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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6773
Ignatius, To The Magnesians, 9


nanIf then those who had walked in ancient practices attained unto newness of hope, no longer observing sabbaths but fashioning their lives after the Lord's day, on which our life also arose through Him and through His death which some men deny -- a mystery whereby we attained unto belief, and for this cause we endure patiently, that we may be found disciples of Jesus Christ our only teacher -- ,if this be so, how shall we be able to live apart from Him? seeing that even the prophets, being His disciples, were expecting Him as their teacher through the Spirit. And for this cause He whom they rightly awaited, when He came, raised them from the dead.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Anon., Didache, 6.1, 8.1-8.2, 11.1-11.2, 11.5-11.6, 11.8-11.10, 12.5, 14.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Whosoever, therefore, comes and teaches you all these things that have been said before, receive him. But if the teacher himself turn and teach another doctrine to the destruction of this, hear him not; but if he teach so as to increase righteousness and the knowledge of the Lord, receive him as the Lord. But concerning the apostles and prophets, according to the decree of the Gospel, thus do. Let every apostle that comes to you be received as the Lord. But he shall not remain except one day; but if there be need, also the next; but if he remain three days, he is a false prophet. And when the apostle goes away, let him take nothing but bread until he lodges; but if he ask money, he is a false prophet. And every prophet that speaks in the Spirit you shall neither try nor judge; for every sin shall be forgiven, but this sin shall not be forgiven. But not every one that speaks in the Spirit is a prophet; but only if he hold the ways of the Lord. Therefore from their ways shall the false prophet and the prophet be known. And every prophet who orders a meal in the Spirit eats not from it, except indeed he be a false prophet; and every prophet who teaches the truth, if he do not what he teaches, is a false prophet. And every prophet, proved true, working unto the mystery of the Church in the world, yet not teaching others to do what he himself does, shall not be judged among you, for with God he has his judgment; for so did also the ancient prophets. But whoever says in the Spirit, Give me money, or something else, you shall not listen to him; but if he says to you to give for others' sake who are in need, let no one judge him.
2. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1, 11.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.1. Abstain from noxious herbs, which are not the husbandry of Jesus Christ, because they are not the planting of the Father. Not that I have found division among you, but filtering. 6.1. But if any one propound Judaism unto you, here him not: for it is better to hear Christianity from a man who is circumcised than Judaism from one uncircumcised. But if either the one or the other speak not concerning Jesus Christ, I look on them as tombstones and graves of the dead, whereon are inscribed only the names of men. 11.2. The love of the brethren which are in Troas saluteth you; from whence also I write to you by the hand of Burrhus, who was sent with me by the Ephesians and Smyrnaeans as a mark of honour. The Lord shall honour them, even Jesus Christ, on whom their hope is set in flesh and soul and spirit, by faith, by love, by concord. Fare ye well in Christ Jesus our common hope.
3. Ignatius, To The Magnesians, 9.1, 11.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.1. If then those who had walked in ancient practices attained unto newness of hope, no longer observing sabbaths but fashioning their lives after the Lord's day, on which our life also arose through Him and through His death which some men deny -- a mystery whereby we attained unto belief, and for this cause we endure patiently, that we may be found disciples of Jesus Christ our only teacher -- 11.1. Now these things I say, my dearly beloved, not because I have learned that any of you are so minded; but as being less than any of you, I would have you be on your guard betimes, that ye fall not into the snares of vain doctrine; but be ye fully persuaded concerning the birth and the passion and the resurrection, which took place in the time of the governorship of Pontius Pilate; for these things were truly and certainly done by Jesus Christ our hope; from which hope may it not befal any of you to be turned aside.
4. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 2.1, 3.1, 6.1, 11.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.1. As children therefore [of the light] of the truth, shun division and wrong doctrines; and where the shepherd is, there follow ye as sheep. 3.1. Abstain from noxious herbs, which are not the husbandry of Jesus Christ, because they are not the planting of the Father. Not that I have found division among you, but filtering. 6.1. But if any one propound Judaism unto you, here him not: for it is better to hear Christianity from a man who is circumcised than Judaism from one uncircumcised. But if either the one or the other speak not concerning Jesus Christ, I look on them as tombstones and graves of the dead, whereon are inscribed only the names of men. 11.2. The love of the brethren which are in Troas saluteth you; from whence also I write to you by the hand of Burrhus, who was sent with me by the Ephesians and Smyrnaeans as a mark of honour. The Lord shall honour them, even Jesus Christ, on whom their hope is set in flesh and soul and spirit, by faith, by love, by concord. Fare ye well in Christ Jesus our common hope.
5. Ignatius, To The Smyrnaeans, 1.1-1.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Ignatius, To The Trallians, 9.1-9.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.1. Be ye deaf therefore, when any man speaketh to you apart from Jesus Christ, who was of the race of David, who was the Son of Mary, who was truly born and ate and drank, was truly persecuted under Pontius Pilate, was truly crucified and died in the sight of those in heaven and those on earth and those under the earth; 9.2. who moreover was truly raised from the dead, His Father having raised Him, who in the like fashion will so raise us also who believe on Him -- His Father, I say, will raise us -- in Christ Jesus, apart from whom we have not true life.
7. New Testament, 2 John, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. New Testament, Apocalypse, 2.15-2.17, 2.19-2.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.15. So you also have some who hold to the teaching of the Nicolaitans in the same way. 2.16. Repent therefore, or else I am coming to you quickly, and I will make war against them with the sword of my mouth. 2.17. He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the assemblies. To him who overcomes, to him I will give of the hidden manna, and I will give him a white stone, and on the stone a new name written, which no one knows but he who receives it. 2.19. I know your works, your love, faith, service, patient endurance, and that your last works are more than the first. 2.20. But I have this against you, that you tolerate your woman, Jezebel, who calls herself a prophetess. She teaches and seduces my servants to commit sexual immorality, and to eat things sacrificed to idols.
9. New Testament, Galatians, 2.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.13. And the rest of the Jews joined him in his hypocrisy; so that evenBarnabas was carried away with their hypocrisy.
10. New Testament, Luke, 10.3-10.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.3. Go your ways. Behold, I send you out as lambs among wolves. 10.4. Carry no purse, nor wallet, nor sandals. Greet no one on the way. 10.5. Into whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace be to this house.' 10.6. If a son of peace is there, your peace will rest on him; but if not, it will return to you. 10.7. Remain in that same house, eating and drinking the things they give, for the laborer is worthy of his wages. Don't go from house to house. 10.8. Into whatever city you enter, and they receive you, eat the things that are set before you. 10.9. Heal the sick who are therein, and tell them, 'The Kingdom of God has come near to you.' 10.10. But into whatever city you enter, and they don't receive you, go out into the streets of it and say 10.11. 'Even the dust from your city that clings to us, we wipe off against you. Nevertheless know this, that the Kingdom of God has come near to you.' 10.12. I tell you, it will be more tolerable in that day for Sodom than for that city.
11. New Testament, Matthew, 10.7-10.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.7. As you go, preach, saying, 'The Kingdom of Heaven is at hand!' 10.8. Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, and cast out demons. Freely you received, so freely give. 10.9. Don't take any gold, nor silver, nor brass in your money belts. 10.10. Take no bag for your journey, neither two coats, nor shoes, nor staff: for the laborer is worthy of his food. 10.11. Into whatever city or village you enter, find out who in it is worthy; and stay there until you go on. 10.12. As you enter into the household, greet it. 10.13. If the household is worthy, let your peace come on it, but if it isn't worthy, let your peace return to you. 10.14. Whoever doesn't receive you, nor hear your words, as you go out out of that house or that city, shake off the dust from your feet. 10.15. Most assuredly I tell you, it will be more tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city. 10.16. Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves. Therefore be wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.
12. Babylonian Talmud, Berachot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

39a. בצר ליה שיעורא,אמר ליה מי סברת כזית גדול בעינן כזית בינוני בעינן (והא איכא) וההוא דאייתו לקמיה דרבי יוחנן זית גדול הוה דאע"ג דשקלוה לגרעינותיה פש ליה שיעורא,דתנן זית שאמרו לא קטן ולא גדול אלא בינוני וזהו אגורי ואמר רבי אבהו לא אגורי שמו אלא אברוטי שמו ואמרי לה סמרוסי שמו ולמה נקרא שמו אגורי ששמנו אגור בתוכו,נימא כתנאי דהנהו תרי תלמידי דהוו יתבי קמיה דבר קפרא הביאו לפניו כרוב ודורמסקין ופרגיות נתן בר קפרא רשות לאחד מהן לברך קפץ וברך על הפרגיות לגלג עליו חבירו כעס בר קפרא אמר לא על המברך אני כועס אלא על המלגלג אני כועס אם חבירך דומה כמי שלא טעם טעם בשר מעולם אתה על מה לגלגת עליו חזר ואמר לא על המלגלג אני כועס אלא על המברך אני כועס ואמר אם חכמה אין כאן זקנה אין כאן,תנא ושניהם לא הוציאו שנתן,מאי לאו בהא קא מיפלגי דמברך סבר שלקות ופרגיות שהכל נהיה בדברו הלכך חביב עדיף ומלגלג סבר שלקות ב"פ האדמה פרגיות שהכל נהיה בדברו הלכך פירא עדיף,לא דכ"ע שלקות ופרגיות שהכל נהיה בדברו והכא בהאי סברא קא מיפלגי מר סבר חביב עדיף ומר סבר כרוב עדיף דזיין,אמר ר' זירא כי הוינן בי רב הונא אמר לן הני גרגלידי דלפתא פרמינהו פרימא רבא בפה"א פרימא זוטא שהכל נהיה בדברו וכי אתאן לבי רב יהודה אמר לן אידי ואידי בפה"א והאי דפרמינהו טפי כי היכי דנמתיק טעמיה,אמר רב אשי כי הוינן בי רב כהנא אמר לן תבשילא דסלקא דלא מפשו בה קמחא בורא פרי האדמה דלפתא דמפשו בה קמחא טפי בורא מיני מזונות והדר אמר אידי ואידי בורא פרי האדמה והאי דשדי בה קמחא טפי לדבוקי בעלמא עבדי לה,אמר רב חסדא תבשיל של תרדין יפה ללב וטוב לעינים וכ"ש לבני מעים אמר אביי והוא דיתיב אבי תפי ועביד תוך תוך,אמר רב פפא פשיטא לי מיא דסלקא כסלקא ומיא דלפתא כלפתא ומיא דכולהו שלקי ככולהו שלקי בעי רב פפא מיא דשיבתא מאי למתוקי טעמא עבדי או לעבורי זוהמא עבדי לה,ת"ש השבת משנתנה טעם בקדירה אין בה משום תרומה ואינה מטמאה טומאת אוכלים שמע מינה למתוקי טעמא עבדי לה שמע מינה,אמר רב חייא בר אשי פת צנומה בקערה מברכין עליה המוציא ופליגא דר' חייא דאמר ר' חייא צריך שתכלה ברכה עם הפת,מתקיף לה רבא מאי שנא צנומה דלא משום דכי כליא ברכה אפרוסה קא כליא על הפת נמי כי קא גמרה אפרוסה גמרה 39a. bit lacks therequisite bmeasure?The smallest quantity of food that is considered eating is the size of an olive-bulk, and an olive with its pit removed is smaller than that., bHe said to him: Do you hold that we require a large oliveas the measure of food necessary in order to recite a blessing after eating? bWe require a medium-sized olive and thatolive bwasthat size, as the olive bthat they brought before Rabbi Yoḥa was a large olive. Even though they removed its pit, therequisite bmeasure remained. /b,The Gemara cites a proof that the halakhic measure of an olive is not based on a large olive bas we learnedin a mishna: bThe olive of whichthe Sages bspokewith regard to the halakhic measures is bneither small nor large, but medium, and thatolive biscalled iaguri /i. And Rabbi Abbahu said: The nameof that genus of olives bis not iaguri /i, but its name is iavruti /i, and some saythat bits name is isamrusi /i. And why,then, bis it called iaguri /i? Because its oil is accumulated [ iagur /i] inside it. /b,With regard to the appropriate blessing over boiled vegetables: bLet us saythat this dispute bis parallelto a dispute between the itanna’im /i,as the Gemara relates: bTwo students were sitting before bar Kappara whencooked bcabbage,cooked Damascene bplums and pullets were set before him. Bar Kappara gave one ofthe students bpermission to recite a blessing. He hurried and recited a blessing over the pulletsand bhis counterpart ridiculed himfor gluttonously reciting the blessing that should have been recited later, first. bBar Kappara became angrywith both of them, bhe said: I am not angry with the one who recited the blessing, but at the one who ridiculedhim. bIf your counterpart is like one who never tasted the flavor of meatand was therefore partial to the pullet, and hurriedly ate it, bwhy did you ridicule him?Bar Kappara bcontinued and saidto the second student: bI am not upset at the one who ridiculedhim, bratherit is bwith the one who recited the blessing that I am angry. And he said: If there is no wisdom here, is there no elder here?If you are uncertain which blessing to recite first, couldn’t you have asked me, as I am an elder?,The Gemara concludes that bit was taught: And both of them did notlive bout his year.Due to bar Kappara’s anger they were punished, and both died within the year.,The Gemara attempts to infer from this story to the topic at hand: bWhat? Is it not that they disagreed with regard to the following?The bone who recited the blessingover the pullet first bheldthat the blessing to be recited over both bboiled vegetables and pulletis: bBy whose word all things came to be, and, therefore,that which bhe preferstakes bprecedenceand is eaten first. The bone who ridiculedhim bheldthat over bboiled vegetablesone recites: bWho creates fruit of the ground,and over bpulletone recites: bBy whose word all things came to be, and, therefore, the fruittakes bprecedence,as its blessing is more specific and therefore more significant.,The Gemara rejects this explanation: bNo, everyone agreesthat over bboiled vegetables and pulletone recites: bBy whose word all things came to be, and here they argue over this:This bSage,who recited the blessing, bheld thatthe food which is bpreferred takes precedenceand one recites a blessing over it first, band the Sagewho ridiculed him bheld: Cabbage takes precedence, as it nourishes. /b, bRabbi Zeira said: When we were in the study hall of Rav Huna he said to us: These turnip heads,if bone cut theminto blargeslices, he recites over them: bWho creates fruit of the ground,because in doing so he has not significantly changed them. If he bcut theminto bsmallpieces, he recites over them: bBy whose word all things came to be. And when we came to the study hall of Rav Yehuda he said to us:Over both bthese,large slices, band those,small pieces, one recites: bWho creates fruit of the ground, and the fact that he cut them extensively was in order to sweeten its flavor. /b,On a similar note, bRav Ashi said: When we were in the study hall of Rav Kahana, he said to us:Over ba cooked dish of beets to which they,typically, bdo not adda bsignificantamount of bflour,one recites: bWho creates fruit of the ground.Over ba cooked dish of turnips to which they,typically, badda bmore significantamount of bflour,one recites: bWho creates the various types of nourishment. AndRav Kahana breconsideredhis previous statement and said: Over both bthese,beets, band those,turnips, one recites: bWho creates fruit of the ground, and the fact that they threw extra flour inwith the turnips, bthey did so merelyso the components of the cooked dish would bstick together.The primary ingredient in the dish remains the turnips, not the flour.,Tangential to this mention of a turnip dish, bRav Ḥisdaadded, band said: A cooked dish of beets is beneficial for the heart, good for the eyes and all the more so, for the intestines. Abaye said: That isspecifically when the dish bsits on the stove and makes a itukh tukh /isound, i.e., it boils., bRav Pappa said: It is clear to methat bbeet water,water in which beets were boiled, bhasthe same status bas beets, and turnip water hasthe same status bturnips, and the waterin which ball boiled vegetableswere boiled bhasthe same status bas all boiled vegetables.However, bRav Pappa raised a dilemma: Whatis the status of bwaterin which bdillwas boiled? bDo they usedill bto sweeten the taste, or do they use it to removeresidual bfilth?If the dill was added to flavor the food then the water in which it was boiled should be treated like water in which any other vegetable was boiled. However, if the dill was added merely to absorb the residue of the soup, then there was never any intention to flavor the dish and one should not recite a blessing over it., bCome and heara resolution to this dilemma from what we learned in a mishna in the tractate iOkatzin /i: bDill, once it hasalready bgivenits bflavor in the pot,no longer has any value and bis nolonger bsubject tothe ihalakhotof iterumaandsince it is no longer considered food, bit can nolonger become impure with bthe ritual impurity of food. Learn from thisthat bthey useddill bto sweeten the taste.The Gemara concludes: Indeed, blearn from this. /b, bRav Ḥiyya bar Ashi said: Over dry breadthat was placed bin a bowlto soak, bone recites: Who brings forthbread from the earth, even if there is another loaf of bread before him, as it is considered bread in every respect. This ihalakha bdisagrees withthe opinion of bRabbi Ḥiyya, as Rabbi Ḥiyya said: The blessing must conclude withthe beginning of the breaking of btheloaf of bbread.The dried bread had already been sliced and separated from the loaf., bRava strongly objects to thisassumption: bWhat is different about dried bread, thatone does bnotrecite: Who brings forth bread from the earth, over it, bbecause when the blessing concludes, it concludes on a slice?In a case where he recites a blessing bona loaf of bbread as well, when he completesthe blessing, bhe completes it on a slice,as one cuts the bread before the blessing.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adversus ioudaios writings Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 95
akedah Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
antithetical Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
atonement Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
celebration Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
clement of alexandria Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 95
creation Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
cyprian Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 95
didache Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 26
docetists Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 182
eighth day Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
grace Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
hope Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
ignatius, opponents Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 182
isaac Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
jesus, resurrection of Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 182
jesus, vicarious death of Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
jewish christianity Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 26
jews, jewish communities, scriptures Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 182
lamb Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
law Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
magnesia Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 182
marcionites Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
noët of smyrna Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
passover Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
paul, andvicarious death Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
philadelphia Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 182
prophets Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
rabbi (, teachings Falcetta, Early Christian Teachers: The 'Didaskaloi' From Their Origins to the Middle of the Second Century (2020) 182
rome Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
sabbath Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
scapegoat Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
sun-christology Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
sun Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
sunday Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
temple Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
tertullian Neusner Green and Avery-Peck, Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points (2022) 95
torah Vinzent, Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament (2013) 213
vicarious death in iv maccabees; in paul' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
vicarious death in iv maccabees Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 212
yehudah ha-nasi, rabbi Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 42
χριστέμπορος Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 26
– pun Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 42