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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6757
Iamblichus, Life Of Pythagoras, 111
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

347d. uch is their lack of education—put a premium on flute-girls by hiring the extraneous voice of the flute at a high price, and carry on their intercourse by means of its utterance. But where the party consists of thorough gentlemen who have had a proper education, you will see neither flute-girls nor dancing-girls nor harp-girls, but only the company contenting themselves with their own conversation, and none of these fooleries and frolics—each speaking and listening decently in his turn
2. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.27.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.27.6. At Thespiae is also a sanctuary of Heracles. The priestess there is a virgin, who acts as such until she dies. The reason of this is said to be as follows. Heracles, they say, had intercourse with the fifty daughters of Thestius, except one, in a single night. She was the only one who refused to have connection with him. Heracles,thinking that he had been insulted, condemned her to remain a virgin all her life, serving him as his priest.
3. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.21, 8.43 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.21. The same authority, as we have seen, asserts that Pythagoras took his doctrines from the Delphic priestess Themistoclea. Hieronymus, however, says that, when he had descended into Hades, he saw the soul of Hesiod bound fast to a brazen pillar and gibbering, and the soul of Homer hung on a tree with serpents writhing about it, this being their punishment for what they had said about the gods; he also saw under torture those who would not remain faithful to their wives. This, says our authority, is why he was honoured by the people of Croton. Aristippus of Cyrene affirms in his work On the Physicists that he was named Pythagoras because he uttered the truth as infallibly as did the Pythian oracle. 8.43. They also had a son Telauges, who succeeded his father and, according to some, was Empedocles' instructor. At all events Hippobotus makes Empedocles say:Telauges, famedSon of Theano and Pythagoras.Telauges wrote nothing, so far as we know, but his mother Theano wrote a few things. Further, a story is told that being asked how many days it was before a woman becomes pure after intercourse, she replied, With her own husband at once, with another man never. And she advised a woman going in to her own husband to put off her shame with her clothes, and on leaving him to put it on again along with them. Asked Put on what? she replied, What makes me to be called a woman.
4. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 110, 132, 97-98, 100 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aglaophamus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
aristoxenus, on the pythagorean way of life Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46
brisson, l. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
chaeremon the stoic, on the egyptian priests Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 321
diels and kranz Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46
heraclitus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
hesiod Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
homer Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
huffman, c.a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
iamblichus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
mewaldt, j. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46
mutilation, sexual Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 168
orpheus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
philodemus Burton, Dionysus and Rome: Religion and Literature (2009) 138
plato Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
purification Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46
pythagoras Burton, Dionysus and Rome: Religion and Literature (2009) 138; Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 159
pythagoreanism Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 168
pythagoreans, structure of daily activities Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46
singing' Burton, Dionysus and Rome: Religion and Literature (2009) 138
timpanaro cardini, m. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46
virginity, of religious cults Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 168