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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6775
Ignatius, To The Romans, 2


nanFor I would not have you to be men-pleasers but to please God, as indeed ye do please Him. For neither shall I myself ever find an opportunity such as this to attain unto God, nor can ye, if ye be silent, win the credit of any nobler work. For, if ye be silent and leave me alone, I am a word of God; but if ye desire my flesh, then shall I be again a mere cry. ,[Nay] grant me nothing more than that I be poured out a libation to God, while there is still an altar ready; that forming yourselves into a chorus in love ye may sing to the Father in Jesus Christ, for that God hath vouchsafed that the bishop from Syria should be found in the West, having summoned him from the East. It is good to set from the world unto God, that I may rise unto Him.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Ignatius, To Polycarp, 7.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.1. Seeing that the church which is in Antioch of Syria hath peace, as it hath been reported to me, through your prayers, I myself also have been the more comforted since God hath banished my care; if so be I may through suffering attain unto God, that I may be found a disciple through your intercession. 7.1. They therefore that gainsay the good gift of God perish by their questionings. But it were expedient for them to have love, that they may also rise again.
2. Ignatius, To The Romans, 1.1, 3.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1. Forasmuch as in answer to my prayer to God it hath been granted me to see your godly counteces, so that I have obtained even more than I asked; for wearing bonds in Christ Jesus I hope to salute you, if it be the Divine will that I should be counted worthy to reach unto the end; 3.2. Only pray that I may have power within and without, so that I may not only say it but also desire it; that I may not only be called a Christian, but also be found one. For if I shall be found so, then can I also be called one, and be faithful then, when I am no more visible to the world. 5.2. May I have joy of the beasts that have been prepared for me; and I pray that I may find them prompt; nay I will entice them that they may devour me promptly, not as they have done to some, refusing to touch them through fear. Yea though of themselves they should not be willing while I am ready, I myself will force them to it. 6.2. Bear with me, brethren. Do not hinder me from living; do not desire my death. Bestow not on the world one who desireth to be God's, neither allure him with material things. Suffer me to receive the pure light. When I am come thither, then shall I be a man. 7.2. Let not envy have a home in you. Even though I myself, when I am with you, should beseech you, obey me not; but rather give credence to these things which I write to you. [For] I write to you in the midst of life, yet lusting after death. My lust hath been crucified, and there is no fire of material longing in me, but only water living +and speaking+ in me, saying within me, Come to the Father.
3. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, 14.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.1. 1 So they did not nail him, but bound him, and he put his hands behind him and was bound, as a noble ram out of a great flock, for an oblation, a whole burnt offering made ready and acceptable to God; and he looked up to heaven and said: "O Lord God Almighty, Father of thy beloved and blessed Child, Jesus Christ, through Whom we have received full knowledge of thee, the God of Angels and powers, and of all creation, and of the whole family of the righteous, who live before thee!
4. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.3.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5. Tertullian, Against Praxeas, 1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 20.8, 36.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 5.24.2-5.24.6, 5.24.11-5.24.17 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

5.24.2. We observe the exact day; neither adding, nor taking away. For in Asia also great lights have fallen asleep, which shall rise again on the day of the Lord's coming, when he shall come with glory from heaven, and shall seek out all the saints. Among these are Philip, one of the twelve apostles, who fell asleep in Hierapolis; and his two aged virgin daughters, and another daughter, who lived in the Holy Spirit and now rests at Ephesus; and, moreover, John, who was both a witness and a teacher, who reclined upon the bosom of the Lord, and, being a priest, wore the sacerdotal plate. 5.24.3. He fell asleep at Ephesus. 5.24.4. And Polycarp in Smyrna, who was a bishop and martyr; and Thraseas, bishop and martyr from Eumenia, who fell asleep in Smyrna. 5.24.5. Why need I mention the bishop and martyr Sagaris who fell asleep in Laodicea, or the blessed Papirius, or Melito, the Eunuch who lived altogether in the Holy Spirit, and who lies in Sardis, awaiting the episcopate from heaven, when he shall rise from the dead? 5.24.6. All these observed the fourteenth day of the passover according to the Gospel, deviating in no respect, but following the rule of faith. And I also, Polycrates, the least of you all, do according to the tradition of my relatives, some of whom I have closely followed. For seven of my relatives were bishops; and I am the eighth. And my relatives always observed the day when the people put away the leaven. 5.24.11. Among them was Irenaeus, who, sending letters in the name of the brethren in Gaul over whom he presided, maintained that the mystery of the resurrection of the Lord should be observed only on the Lord's day. He fittingly admonishes Victor that he should not cut off whole churches of God which observed the tradition of an ancient custom and after many other words he proceeds as follows: 5.24.12. For the controversy is not only concerning the day, but also concerning the very manner of the fast. For some think that they should fast one day, others two, yet others more; some, moreover, count their day as consisting of forty hours day and night. 5.24.13. And this variety in its observance has not originated in our time; but long before in that of our ancestors. It is likely that they did not hold to strict accuracy, and thus formed a custom for their posterity according to their own simplicity and peculiar mode. Yet all of these lived none the less in peace, and we also live in peace with one another; and the disagreement in regard to the fast confirms the agreement in the faith. 5.24.14. He adds to this the following account, which I may properly insert:Among these were the presbyters before Soter, who presided over the church which you now rule. We mean Anicetus, and Pius, and Hyginus, and Telesphorus, and Xystus. They neither observed it themselves, nor did they permit those after them to do so. And yet though not observing it, they were none the less at peace with those who came to them from the parishes in which it was observed; although this observance was more opposed to those who did not observe it. 5.24.15. But none were ever cast out on account of this form; but the presbyters before you who did not observe it, sent the eucharist to those of other parishes who observed it. 5.24.16. And when the blessed Polycarp was at Rome in the time of Anicetus, and they disagreed a little about certain other things, they immediately made peace with one another, not caring to quarrel over this matter. For neither could Anicetus persuade Polycarp not to observe what he had always observed with John the disciple of our Lord, and the other apostles with whom he had associated; neither could Polycarp persuade Anicetus to observe it as he said that he ought to follow the customs of the presbyters that had preceded him. 5.24.17. But though matters were in this shape, they communed together, and Anicetus conceded the administration of the eucharist in the church to Polycarp, manifestly as a mark of respect. And they parted from each other in peace, both those who observed, and those who did not, maintaining the peace of the whole church.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antioch Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
authenticity Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
beast Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
bishop Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
commentarii Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
dionysios of corinth Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204
disciple Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
domitian Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
emperor, emperor cult Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
execution Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
hegesippos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204
ignatius of antioch (martyr) Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
irenaeus Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204
love Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
martyrdom, martyr, desire Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
martyrdom, martyr, sacrifice Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
new testament Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204
parthians Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
persecution Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
polycarpe (martyr, martyrdom of) Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
polykrates of ephesos Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204
relics Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
rhetorics, rhetoric Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
roman church Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204
rome Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
sacrifice, sacrificial Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
story Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
tertullian Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204
trajan Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
trial Maier and Waldner, Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time (2022) 165
victor, bishop of rome' Stanton, Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace (2021) 204