, to his teaching; 12.8. or he who exhorts, to his exhorting: he who gives, let him do it with liberality; he who rules, with diligence; he who shows mercy, with cheerfulness.
16. New Testament, John, 17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. New Testament, Matthew, 25.31-25.46 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

25.31. But when the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the holy angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. 25.32. Before him all the nations will be gathered, and he will separate them one from another, as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 25.33. He will set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left. 25.34. Then the King will tell those on his right hand, 'Come, blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; 25.35. for I was hungry, and you gave me food to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me drink; I was a stranger, and you took me in; 25.36. naked, and you clothed me; I was sick, and you visited me; I was in prison, and you came to me.' 25.37. Then the righteous will answer him, saying, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry, and feed you; or thirsty, and give you a drink? 25.38. When did we see you as a stranger, and take you in; or naked, and clothe you? 25.39. When did we see you sick, or in prison, and come to you?' 25.40. The King will answer them, 'Most assuredly I tell you, inasmuch as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.' 25.41. Then he will say also to those on the left hand, 'Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire which is prepared for the devil and his angels; 25.42. for I was hungry, and you didn't give me food to eat; I was thirsty, and you gave me no drink; 25.43. I was a stranger, and you didn't take me in; naked, and you didn't clothe me; sick, and in prison, and you didn't visit me.' 25.44. Then they will also answer, saying, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry, or thirsty, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and didn't help you?' 25.45. Then he will answer them, saying, 'Most assuredly I tell you, inasmuch as you didn't do it to one of the least of these, you didn't do it to me.' 25.46. These will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.
18. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.1, 10.2, 10.4, 12.2, 18.2, 24.1-24.2, 25.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 12.120.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

20. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. Galen, On The Use of Parts, 11.14 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

22. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Irenaeus, Demonstration of The Apostolic Teaching, 12, 22, 24-25, 38, 60, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 5.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Justin: For since you have read, O Trypho, as you yourself admitted, the doctrines taught by our Saviour, I do not think that I have done foolishly in adding some short utterances of His to the prophetic statements. Wash therefore, and be now clean, and put away iniquity from your souls, as God bids you be washed in this laver, and be circumcised with the true circumcision. For we too would observe the fleshly circumcision, and the Sabbaths, and in short all the feasts, if we did not know for what reason they were enjoined you - namely, on account of your transgressions and the hardness of your hearts. For if we patiently endure all things contrived against us by wicked men and demons, so that even amid cruelties unutterable, death and torments, we pray for mercy to those who inflict such things upon us, and do not wish to give the least retort to any one, even as the new Lawgiver commanded us: how is it, Trypho, that we would not observe those rites which do not harm us- I speak of fleshly circumcision, and Sabbaths, and feasts?
25. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 5.27, 7.48 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Maximus of Tyre, Dialexeis, 11.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 5.1, 14.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Tertullian, Against Marcion, 1.16 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.16. Since, then, that other world does not appear, nor its god either, the only resource left to them is to divide things into the two classes of visible and invisible, with two gods for their authors, and so to claim the invisible for their own, (the supreme) God. But who, except an heretical spirit, could ever bring his mind to believe that the invisible part of creation belongs to him who had previously displayed no visible thing, rather than to Him who, by His operation on the visible world, produced a belief in the invisible also, since it is far more reasonable to give one's assent after some samples (of a work) than after none? We shall see to what author even (your favourite) apostle attributes Colossians 1:16 the invisible creation, when we come to examine him. At present (we withhold his testimony), for we are for the most part engaged in preparing the way, by means of common sense and fair arguments, for a belief in the future support of the Scriptures also. We affirm, then, that this diversity of things visible and invisible must on this ground be attributed to the Creator, even because the whole of His work consists of diversities - of things corporeal and incorporeal; of animate and iimate; of vocal and mute of moveable and stationary; of productive and sterile; of arid and moist; of hot and cold. Man, too, is himself similarly tempered with diversity, both in his body and in his sensation. Some of his members are strong, others weak; some comely, others uncomely; some twofold, others unique; some like, others unlike. In like manner there is diversity also in his sensation: now joy, then anxiety; now love, then hatred; now anger, then calmness. Since this is the case, inasmuch as the whole of this creation of ours has been fashioned with a reciprocal rivalry among its several parts, the invisible ones are due to the visible, and not to be ascribed to any other author than Him to whom their counterparts are imputed, marking as they do diversity in the Creator Himself, who orders what He forbade, and forbids what He ordered; who also strikes and heals. Why do they take Him to be uniform in one class of things alone, as the Creator of visible things, and only them; whereas He ought to be believed to have created both the visible and the invisible, in just the same way as life and death, or as evil things and peace? And verily, if the invisible creatures are greater than the visible, which are in their own sphere great, so also is it fitting that the greater should be His to whom the great belong; because neither the great, nor indeed the greater, can be suitable property for one who seems to possess not even the smallest things.
29. Tertullian, Apology, 48.11 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

30. Augustine, Confessions, 9.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

9.10. 23. As the day now approached on which she was to depart this life (which day Thou knew, we did not), it fell out - Thou, as I believe, by Your secret ways arranging it - that she and I stood alone, leaning in a certain window, from which the garden of the house we occupied at Ostia could be seen; at which place, removed from the crowd, we were resting ourselves for the voyage, after the fatigues of a long journey. We then were conversing alone very pleasantly; and, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, Philippians 3:13 we were seeking between ourselves in the presence of the Truth, which You are, of what nature the eternal life of the saints would be, which eye has not seen, nor ear heard, neither has entered into the heart of man. But yet we opened wide the mouth of our heart, after those supernal streams of Your fountain, the fountain of life, which is with You; that being sprinkled with it according to our capacity, we might in some measure weigh so high a mystery. 24. And when our conversation had arrived at that point, that the very highest pleasure of the carnal senses, and that in the very brightest material light, seemed by reason of the sweetness of that life not only not worthy of comparison, but not even of mention, we, lifting ourselves with a more ardent affection towards the Selfsame, did gradually pass through all corporeal things, and even the heaven itself, whence sun, and moon, and stars shine upon the earth; yea, we soared higher yet by inward musing, and discoursing, and admiring Your works; and we came to our own minds, and went beyond them, that we might advance as high as that region of unfailing plenty, where You feed Israel for ever with the food of truth, and where life is that Wisdom by whom all these things are made, both which have been, and which are to come; and she is not made, but is as she has been, and so shall ever be; yea, rather, to have been, and to be hereafter, are not in her, but only to be, seeing she is eternal, for to have been and to be hereafter are not eternal. And while we were thus speaking, and straining after her, we slightly touched her with the whole effort of our heart; and we sighed, and there left bound the first-fruits of the Spirit; Romans 8:23 and returned to the noise of our own mouth, where the word uttered has both beginning and end. And what is like Your Word, our Lord, who remains in Himself without becoming old, and makes all things new? Wisdom 7:27 25. We were saying, then, If to any man the tumult of the flesh were silenced - silenced the phantasies of earth, waters, and air - silenced, too, the poles; yea, the very soul be silenced to herself, and go beyond herself by not thinking of herself - silenced fancies and imaginary revelations, every tongue, and every sign, and whatsoever exists by passing away, since, if any could hearken, all these say, We created not ourselves, but were created by Him who abides for ever: If, having uttered this, they now should be silenced, having only quickened our ears to Him who created them, and He alone speak not by them, but by Himself, that we may hear His word, not by fleshly tongue, nor angelic voice, nor sound of thunder, nor the obscurity of a similitude, but might hear Him - Him whom in these we love- without these, like as we two now strained ourselves, and with rapid thought touched on that Eternal Wisdom which remains over all. If this could be sustained, and other visions of a far different kind be withdrawn, and this one ravish, and absorb, and envelope its beholder amid these inward joys, so that his life might be eternally like that one moment of knowledge which we now sighed after, were not this Enter into the joy of Your Lord? Matthew 25:21 And when shall that be? When we shall all rise again; but all shall not be changed. 26. Such things was I saying; and if not after this manner, and in these words, yet, Lord, You know, that in that day when we were talking thus, this world with all its delights grew contemptible to us, even while we spoke. Then said my mother, Son, for myself, I have no longer any pleasure in anything in this life. What I want here further, and why I am here, I know not, now that my hopes in this world are satisfied. There was indeed one thing for which I wished to tarry a little in this life, and that was that I might see you a Catholic Christian before I died. My God has exceeded this abundantly, so that I see you despising all earthly felicity, made His servant - what do I here?


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accustoming Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93
adam Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
ailios aristeides Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172
anthropology Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 219, 224, 229
assimilation Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197, 198, 219
athenagoras Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 207, 234, 235, 244
augustine Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28
behr,j. Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 224
body,soul and spirit Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 219, 224
body Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 224
body metaphor Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
breath and spirit Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 224
cicero Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172
clement of alexandria Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 234, 235, 244
council of the areopagos Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 218
creatio ex nihilo Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 72
decalogue Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 183
demiurge Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 72
devil Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 244
dion of prousa Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172
divine architect Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93
divine artist Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 198
divine economy Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93
divine intellect Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28, 29, 30
ebionites Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
economy Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93
empedokles Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 235
epiktetos Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
eternal life Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 229
ethics Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 244
evil Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 219, 244
fall,the Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 219
fall Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
fitness Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197
flesh Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 224, 229, 244
flesh and glory Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 229
flesh and spirit Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 229
freedom Behr (2000), Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement, 42
gifts,from god Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 64
glory,of god Behr (2000), Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement, 42
glory,transformation into Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
glory of god Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 229, 244
glory of man Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197
glory of the lord Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 198
gnostic aeons Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 29
gnostic christians Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 207
god,attributes of Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28, 29, 30
god,oneness of Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28
god,uniqueness of Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 207
god,unity of Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 207
god and man Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28
god as omnipotent Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28, 53
god as opulent Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28, 29, 30
god as supreme king and wise architect Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 53
greek/barbarian division Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 234, 235
growth,in irenaeus' anthropology" Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
hands of god Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93, 198
harmonia Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 234
harmony Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 198
harmony of opposites Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172
hermetic writers Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
holy spirit Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 224
homonoia Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172, 234
homonymy,image of god Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 64
homonymy,incarnation Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
humanity Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93
humankind,unity of Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 218
humans united with god Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 218, 244
image and likeness Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93, 197, 198
immortality Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 249
intellect Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28, 29, 30
irenaeus Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 183; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 207, 218, 234, 235, 244
justin martyr Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 72; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
knowledge of god Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
likeness of god Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 64
man,growth of Behr (2000), Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement, 42, 124
marcion Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 30
marcus aurelius Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172, 244
martyrdom Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 244
martyrs Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 244
mary Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108, 229
matter Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 72
maturation Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 64
middle platonism Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
moral transformation Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
musical metaphors Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 234
new testament Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 235
omnipotence Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28, 29, 30
parables Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197
participation Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197, 198, 219, 224, 229, 244
pax romana Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
perfection Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108, 219
philia,philoi Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 218
philon of alexandreia Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 218
philosophy Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 30
plato Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 235
platonic forms Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 29
pleroma Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 28
plutarch Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
poseidonios Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 235
pseudo–aristotle,on the kosmos Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172, 244
pythagoreans Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197
recapitulation Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
reciprocity of salvation Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
reconciliation Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
resurrection,connection to morality' Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
resurrection Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 183; Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93
resurrection of the flesh Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 229
rousseau,a. Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 82
salvation Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
salvation of the flesh Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 229
satan Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 244
son of god Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
spirit Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 219, 224
stoic thought Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172, 234, 244
sumphonia Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 234
tatianos (tatian) Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 207, 218, 234, 244
temporality Behr (2000), Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement, 42
tertullian Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 235
theological aesthetic Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197, 198
time Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197
transcendence of god Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 30
transmission of ideas Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244
trinity Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93, 198
truth Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 108
typology and economy Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 197, 198
unity of man Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 219
universe,harmony of the Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172, 234, 235, 244
universe and the city Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 172
valentinians Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 72; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 207
virtue Behr (2000), Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement, 124
vivification Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 224
word,the Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 93
word of god Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 229