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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6793
Irenaeus, Refutation Of All Heresies, 2.15.3


nanThe account which we give of creation is one harmonious with that regular order [of things prevailing in the world], for this scheme of ours is adapted to the things which have [actually] been made; but it is a matter of necessity that they, being unable to assign any reason belonging to the things themselves, with regard to those beings that existed before [creation], and were perfected by themselves, should fall into the greatest perplexity. For, as to the points on which they interrogate us as knowing nothing of creation, they themselves, when questioned in turn respecting the Pleroma, either make mention of mere human feelings, or have recourse to that sort of speech which bears only upon that harmony observable in creation, improperly giving us replies concerning things which are secondary, and not concerning those which, as they maintain, are primary. For we do not question them concerning that harmony which belongs to creation, nor concerning human feelings; but because they must acknowledge, as to their octiform, deciform, and duodeciform Pleroma (the image of which they declare creation to be), that their Father formed it of that figure vainly and thoughtlessly, and must ascribe to Him deformity, if He made anything without a reason. Or, again, if they declare that the Pleroma was so produced in accordance with the foresight of the Father, for the sake of creation, as if He had thus symmetrically arranged its very essence, then it follows that the Pleroma can no longer be regarded as having been formed on its own account, but for the sake of that [creation] which was to be its image as possessing its likeness (just as the clay model is not moulded for its own sake, but for the sake of the statue in brass, or gold, or silver about to be formed), then creation will have greater honour than the Pleroma, if, for its sake, those things [above] were produced.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Clement of Rome, 1 Clement, 20.1-20.3, 20.10-20.11, 21.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20.1. Οἱ οὐρανοὶ τῇ διοικήσει αὐτοῦ σαλευόμενοι ἐν εἰρήνῃ ὑποτάσσονται αὐτῷ. 20.2. ἡμέρα τε καὶ νὺξ τὸν τεταγμένον ὑπ̓ αὐτοῦ δρόμον διανύουσιν, μηδὲν ἀλλήλοις ἐμποδίζοντα. 20.3. ἥλιός τε καὶ σελήνη, ἀστέρων τε χοροὶ κατὰ τὴν διαταγὴν αὐτοῦ ἐν ὁμονοίᾳ δίχα πάσης παρεκβάσεως ἐξελίσσουσιν τοὺς ἐπιτεταγμένους αὐτοῖς ὁρισμούς. 20.10. ἀνέμων σταθμοὶ κατὰ τὸν ἴδιον καιρὸν τὴν λειτουργίαν αὐτῶν ἀπροσκόπως ἐπιτελοῦσιν: ἀέναοί τε πηγαί, πρὸς ἀπόλαυσιν καὶ ὑγείαν δημιουργηθεῖσαι, δίχα ἐλλείψεως παρέχονται τοὺς πρὸς ζωῆς ἀνθρώποις μαζούς: τά τε ἐλάχιστα τῶν ζώων τὰς συνελεύσεις αὐτῶν ἐν ὁμονοίᾳ καὶ εἰρήνῃ ποιοῦνται. 20.11. ταῦτα πάντα ὁ μέγας δημιουργὸς καὶ δεσπότης τῶν ἁπάντων ἐν εἰρήνῃ καὶ ὁμονοίᾳ προσέταξεν εἶναι, εὐεργετῶν τὰ πάντα, ὑπερεκπερισσῶς δὲ ἡμᾶς τοὺς προσπεφευγότας τοῖς οἰκτιρμοῖς αὐτοῦ διὰ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ 21.1. Ὁρᾶτε, ἀγαπητοί, μὴ αἱ εὐεργεσίαι αὐτοῦ αἱ πολλαὶ γένωνται εἰς κρίμα A(C) read kri/ma pa=sin h(mi=n. ἡμῖν, ἐὰν μὴ ἀξίως αὐτοῦ πολιτευόμενοι τὰ καλὰ καὶ εὐάρεστα ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ ποιῶμεν μεθ̓ ὁμονοίας. 20. The heavens, revolving under His government, are subject to Him in peace. Day and night run the course appointed by Him, in no wise hindering each other. The sun and moon, with the companies of the stars, roll on in harmony according to His command, within their prescribed limits, and without any deviation. The fruitful earth, according to His will, brings forth food in abundance, at the proper seasons, for man and beast and all the living beings upon it, never hesitating, nor changing any of the ordices which He has fixed. The unsearchable places of abysses, and the indescribable arrangements of the lower world, are restrained by the same laws. The vast unmeasurable sea, gathered together by His working into various basins, never passes beyond the bounds placed around it, but does as He has commanded. For He said, Thus far shall you come, and your waves shall be broken within you. Job 38:11 The ocean, impassable to man and the worlds beyond it, are regulated by the same enactments of the Lord. The seasons of spring, summer, autumn, and winter, peacefully give place to one another. The winds in their several quarters fulfil, at the proper time, their service without hindrance. The ever-flowing fountains, formed both for enjoyment and health, furnish without fail their breasts for the life of men. The very smallest of living beings meet together in peace and concord. All these the great Creator and Lord of all has appointed to exist in peace and harmony; while He does good to all, but most abundantly to us who have fled for refuge to His compassions through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom be glory and majesty for ever and ever. Amen.
2. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 4.2, 25.2-25.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Clement of Alexandria, Excerpts From Theodotus, 22.1, 22.4-22.5, 35.1, 48.2, 67.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 12.120.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Hermas, Visions, 2.2.6, 2.4.1-2.4.3, 3.9.7-3.9.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 6.34-6.35 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.34. A certain other teacher among them, Marcus, an adept in sorcery, carrying on operations partly by sleight of hand and partly by demons, deceived many from time to time. This (heretic) alleged that there resided in him the mightiest power from invisible and unnameable places. And very often, taking the Cup, as if offering up the Eucharistic prayer, and prolonging to a greater length than usual the word of invocation, he would cause the appearance of a purple, and sometimes of a red mixture, so that his dupes imagined that a certain Grace descended and communicated to the potion a blood-red potency. The knave, however, at that time succeeded in escaping detection from many; but now, being convicted (of the imposture), he will be forced to desist from it. For, infusing secretly into the mixture some drug that possessed the power of imparting such a color (as that alluded to above), uttering for a, considerable time nonsensical expressions, he was in the habit of waiting, (in expectation) that the (drug), obtaining a supply of moisture, might be dissolved, and, being intermingled with the potion, might impart its color to it. The drugs, however, that possess the quality of furnishing this effect we have previously mentioned in the book on magicians. And here we have taken occasion to explain how they make dupes of many, and thoroughly ruin them. And if it should prove agreeable to them to apply their attention with greater accuracy to the statement made by us, they will become aware of the deceit of Marcus. 6.35. And this (Marcus), infusing (the aforesaid) mixture into a smaller cup, was in the habit of delivering it to a woman to offer up the Eucharistic prayer, while he himself stood by, and held (in his hand) another empty (chalice) larger than that. And after his female dupe had pronounced the sentence of Consecration, having received (the cup from her), he proceeded to infuse (its contents) into the larger (chalice), and, pouring them frequently from one cup to the other, was accustomed at the same time to utter the following invocation: Grant that the inconceivable and ineffable Grace which existed prior to the universe, may fill your inner man, and make to abound in you the knowledge of this (grace), as She disseminates the seed of the mustard-tree upon the good soil. And simultaneously pronouncing some such words as these, and astonishing both his female dupe and those that are present, he was regarded as one performing a miracle; while the larger was being filled from the smaller chalice, in such a way as that (the contents), being superabundant, flowed over. And the contrivance of this (juggler) we have likewise explained in the aforesaid (fourth) book, where we have proved that very many drugs, when mingled in this way with liquid substances, are endued with the quality of yielding augmentation, more particularly when diluted in wine. Now, when (one of these impostors) previously smears, in a clandestine manner, an empty cup with any one of these drugs, and shows it (to the spectators) as if it contained nothing, by infusing into it (the contents) from the other cup, and pouring them back again, the drug, as it is of a flatulent nature, is dissolved by being blended with the moist substance. And the effect of this was, that a superabundance of the mixture ensued, and was so far augmented, that what was infused was put in motion, such being the nature of the drug. And if one stow away (the chalice) when it has been filled, (what has been poured into it) will after no long time return to its natural dimensions, inasmuch as the potency of the drug becomes extinct by reason of the continuance of moisture. Wherefore he was in the habit of hurriedly presenting the cup to those present, to drink; but they, horrified at the same time, and eager (to taste the contents of the cup), proceeded to drink (the mixture), as if it were something divine, and devised by the Deity.
7. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.8.3, 1.12-1.13, 1.31.3, 2.2.4, 2.13.10, 3.2.1, 3.16.1, 4.15.1, 4.16.4, 4.35.4, 4.38.3, 4.41.4, 5.9.1, 6.34-6.35 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.12. But Xenophanes, a native of Colophon, was son of Orthomenes. This man survived to the time of Cyrus. This (philosopher) first asserted that there is no possibility of comprehending anything, expressing himself thus:- For if for the most part of perfection man may speak, Yet he knows it not himself, and in all attains surmise. And he affirms that nothing is generated or perishes, or is moved; and that the universe, being one, is beyond change. But he says that the deity is eternal, and one and altogether homogeneous and limited, and of a spherical form, and endued with perception in all parts. And that the sun exists during each day from a conglomeration of small sparks, and that the earth is infinite, and is surrounded neither by an atmosphere nor by the heaven. And that there are infinite suns and moons, and that all things spring from earth. This man affirmed that the sea is salt, on account of the many mixtures that flow into it. Metrodorus, however, from the fact of its being filtered through earth, asserts that it is on account of this that it is made salt. And Xenophanes is of opinion that there had been a mixture of the earth with the sea, and that in process of time it was disengaged from the moisture, alleging that he could produce such proofs as the following: that in the midst of earth, and in mountains, shells are discovered; and also in Syracuse he affirms was found in the quarries the print of a fish and of seals, and in Paros an image of a laurel in the bottom of a stone, and in Melita parts of all sorts of marine animals. And he says that these were generated when all things originally were embedded in mud, and that an impression of them was dried in the mud, but that all men had perished when the earth, being precipitated into the sea, was converted into mud; then, again, that it originated generation, and that this overthrow occurred to all worlds. 1.13. One Ecphantus, a native of Syracuse, affirmed that it is not possible to attain a true knowledge of things. He defines, however, as he thinks, primary bodies to be indivisible, and that there are three variations of these, viz., bulk, figure, capacity, from which are generated the objects of sense. But that there is a determinable multitude of these, and that this is infinite. And that bodies are moved neither by weight nor by impact, but by divine power, which he calls mind and soul; and that of this the world is a representation; wherefore also it has been made in the form of a sphere by divine power. And that the earth in the middle of the cosmical system is moved round its own centre towards the east. 6.34. A certain other teacher among them, Marcus, an adept in sorcery, carrying on operations partly by sleight of hand and partly by demons, deceived many from time to time. This (heretic) alleged that there resided in him the mightiest power from invisible and unnameable places. And very often, taking the Cup, as if offering up the Eucharistic prayer, and prolonging to a greater length than usual the word of invocation, he would cause the appearance of a purple, and sometimes of a red mixture, so that his dupes imagined that a certain Grace descended and communicated to the potion a blood-red potency. The knave, however, at that time succeeded in escaping detection from many; but now, being convicted (of the imposture), he will be forced to desist from it. For, infusing secretly into the mixture some drug that possessed the power of imparting such a color (as that alluded to above), uttering for a, considerable time nonsensical expressions, he was in the habit of waiting, (in expectation) that the (drug), obtaining a supply of moisture, might be dissolved, and, being intermingled with the potion, might impart its color to it. The drugs, however, that possess the quality of furnishing this effect we have previously mentioned in the book on magicians. And here we have taken occasion to explain how they make dupes of many, and thoroughly ruin them. And if it should prove agreeable to them to apply their attention with greater accuracy to the statement made by us, they will become aware of the deceit of Marcus. 6.35. And this (Marcus), infusing (the aforesaid) mixture into a smaller cup, was in the habit of delivering it to a woman to offer up the Eucharistic prayer, while he himself stood by, and held (in his hand) another empty (chalice) larger than that. And after his female dupe had pronounced the sentence of Consecration, having received (the cup from her), he proceeded to infuse (its contents) into the larger (chalice), and, pouring them frequently from one cup to the other, was accustomed at the same time to utter the following invocation: Grant that the inconceivable and ineffable Grace which existed prior to the universe, may fill your inner man, and make to abound in you the knowledge of this (grace), as She disseminates the seed of the mustard-tree upon the good soil. And simultaneously pronouncing some such words as these, and astonishing both his female dupe and those that are present, he was regarded as one performing a miracle; while the larger was being filled from the smaller chalice, in such a way as that (the contents), being superabundant, flowed over. And the contrivance of this (juggler) we have likewise explained in the aforesaid (fourth) book, where we have proved that very many drugs, when mingled in this way with liquid substances, are endued with the quality of yielding augmentation, more particularly when diluted in wine. Now, when (one of these impostors) previously smears, in a clandestine manner, an empty cup with any one of these drugs, and shows it (to the spectators) as if it contained nothing, by infusing into it (the contents) from the other cup, and pouring them back again, the drug, as it is of a flatulent nature, is dissolved by being blended with the moist substance. And the effect of this was, that a superabundance of the mixture ensued, and was so far augmented, that what was infused was put in motion, such being the nature of the drug. And if one stow away (the chalice) when it has been filled, (what has been poured into it) will after no long time return to its natural dimensions, inasmuch as the potency of the drug becomes extinct by reason of the continuance of moisture. Wherefore he was in the habit of hurriedly presenting the cup to those present, to drink; but they, horrified at the same time, and eager (to taste the contents of the cup), proceeded to drink (the mixture), as if it were something divine, and devised by the Deity.
8. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 16-19, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 4.7.7, 4.24, 5.13, 5.16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.7.7. While exposing his mysteries he says that Basilides wrote twenty-four books upon the Gospel, and that he invented prophets for himself named Barcabbas and Barcoph, and others that had no existence, and that he gave them barbarous names in order to amaze those who marvel at such things; that he taught also that the eating of meat offered to idols and the unguarded renunciation of the faith in times of persecution were matters of indifference; and that he enjoined upon his followers, like Pythagoras, a silence of five years.
10. Nag Hammadi, The Testimony of Truth, 30.18-31.5, 30.20, 30.29, 30.30, 45.14, 45.15 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apelles, marcionite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
assimilation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
athenagoras Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
basilides Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 250
care of the poor Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
citizenship, political rights Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
clement of alexandria Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
community Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
corinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
cosmos, cosmology, nature Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
dionysius of corinth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
domitilla, flavia, cf. Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
easter controversy Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
educated, erudite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
exegesis, in gnosticism Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249, 250
exegesis, in irenaeus Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249, 250
exegesis, in valentianianism Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 250
fitness Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
glory of man Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
gnostics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
grapte Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
greek/barbarian division Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
harmonia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
heracleon (gnostic) Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 250
herakleon Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
heresy, alterity/otherness/exteriority of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249
heretics {see also gnostics; marcionites) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
homonoia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
house community Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
image and likeness Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
intellectuals Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
irenaeus, criticism of gnostic myth Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249, 250
irenaeus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
magi, doctrine Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249, 250
marcion Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
marcionites Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
messengers, delegated Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
messengers Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
minister of external affairs Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
musical metaphors Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
myth, associated with heresy Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249, 250
new testament Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 250
orphans Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
parables Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
participation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
platonism Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
provincials, immigrants Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
ptolemy (valentinian, teacher of justin, apol. Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
pythagoreans Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
rhetoric (study) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
rhodon Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
scripture, as contested authority Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249, 250
soter Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
stoic thought Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
stoicism, stoics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
sumphonia Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
tatianos (tatian) Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
teachers Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
theological aesthetic Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
time Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
typology and economy' Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 197
universe, harmony of the Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 234
valentinians, doctrine of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249, 250
valentinians Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249
valentinus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 297
victor Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 401
ἀνατροπή Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249
ἔλεγχος Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 249