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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6793
Irenaeus, Refutation Of All Heresies, 3.3.2


nanSince, however, it would be very tedious, in such a volume as this, to reckon up the successions of all the Churches, we do put to confusion all those who, in whatever manner, whether by an evil self-pleasing, by vainglory, or by blindness and perverse opinion, assemble in unauthorized meetings; [we do this, I say,] by indicating that tradition derived from the apostles, of the very great, the very ancient, and universally known Church founded and organized at Rome by the two most glorious apostles, Peter and Paul; as also [by pointing out] the faith preached to men, which comes down to our time by means of the successions of the bishops. For it is a matter of necessity that every Church should agree with this Church, on account of its pre- eminent authority, that is, the faithful everywhere, inasmuch as the apostolical tradition has been preserved continuously by those [faithful men] who exist everywhere.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

36 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 14.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

14.8. וְאֶת־הַחֲזִיר כִּי־מַפְרִיס פַּרְסָה הוּא וְלֹא גֵרָה טָמֵא הוּא לָכֶם מִבְּשָׂרָם לֹא תֹאכֵלוּ וּבְנִבְלָתָם לֹא תִגָּעוּ׃ 14.8. and the swine, because he parteth the hoof but cheweth not the cud, he is unclean unto you; of their flesh ye shall not eat, and their carcasses ye shall not touch."
2. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 11.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

11.7. וְאֶת־הַחֲזִיר כִּי־מַפְרִיס פַּרְסָה הוּא וְשֹׁסַע שֶׁסַע פַּרְסָה וְהוּא גֵּרָה לֹא־יִגָּר טָמֵא הוּא לָכֶם׃ 11.7. And the swine, because he parteth the hoof, and is cloven-footed, but cheweth not the cud, he is unclean unto you."
3. Dead Sea Scrolls, Community Rule, 5.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ignatius, To The Ephesians, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Ignatius, To The Romans, 3-5, 2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Ignatius, To The Smyrnaeans, 1.2, 8.1-8.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. New Testament, 1 John, 2.9-2.11, 3.23-3.24, 4.7-4.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.9. He who says he is in the light and hates his brother, is in the darkness even until now. 2.10. He who loves his brother remains in the light, and there is no occasion for stumbling in him. 2.11. But he who hates his brother is in the darkness, and walks in the darkness, and doesn't know where he is going, because the darkness has blinded his eyes. 3.23. This is his commandment, that we should believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ, and love one another, even as he commanded. 3.24. He who keeps his commandments remains in him, and he in him. By this we know that he remains in us, by the Spirit which he gave us. 4.7. Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God; and everyone who loves is born of God, and knows God. 4.8. He who doesn't love doesn't know God, for God is love. 4.9. By this was God's love revealed in us, that God has sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. 4.10. In this is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son as the atoning sacrifice for our sins. 4.11. Beloved, if God loved us in this way, we also ought to love one another.
8. New Testament, 1 Peter, 1.22-1.23, 2.16-2.17, 4.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.22. Seeing you have purified your souls in your obedience to the truth through the Spirit in sincere brotherly affection, love one another from the heart fervently: 1.23. having been born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, through the word of God, which lives and remains forever. 2.16. as free, and not using your freedom for a cloak of wickedness, but as bondservants of God. 2.17. Honor all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the king. 4.8. And above all things be earnest in your love among yourselves, for love covers a multitude of sins.
9. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 4.9-4.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.9. But concerning brotherly love, you have no need that one write to you. For you yourselves are taught by God to love one another 4.10. for indeed you do it toward all the brothers who are in all Macedonia. But we exhort you, brothers, that you abound more and more;
10. New Testament, 2 John, 5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. New Testament, 2 Peter, 1.5-1.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.5. Yes, and for this very cause adding on your part all diligence, in your faith supply moral excellence; and in moral excellence, knowledge; 1.6. and in knowledge, self-control; and in self-control patience; and in patience godliness; 1.7. and in godliness brotherly affection; and in brotherly affection, love.
12. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 2.17, 4.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 2.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.22. Flee from youthful lusts; but pursue righteousness, faith, love, and peace with those who call on the Lord out of a pure heart.
14. New Testament, Acts, 8.23, 23.13-23.15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.23. For I see that you are in the gall of bitterness and in the bondage of iniquity. 23.13. There were more than forty people who had made this conspiracy. 23.14. They came to the chief priests and the elders, and said, "We have bound ourselves under a great curse, to taste nothing until we have killed Paul. 23.15. Now therefore, you with the council inform the commanding officer that he should bring him down to you tomorrow, as though you were going to judge his case more exactly. We are ready to kill him before he comes near.
15. New Testament, Colossians, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.2. that their hearts may be comforted, they being knit together in love, and gaining all riches of the full assurance of understanding, that they may know the mystery of God, both of the Father and of Christ
16. New Testament, Ephesians, 4.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.3. being eager to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.
17. New Testament, Galatians, 2.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.4. Thiswas because of the false brothers secretly brought in, who stole in tospy out our liberty which we have in Christ Jesus, that they mightbring us into bondage;
18. New Testament, Hebrews, 13.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13.1. Let brotherly love continue.
19. New Testament, Philippians, 2.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.4. each of you not just looking to his own things, but each of you also to the things of others.
20. New Testament, Romans, 12.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.10. In love of the brothers be tenderly affectionate one to another; in honor preferring one another;
21. New Testament, John, 11.52, 13.34-13.35, 14.9, 17.11, 17.20-17.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11.52. and not for the nation only, but that he might also gather together into one the children of God who are scattered abroad. 13.34. A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, just like I have loved you; that you also love one another. 13.35. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another. 14.9. Jesus said to him, "Have I been with you such a long time, and do you not know me, Philip? He who has seen me has seen the Father. How do you say, 'Show us the Father?' 17.11. I am no more in the world, but these are in the world, and I am coming to you. Holy Father, keep them through your name which you have given me, that they may be one, even as we are. 17.20. Not for these only do I pray, but for those also who believe in me through their word 17.21. that they may all be one; even as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be one in us; that the world may believe that you sent me. 17.22. The glory which you have given me, I have given to them; that they may be one, even as we are one; 17.23. I in them, and you in me, that they may be perfected into one; that the world may know that you sent me, and loved them, even as you loved me.
22. New Testament, Mark, 1.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.24. saying, "Ha! What do we have to do with you, Jesus, you Nazarene? Have you come to destroy us? I know you who you are: the Holy One of God!
23. New Testament, Matthew, 7.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7.5. You hypocrite! First remove the beam out of your own eye, and then you can see clearly to remove the speck out of your brother's eye.
24. Tacitus, Annals, 15.40 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.40.  Only on the sixth day, was the conflagration brought to an end at the foot of the Esquiline, by demolishing the buildings over a vast area and opposing to the unabated fury of the flames a clear tract of ground and an open horizon. But fear had not yet been laid aside, nor had hope yet returned to the people, when the fire resumed its ravages; in the less congested parts of the city, however; so that, while the toll of human life was not so great, the destruction of temples and of porticoes dedicated to pleasure was on a wider scale. The second fire produced the greater scandal of the two, as it had broken out on Aemilian property of Tigellinus and appearances suggested that Nero was seeking the glory of founding a new capital and endowing it with his own name. Rome, in fact, is divided into fourteen regions, of which four remained intact, while three were laid level with the ground: in the other seven nothing survived but a few dilapidated and half-burned relics of houses.
25. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 1.2, 5.1, 8.1, 19.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.2. 2 For he waited to be betrayed as also the Lord had done, that we too might become his imitators, "not thinking of ourselves alone, but also of our neighbours." For it is the mark of true and steadfast love, not to wish that oneself may be saved alone, but all the brethren also. 5.1. 1 But the most wonderful Polycarp, when he first heard it, was not disturbed, but wished to remain in the city; but the majority persuaded him to go away quietly, and he went out quietly to a farm, not far distant from the city, and stayed with a few friends, doing nothing but pray night and day for all, and for the Churches throughout the world, as was his custom. 8.1. 1 Now when he had at last finished his prayer, after remembering all who had ever even come his way, both small and great, high and low, and the whole Catholic Church throughout the world, the hour came for departure, and they set him on an ass, and led him into the city, on a "great Sabbath day. 19.1. 1 Such was the lot of the blessed Polycarp, who though he was, together with those from Philadelphia, the twelfth martyr in Smyrna, is alone especially remembered by all, so that he is spoken of in every place, even by the heathen. He was not only a famous teacher, but also a notable martyr, whose martyrdom all desire to imitate, for it followed the Gospel of Christ.
26. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 4.9.73.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Hermas, Similitudes, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Hermas, Visions, 3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

30. Irenaeus, Demonstration of The Apostolic Teaching, 47 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. Tertullian, Against Praxeas, 1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

32. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 20.4-20.9, 21.4, 21.7, 36.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

33. Tertullian, On Modesty, 21.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

34. Tertullian, Antidote For The Scorpion'S Sting, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Now, then, the epistles of the apostles also are well known. And do we, (you say), in all respects guileless souls and doves merely, love to go astray? I should think from eagerness to live. But let it be so, that meaning departs from their epistles. And yet, that the apostles endured such sufferings, we know: the teaching is clear. This only I perceive in running through the Acts. I am not at all on the search. The prisons there, and the bonds, and the scourges, and the big stones, and the swords, and the onsets by the Jews, and the assemblies of the heathen, and the indictments by tribunes, and the hearing of causes by kings, and the judgment-seats of proconsuls and the name of C sar, do not need an interpreter. That Peter is struck, that Stephen is overwhelmed by stones, Acts 7:59 that James is slain as is a victim at the altar, that Paul is beheaded has been written in their own blood. And if a heretic wishes his confidence to rest upon a public record, the archives of the empire will speak, as would the stones of Jerusalem. We read the lives of the C sars: At Rome Nero was the first who stained with blood the rising faith. Then is Peter girt by another, John 21:18 when he is made fast to the cross. Then does Paul obtain a birth suited to Roman citizenship, when in Rome he springs to life again ennobled by martyrdom. Wherever I read of these occurrences, so soon as I do so, I learn to suffer; nor does it signify to me which I follow as teachers of martyrdom, whether the declarations or the deaths of the apostles, save that in their deaths I recall their declarations also. For they would not have suffered ought of a kind they had not previously known they had to suffer. When Agabus, making use of corresponding action too, had foretold that bonds awaited Paul, the disciples, weeping and entreating that he would not venture upon going to Jerusalem, entreated in vain. Acts 21:11 As for him, having a mind to illustrate what he had always taught, he says, Why do you weep, and grieve my heart? But for my part, I could wish not only to suffer bonds, but also to die at Jerusalem, for the name of my Lord Jesus Christ. And so they yielded by saying, Let the will of the Lord be done; feeling sure, doubtless, that sufferings are included in the will of God. For they had tried to keep him back with the intention not of dissuading, but to show love for him; as yearning for (the preservation of) the apostle, not as counselling against martyrdom. And if even then a Prodicus or Valentinus stood by, suggesting that one must not confess on the earth before men, and must do so the less in truth, that God may not (seem to) thirst for blood, and Christ for a repayment of suffering, as though He besought it with the view of obtaining salvation by it for Himself also, he would have immediately heard from the servant of God what the devil had from the Lord: Get behind me, Satan; you are an offense unto me. It is written, You shall worship the Lord your God, and Him only shall you serve. But even now it will be right that he hear it, seeing that, long after, he has poured forth these poisons, which not even thus are to injure readily any of the weak ones, if any one in faith will drink, before being hurt, or even immediately after, this draught of ours.
35. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.25.6, 2.25.8, 3.36.1, 4.22.3, 4.23.1, 4.23.10, 5.20.2, 5.20.4-5.20.8, 5.24.2-5.24.6, 5.24.11-5.24.17, 5.25 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.25.6. It is confirmed likewise by Caius, a member of the Church, who arose under Zephyrinus, bishop of Rome. He, in a published disputation with Proclus, the leader of the Phrygian heresy, speaks as follows concerning the places where the sacred corpses of the aforesaid apostles are laid: 2.25.8. And that they both suffered martyrdom at the same time is stated by Dionysius, bishop of Corinth, in his epistle to the Romans, in the following words: You have thus by such an admonition bound together the planting of Peter and of Paul at Rome and Corinth. For both of them planted and likewise taught us in our Corinth. And they taught together in like manner in Italy, and suffered martyrdom at the same time. I have quoted these things in order that the truth of the history might be still more confirmed. 3.36.1. At that time Polycarp, a disciple of the apostles, was a man of eminence in Asia, having been entrusted with the episcopate of the church of Smyrna by those who had seen and heard the Lord. 4.22.3. And when I had come to Rome I remained there until Anicetus, whose deacon was Eleutherus. And Anicetus was succeeded by Soter, and he by Eleutherus. In every succession, and in every city that is held which is preached by the law and the prophets and the Lord. 4.23.1. And first we must speak of Dionysius, who was appointed bishop of the church in Corinth, and communicated freely of his inspired labors not only to his own people, but also to those in foreign lands, and rendered the greatest service to all in the catholic epistles which he wrote to the churches. 4.23.10. For from the beginning it has been your practice to do good to all the brethren in various ways, and to send contributions to many churches in every city. Thus relieving the want of the needy, and making provision for the brethren in the mines by the gifts which you have sent from the beginning, you Romans keep up the hereditary customs of the Romans, which your blessed bishop Soter has not only maintained, but also added to, furnishing an abundance of supplies to the saints, and encouraging the brethren from abroad with blessed words, as a loving father his children. 5.20.2. At the close of the treatise we have found a most beautiful note which we are constrained to insert in this work. It runs as follows:I adjure you who may copy this book, by our Lord Jesus Christ, and by his glorious advent when he comes to judge the living and the dead, to compare what you shall write, and correct it carefully by this manuscript, and also to write this adjuration, and place it in the copy. 5.20.4. In the letter to Florinus, of which we have spoken, Irenaeus mentions again his intimacy with Polycarp, saying:These doctrines, O Florinus, to speak mildly, are not of sound judgment. These doctrines disagree with the Church, and drive into the greatest impiety those who accept them. These doctrines, not even the heretics outside of the Church, have ever dared to publish. These doctrines, the presbyters who were before us, and who were companions of the apostles, did not deliver to you. 5.20.5. For when I was a boy, I saw you in lower Asia with Polycarp, moving in splendor in the royal court, and endeavoring to gain his approbation. 5.20.6. I remember the events of that time more clearly than those of recent years. For what boys learn, growing with their mind, becomes joined with it; so that I am able to describe the very place in which the blessed Polycarp sat as he discoursed, and his goings out and his comings in, and the manner of his life, and his physical appearance, and his discourses to the people, and the accounts which he gave of his intercourse with John and with the others who had seen the Lord. And as he remembered their words, and what he heard from them concerning the Lord, and concerning his miracles and his teaching, having received them from eyewitnesses of the 'Word of life,' Polycarp related all things in harmony with the Scriptures. 5.20.7. These things being told me by the mercy of God, I listened to them attentively, noting them down, not on paper, but in my heart. And continually, through God's grace, I recall them faithfully. And I am able to bear witness before God that if that blessed and apostolic presbyter had heard any such thing, he would have cried out, and stopped his ears, and as was his custom, would have exclaimed, O good God, unto what times have you spared me that I should endure these things? And he would have fled from the place where, sitting or standing, he had heard such words. 5.20.8. And this can be shown plainly from the letters which he sent, either to the neighboring churches for their confirmation, or to some of the brethren, admonishing and exhorting them. Thus far Irenaeus. 5.24.2. We observe the exact day; neither adding, nor taking away. For in Asia also great lights have fallen asleep, which shall rise again on the day of the Lord's coming, when he shall come with glory from heaven, and shall seek out all the saints. Among these are Philip, one of the twelve apostles, who fell asleep in Hierapolis; and his two aged virgin daughters, and another daughter, who lived in the Holy Spirit and now rests at Ephesus; and, moreover, John, who was both a witness and a teacher, who reclined upon the bosom of the Lord, and, being a priest, wore the sacerdotal plate. 5.24.3. He fell asleep at Ephesus. 5.24.4. And Polycarp in Smyrna, who was a bishop and martyr; and Thraseas, bishop and martyr from Eumenia, who fell asleep in Smyrna. 5.24.5. Why need I mention the bishop and martyr Sagaris who fell asleep in Laodicea, or the blessed Papirius, or Melito, the Eunuch who lived altogether in the Holy Spirit, and who lies in Sardis, awaiting the episcopate from heaven, when he shall rise from the dead? 5.24.6. All these observed the fourteenth day of the passover according to the Gospel, deviating in no respect, but following the rule of faith. And I also, Polycrates, the least of you all, do according to the tradition of my relatives, some of whom I have closely followed. For seven of my relatives were bishops; and I am the eighth. And my relatives always observed the day when the people put away the leaven. 5.24.11. Among them was Irenaeus, who, sending letters in the name of the brethren in Gaul over whom he presided, maintained that the mystery of the resurrection of the Lord should be observed only on the Lord's day. He fittingly admonishes Victor that he should not cut off whole churches of God which observed the tradition of an ancient custom and after many other words he proceeds as follows: 5.24.12. For the controversy is not only concerning the day, but also concerning the very manner of the fast. For some think that they should fast one day, others two, yet others more; some, moreover, count their day as consisting of forty hours day and night. 5.24.13. And this variety in its observance has not originated in our time; but long before in that of our ancestors. It is likely that they did not hold to strict accuracy, and thus formed a custom for their posterity according to their own simplicity and peculiar mode. Yet all of these lived none the less in peace, and we also live in peace with one another; and the disagreement in regard to the fast confirms the agreement in the faith. 5.24.14. He adds to this the following account, which I may properly insert:Among these were the presbyters before Soter, who presided over the church which you now rule. We mean Anicetus, and Pius, and Hyginus, and Telesphorus, and Xystus. They neither observed it themselves, nor did they permit those after them to do so. And yet though not observing it, they were none the less at peace with those who came to them from the parishes in which it was observed; although this observance was more opposed to those who did not observe it. 5.24.15. But none were ever cast out on account of this form; but the presbyters before you who did not observe it, sent the eucharist to those of other parishes who observed it. 5.24.16. And when the blessed Polycarp was at Rome in the time of Anicetus, and they disagreed a little about certain other things, they immediately made peace with one another, not caring to quarrel over this matter. For neither could Anicetus persuade Polycarp not to observe what he had always observed with John the disciple of our Lord, and the other apostles with whom he had associated; neither could Polycarp persuade Anicetus to observe it as he said that he ought to follow the customs of the presbyters that had preceded him. 5.24.17. But though matters were in this shape, they communed together, and Anicetus conceded the administration of the eucharist in the church to Polycarp, manifestly as a mark of respect. And they parted from each other in peace, both those who observed, and those who did not, maintaining the peace of the whole church.
36. Origen, Homilies On Luke, 1 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of peter Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
antichrist, heresiological theme Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 185
antioch Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
apocalyptic literature Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 185
apocrypha Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
apostolic tradition Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 129
aramaic Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
aristotle Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 185
artist, works of art Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
assmann, jan Keith, The Gospel as Manuscript: An Early History of the Jesus Tradition as Material Artifact (2020) 88
barnabas, letter of Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
blasphemy, heresy as Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 185
burial places (memorials) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
christian church, unity of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 194
christian confession, hiding of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
christians, numbers of Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
churches, saint pauls Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
churches, saint peters Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
clement of alexandria Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 194
cyprian Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
demographics, population growth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
dionysios of corinth Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203, 204
dionysius of corinth Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
emperors, constantine Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
episkopos Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
eusebios Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
eusebius (of caesarea) Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
gnosticism, as deceptive Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 181
greek Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
hegesippos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203, 204
hegesippus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
heresy, alterity/otherness/exteriority of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 181, 191
heresy, division/multiplicity of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 185
heresy, exclusion of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 191
heresy, novelty of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 185
hermas Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
humiliores Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
ignatios of antioch Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
ignatius of antioch Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
inscriptions Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
irenaeus, heresiological innovations Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 181, 182, 185
irenaeus Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 179; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203, 204
irenaeus of lyons Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46, 215
jews, jewish Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
jews Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
justin martyr, categorization of Moss, Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions (2012) 185
justin martyr Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
latin, latinisms Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
libertinism/license Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175
luxury Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
lyons Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 129
mani Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 179
mark the magician Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 181
martyrdom of polykarpos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 194
mosaics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
moses Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
names Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
new testament Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 194, 204
origen Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
orthodoxy, antiquity of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 185
orthodoxy, purity of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 182
orthodoxy, unity of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 185
paganism, heresy assimilated to Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 181
paul Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46, 205, 215, 216
peter (apostle), arrest Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
peter (apostle), denial Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
peter (apostle), martyrdom Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
peter (apostle), water miracle Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
polykarpos of smyrna Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
polykrates of ephesos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203, 204
popes (roman), anacletus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 216
popes (roman), anicetus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
popes (roman), linus Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 216
praeconium paschale Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 205
preaching, rule of truth Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 179
primacy Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
recapitulation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 129
roman church Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203, 204
satan, and heresy Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 181
scripture, as contested authority Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 191
sculpture Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
simon of samaria, as source of all heresy Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175
simon of samaria Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 181, 185
statue Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 142
succession, authentic succession Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 175, 181, 182, 185
succession, heretical succession Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 185
tertullian Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 215, 216; Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 179; Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 194, 203, 204
theophilos of caesarea Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203
tradition' Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 129
tropaia Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
valentinians Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 182
vatican hill Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
via appia Dijkstra, The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman (2020) 46
victor, bishop of rome Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 203, 204
vienne and lugdunum, letter from Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 194, 203
διδασκαλεῖον Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 182
παραχαράσσειν Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 181, 182
ἀλήθεια Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 181, 182