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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6793
Irenaeus, Refutation Of All Heresies, 4.20.5


nanThese things did the prophets set forth in a prophetical manner; but they did not, as some allege, [proclaim] that He who was seen by the prophets was a different [God], the Father of all being invisible. Yet this is what those [heretics] declare, who are altogether ignorant of the nature of prophecy. For prophecy is a prediction of things future, that is, a setting forth beforehand of those things which shall be afterwards. The prophets, then, indicated beforehand that God should be seen by men; as the Lord also says, "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God." But in respect to His greatness, and His wonderful glory, "no man shall see God and live," for the Father is incomprehensible; but in regard to His love, and kindness, and as to His infinite power, even this He grants to those who love Him, that is, to see God, which thing the prophets did also predict. "For those things that are impossible with men, are possible with God." For man does not see God by his own powers; but when He pleases He is seen by men, by whom He wills, and when He wills, and as He wills. For God is powerful in all things, having been seen at that time indeed, prophetically through the Spirit, and seen, too, adoptively through the Son; and He shall also be seen paternally in the kingdom of heaven, the Spirit truly preparing man in the Son of God, and the Son leading him to the Father, while the Father, too, confers [upon him] incorruption for eternal life, which comes to every one from the fact of his seeing God. For as those who see the light are within the light, and partake of its brilliancy; even so, those who see God are in God, and receive of His splendour. But [His] splendour vivifies them; those, therefore, who see God, do receive life. And for this reason, He, [although] beyond comprehension, and boundless and invisible, rendered Himself visible, and comprehensible, and within the capacity of those who believe, that He might vivify those who receive and behold Him through faith. For as His greatness is past finding out, so also His goodness is beyond expression; by which having been seen, He bestows life upon those who see Him. It is not possible to live apart from life, and the means of life is found in fellowship with God; but fellowship with God is to know God, and to enjoy His goodness.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

25 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 33.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

33.20. And He said: ‘Thou canst not see My face, for man shall not see Me and live.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 37.11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

37.11. וַעֲנָוִים יִירְשׁוּ־אָרֶץ וְהִתְעַנְּגוּ עַל־רֹב שָׁלוֹם׃ 37.11. But the humble shall inherit the land, and delight themselves in the abundance of peace."
3. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 42.5, 45.5-45.6, 57.16 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

42.5. כֹּה־אָמַר הָאֵל יְהוָה בּוֹרֵא הַשָּׁמַיִם וְנוֹטֵיהֶם רֹקַע הָאָרֶץ וְצֶאֱצָאֶיהָ נֹתֵן נְשָׁמָה לָעָם עָלֶיהָ וְרוּחַ לַהֹלְכִים בָּהּ׃ 45.5. אֲנִי יְהוָה וְאֵין עוֹד זוּלָתִי אֵין אֱלֹהִים אֲאַזֶּרְךָ וְלֹא יְדַעְתָּנִי׃ 45.6. לְמַעַן יֵדְעוּ מִמִּזְרַח־שֶׁמֶשׁ וּמִמַּעֲרָבָהּ כִּי־אֶפֶס בִּלְעָדָי אֲנִי יְהוָה וְאֵין עוֹד׃ 57.16. כִּי לֹא לְעוֹלָם אָרִיב וְלֹא לָנֶצַח אֶקְּצוֹף כִּי־רוּחַ מִלְּפָנַי יַעֲטוֹף וּנְשָׁמוֹת אֲנִי עָשִׂיתִי׃ 42.5. Thus saith God the LORD, He that created the heavens, and stretched them forth, He that spread forth the earth and that which cometh out of it, He that giveth breath unto the people upon it, And spirit to them that walk therein:" 45.5. I am the LORD, and there is none else, beside Me there is no God; I have girded thee, though thou hast not known Me;" 45.6. That they may know from the rising of the sun, and from the west, that there is none beside Me; I am the LORD; and there is none else;" 57.16. For I will not contend for ever, Neither will I be always wroth; For the spirit that enwrappeth itself is from Me, And the souls which I have made."
4. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

29e. constructed Becoming and the All. He was good, and in him that is good no envy ariseth ever concerning anything; and being devoid of envy He desired that all should be, so far as possible, like unto Himself. Tim. This principle, then, we shall be wholly right in accepting from men of wisdom as being above all the supreme originating principle of Becoming and the Cosmos.
5. Anon., Didache, 1.5, 3.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. New Testament, 1 Peter, 4.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.14. If you are insulted for the name of Christ, blessed are you; because the Spirit of glory and of God rests on you. On their part he is blasphemed, but on your part he is glorified.
7. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 13.9-13.10, 15.50 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13.9. For we know in part, and we prophesy in part; 13.10. but when thatwhich is complete has come, then that which is partial will be doneaway with. 15.50. Now I say this, brothers, that flesh and blood can'tinherit the Kingdom of God; neither does corruption inheritincorruption.
8. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 1.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. New Testament, Acts, 8.26-8.40 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.26. But an angel of the Lord spoke to Philip, saying, "Arise, and go toward the south to the way that goes down from Jerusalem to Gaza. This is a desert. 8.27. He arose and went. Behold, there was a man of Ethiopia, a eunuch of great authority under Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, who was over all her treasure, who had come to Jerusalem to worship. 8.28. He was returning and sitting in his chariot, and was reading the prophet Isaiah. 8.29. The Spirit said to Philip, "Go near, and join yourself to this chariot. 8.30. Philip ran to him, and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet, and said, "Do you understand what you are reading? 8.31. He said, "How can I, unless someone explains it to me?" He begged Philip to come up and sit with him. 8.32. Now the passage of the Scripture which he was reading was this, "He was led as a sheep to the slaughter. As a lamb before his shearer is silent, So he doesn't open his mouth. 8.33. In his humiliation, his judgment was taken away. Who will declare His generations? For his life is taken from the earth. 8.34. The eunuch answered Philip, "Please tell who the prophet is talking about: about himself, or about some other? 8.35. Philip opened his mouth, and beginning from this Scripture, preached to him Jesus. 8.36. As they went on the way, they came to some water, and the eunuch said, "Behold, here is water. What is keeping me from being baptized? 8.38. He commanded the chariot to stand still, and they both went down into the water, both Philip and the eunuch, and he baptized him. 8.39. When they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught Philip away, and the eunuch didn't see him any more, for he went on his way rejoicing. 8.40. But Philip was found at Azotus. Passing through, he preached the gospel to all the cities, until he came to Caesarea.
10. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.13-1.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.13. in whom you also, having heard the word of the truth, the gospel of your salvation, -- in whom, having also believed, you were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise 1.14. who is a pledge of our inheritance, to the redemption of God's own possession, to the praise of his glory.
11. New Testament, Romans, 8.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.15. For you didn't receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father!
12. New Testament, John, 1.4, 17.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.4. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. 17.5. Now, Father, glorify me with your own self with the glory which I had with you before the world existed.
13. New Testament, Luke, 6.20-6.22, 6.24-6.26, 6.31, 6.36-6.38 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.20. He lifted up his eyes to his disciples, and said, "Blessed are you poor, For yours is the Kingdom of God. 6.21. Blessed are you who hunger now, For you will be filled. Blessed are you who weep now, For you will laugh. 6.22. Blessed are you when men shall hate you, and when they shall separate you from them and reproach you, and throw out your name as evil, for the Son of Man's sake. 6.24. But woe to you who are rich! For you have received your consolation. 6.25. Woe to you, you who are full now! For you will be hungry. Woe to you who laugh now! For you will mourn and weep. 6.26. Woe, when men speak well of you! For their fathers did the same thing to the false prophets. 6.31. As you would like people to do to you, do exactly so to them. 6.36. Therefore be merciful, Even as your Father is also merciful. 6.37. Don't judge, And you won't be judged. Don't condemn, And you won't be condemned. Set free, And you will be set free. 6.38. Give, and it will be given to you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, and running over, will be given to you. For with the same measure you measure it will be measured back to you.
14. New Testament, Matthew, 5.4-5.5, 5.7-5.8, 5.10-5.12, 6.14, 7.1-7.2, 11.27 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.4. Blessed are those who mourn, For they shall be comforted. 5.5. Blessed are the gentle, For they shall inherit the earth. 5.7. Blessed are the merciful, For they shall obtain mercy. 5.8. Blessed are the pure in heart, For they shall see God. 5.10. Blessed are those who have been persecuted for righteousness' sake, For theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven. 5.11. Blessed are you when people reproach you, persecute you, and say all kinds of evil against you falsely, for my sake. 5.12. Rejoice, and be exceedingly glad, for great is your reward in heaven. For that is how they persecuted the prophets who were before you. 6.14. For if you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. 7.1. Don't judge, so that you won't be judged. 7.2. For with whatever judgment you judge, you will be judged; and with whatever measure you measure, it will be measured to you. 11.27. All things have been delivered to me by my Father. No one knows the Son, except the Father; neither does anyone know the Father, except the Son, and he to whom the Son desires to reveal him.
15. Polycarp of Smyrna, Letter To The Philippians, 2.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Anon., Acts of Paul, 3.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

17. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 5.23.3, 6.41.2-6.41.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

19. Irenaeus, Demonstration of The Apostolic Teaching, 30, 43, 7, 11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Tertullian, Against The Valentinians, 1.1-1.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. Athanasius, Defense Against The Arians, 1.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

22. Nag Hammadi, The Gospel of Thomas, 54 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Origen, Against Celsus, 7.44 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.44. Celsus supposes that we may arrive at a knowledge of God either by combining or separating certain things after the methods which mathematicians call synthesis and analysis, or again by analogy, which is employed by them also, and that in this way we may as it were gain admission to the chief good. But when the Word of God says, No man knows the Father but the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal Him, He declares that no one can know God but by the help of divine grace coming from above, with a certain divine inspiration. Indeed, it is reasonable to suppose that the knowledge of God is beyond the reach of human nature, and hence the many errors into which men have fallen in their views of God. It is, then, through the goodness and love of God to mankind, and by a marvellous exercise of divine grace to those whom He saw in His foreknowledge, and knew that they would walk worthy of Him who had made Himself known to them, and that they would never swerve from a faithful attachment to His service, although they were condemned to death or held up to ridicule by those who, in ignorance of what true religion is, give that name to what deserves to be called anything rather than religion. God doubtless saw the pride and arrogance of those who, with contempt for all others, boast of their knowledge of God, and of their profound acquaintance with divine things obtained from philosophy, but who still, not less even than the most ignorant, run after their images, and temples, and famous mysteries; and seeing this, He has chosen the foolish things of this world - the simplest of Christians, who lead, however, a life of greater moderation and purity than many philosophers- to confound the wise, who are not ashamed to address iimate things as gods or images of the gods. For what reasonable man can refrain from smiling when he sees that one who has learned from philosophy such profound and noble sentiments about God or the gods, turns straightway to images and offers to them his prayers, or imagines that by gazing upon these material things he can ascend from the visible symbol to that which is spiritual and immaterial. But a Christian, even of the common people, is assured that every place forms part of the universe, and that the whole universe is God's temple. In whatever part of the world he is, he prays; but he rises above the universe, shutting the eyes of sense, and raising upwards the eyes of the soul. And he stops not at the vault of heaven; but passing in thought beyond the heavens, under the guidance of the Spirit of God, and having thus as it had gone beyond the visible universe, he offers prayers to God. But he prays for no trivial blessings, for he has learned from Jesus to seek for nothing small or mean, that is, sensible objects, but to ask only for what is great and truly divine; and these things God grants to us, to lead us to that blessedness which is found only with Him through His Son, the Word, who is God.
24. Origen, On First Principles, 1.1.8-1.1.9 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.1.8. But perhaps these declarations may seem to have less weight with those who wish to be instructed in divine things out of the holy Scriptures, and who seek to have it proved to them from that source how the nature of God surpasses the nature of bodies. See, therefore, if the apostle does not say the same thing, when, speaking of Christ, he declares, that He is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of every creature. Not, as some suppose, that the nature of God is visible to some and invisible to others: for the apostle does not say the image of God invisible to men or invisible to sinners, but with unvarying constancy pronounces on the nature of God in these words: the image of the invisible God. Moreover, John, in his Gospel, when asserting that no one has seen God at any time, manifestly declares to all who are capable of understanding, that there is no nature to which God is visible: not as if, He were a being who was visible by nature, and merely escaped or baffled the view of a frailer creature, but because by the nature of His being it is impossible for Him to be seen. And if you should ask of me what is my opinion regarding the Only-begotten Himself, whether the nature of God, which is naturally invisible, be not visible even to Him, let not such a question appear to you at once to be either absurd or impious, because we shall give you a logical reason. It is one thing to see, and another to know: to see and to be seen is a property of bodies; to know and to be known, an attribute of intellectual being. Whatever, therefore, is a property of bodies, cannot be predicated either of the Father or of the Son; but what belongs to the nature of deity is common to the Father and the Son. Finally, even He Himself, in the Gospel, did not say that no one has seen the Father, save the Son, nor any one the Son, save the Father; but His words are: No one knows the Son, save the Father; nor any one the Father, save the Son. By which it is clearly shown, that whatever among bodily natures is called seeing and being seen, is termed, between the Father and the Son, a knowing and being known, by means of the power of knowledge, not by the frailness of the sense of sight. Because, then, neither seeing nor being seen can be properly applied to an incorporeal and invisible nature, neither is the Father, in the Gospel, said to be seen by the Son, nor the Son by the Father, but the one is said to be known by the other. 1.1.9. Here, if any one lay before us the passage where it is said, Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God, from that very passage, in my opinion, will our position derive additional strength; for what else is seeing God in heart, but, according to our exposition as above, understanding and knowing Him with the mind? For the names of the organs of sense are frequently applied to the soul, so that it may be said to see with the eyes of the heart, i.e., to perform an intellectual act by means of the power of intelligence. So also it is said to hear with the ears when it perceives the deeper meaning of a statement. So also we say that it makes use of teeth, when it chews and eats the bread of life which comes down from heaven. In like manner, also, it is said to employ the services of other members, which are transferred from their bodily appellations, and applied to the powers of the soul, according to the words of Solomon, You will find a divine sense. For he knew that there were within us two kinds of senses: the one mortal, corruptible, human; the other immortal and intellectual, which he now termed divine. By this divine sense, therefore, not of the eyes, but of a pure heart, which is the mind, God may be seen by those who are worthy. For you will certainly find in all the Scriptures, both old and new, the term heart repeatedly used instead of mind, i.e., intellectual power. In this manner, therefore, although far below the dignity of the subject, have we spoken of the nature of God, as those who understand it under the limitation of the human understanding. In the next place, let us see what is meant by the name of Christ.
25. Anon., Gospel of Thomas, 54



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327
accustoming Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 81
adam Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 67
ando, clifford Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 254
anthropology Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 221, 224
arius and arians, lived religion in alexandria and Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 254
arius and arians, material images, nature of Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 254
arius and arians, on visuality and divine nature Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 254
beatitudes, apostolic fathers Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 433, 441
beatitudes, christian apocrypha Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 442
beatitudes, irenaeus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 441, 442
beatitudes, kingdom of god Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 433
beatitudes, reception history Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 433, 441, 442
beatitudes Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 433, 441, 442
behr, j. Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 224
bible Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 168
body, soul and spirit Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 224
body Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 224
body and soul Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 221
breath and spirit Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 221, 224
charisma Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 168
christ Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 85
christology Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 113
death Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 221
divine economy Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 81, 85, 91
divine intellect Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30, 32
donovan, m. a. Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 56
economy Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 33; Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 81, 85, 91
elsner, jaś Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 254
enjoyment Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 108
epicurus and epicureans Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85
eschatology Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 85
eucharist Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 203
father, son and spirit Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 91
flesh Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 206, 208, 221, 224
glory, of god Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 56
glory of god Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 203, 204, 206, 208
gnostic dualism Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 113, 118
god, attributes of Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30, 32
god as opulent Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30, 32
hands of god Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 91
heresiologists Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 153
history and salvation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 203, 204, 206
holy spirit, and man Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 108
holy spirit, as life-creating Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 56
holy spirit Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 224
homonymy, immortality Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 67
homonymy, incarnation Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 67
homonymy, incorruptibility Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 67
human development Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85
humanity Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 118
hypothesis, of scripture Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 33
immortality Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 118
inauguration of new life Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 118
incarnation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85, 113, 118, 204, 208
intellect Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30, 32
irenaeus Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 85; Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 153; Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 441, 442
irenaeus of lyons, arian theology and Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 254
john, gospel of Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 153
justin martyr Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 168
kingdom of god, temporal dimensions Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 433
law and prophets Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327
life Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 56, 108
logos, of god Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 56
love Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 67
love of truth Osborne, Clement of Alexandria (2010) 60
marcion Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30
mary Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 118
matthew, gospel of Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 153
maturation' Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 67
metaphysic of mind Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 32
moses Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327
new adam Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 118
omnipotence Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30
origen, arian theology and Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 254
participation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 168, 203, 204, 206, 208, 221, 224
perception Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 203
person of christ Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 113
philosophy Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30, 32
pontus Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327
prophetic vision Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 168
prophets Osborne, Clement of Alexandria (2010) 60
protology Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 85
providence Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85
recapitulation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 81, 113, 118
revelation Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327; Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85, 168, 206
scripture Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 33
seeing god, beatitudes, irenaeus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 441, 442
seeing god Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 441, 442
son Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327
son of god Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 113
soul Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327
spirit Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 91, 168, 221, 224
steenberg, m. Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 67
temporality Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 33
time Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 206
transcendence of god Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 30
transfiguration Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 206
trinity Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85, 91
unity of faith Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 206
unity of history Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85
unity of the trinity Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85
unknown, god Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 327
valentinians Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 208
vision, of god Behr, Asceticism and Anthropology in Irenaeus and Clement (2000) 33, 56, 85, 108
vision of god Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 203, 204, 206
vivification Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 224
word, the Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 85, 206
word incarnate Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 168
word of god Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 206
xenophanes Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 32