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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6757
Iamblichus, Life Of Pythagoras, 100
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

824a. no very gentlemanly pursuit! Thus there is left for our athletes only the hunting and capture of land-animals. of this branch of hunting, the kind called night-stalking, which is the job of lazy men who sleep in turn, is one that deserves no praise; nor does that kind deserve praise in which there are intervals of rest from toil, when men master the wild force of beasts by nets and traps instead of doing so by the victorious might of a toil-loving soul. Accordingly, the only kind left for all, and the best kind, is the hunting of quadrupeds with horses and dogs and the hunter’s own limbs, when men hunt in person, and subdue all the creatures by means of their own running, striking and shooting—all the men, that is to say, who cultivate the courage that is divine. Concerning the whole of this subject, the exposition we have now given will serve as the praise and blame; and the law will run thus,— None shall hinder these truly sacred hunters from hunting wheresoever and howsoever they wish; but the night-trapper who trusts to nets and snares no one shall ever allow to hunt anywhere. The fowler no man shall hinder on fallow land or mountain; but he that finds him on tilled fields or on sacred glebes shall drive him off. The fisherman shall be allowed to hunt in all waters except havens and sacred rivers and pools and lakes, but only on condition that he makes no use of muddying juices. So now, at last, we may say that all our laws about education are complete. Clin. You may rightly say so.
2. Ovid, Fasti, 1.349-1.360 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.349. Ceres was first to delight in the blood of the greedy sow 1.350. Her crops avenged by the rightful death of the guilty creature 1.351. She learned that in spring the grain, milky with sweet juice 1.352. Had been uprooted by the snouts of bristling pigs. 1.353. The swine were punished: terrified by that example 1.354. You should have spared the vine-shoots, he-goat. 1.355. Watching a goat nibbling a vine someone once 1.356. Vented their indignation in these words: 1.357. ‘Gnaw the vine, goat! But when you stand at the altar 1.358. There’ll be something from it to sprinkle on your horns.’ 1.359. Truth followed: Bacchus, your enemy is given you 1.360. To punish, and sprinkled wine flows over its horns.
3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.108-15.110, 15.115 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.20, 8.22-8.24, 8.34, 8.86 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.20. He was never known to over-eat, to behave loosely, or to be drunk. He would avoid laughter and all pandering to tastes such as insulting jests and vulgar tales. He would punish neither slave nor free man in anger. Admonition he used to call setting right. He used to practise divination by sounds or voices and by auguries, never by burnt-offerings, beyond frankincense. The offerings he made were always iimate; though some say that he would offer cocks, sucking goats and porkers, as they are called, but lambs never. However, Aristoxenus has it that he consented to the eating of all other animals, and only abstained from ploughing oxen and rams. 8.22. He is said to have advised his disciples as follows: Always to say on entering their own doors:Where did I trespass? What did I achieve?And unfulfilled what duties did I leave?Not to let victims be brought for sacrifice to the gods, and to worship only at the altar unstained with blood. Not to call the gods to witness, man's duty being rather to strive to make his own word carry conviction. To honour their elders, on the principle that precedence in time gives a greater title to respect; for as in the world sunrise comes before sunset, so in human life the beginning before the end, and in all organic life birth precedes death. 8.23. And he further bade them to honour gods before demi-gods, heroes before men, and first among men their parents; and so to behave one to another as not to make friends into enemies, but to turn enemies into friends. To deem nothing their own. To support the law, to wage war on lawlessness. Never to kill or injure trees that are not wild, nor even any animal that does not injure man. That it is seemly and advisable neither to give way to unbridled laughter nor to wear sullen looks. To avoid excess of flesh, on a journey to let exertion and slackening alternate, to train the memory, in wrath to restrain hand and tongue 8.24. to respect all divination, to sing to the lyre and by hymns to show due gratitude to gods and to good men. To abstain from beans because they are flatulent and partake most of the breath of life; and besides, it is better for the stomach if they are not taken, and this again will make our dreams in sleep smooth and untroubled.Alexander in his Successions of Philosophers says that he found in the Pythagorean memoirs the following tenets as well. 8.34. According to Aristotle in his work On the Pythagoreans, Pythagoras counselled abstinence from beans either because they are like the genitals, or because they are like the gates of Hades . . . as being alone unjointed, or because they are injurious, or because they are like the form of the universe, or because they belong to oligarchy, since they are used in election by lot. He bade his disciples not to pick up fallen crumbs, either in order to accustom them not to eat immoderately, or because connected with a person's death; nay, even, according to Aristophanes, crumbs belong to the heroes, for in his Heroes he says:Nor taste ye of what falls beneath the board !Another of his precepts was not to eat white cocks, as being sacred to the Month and wearing suppliant garb – now supplication ranked with things good – sacred to the Month because they announce the time of day; and again white represents the nature of the good, black the nature of evil. Not to touch such fish as were sacred; for it is not right that gods and men should be allotted the same things, any more than free men and slaves. 8.86. 8. EUDOXUSEudoxus of Cnidos, the son of Aeschines, was an astronomer, a geometer, a physician and a legislator. He learned geometry from Archytas and medicine from Philistion the Sicilian, as Callimachus tells us in his Tables. Sotion in his Successions of Philosophers says that he was also a pupil of Plato. When he was about twenty-three years old and in straitened circumstances, he was attracted by the reputation of the Socratics and set sail for Athens with Theomedon the physician, who provided for his wants. Some even say that he was Theomedon's favourite. Having disembarked at Piraeus he went up every day to Athens and, when he had attended the Sophists' lectures, returned again to the port.
5. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 183, 83, 97-98, 111 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

6. Iamblichus, Protrepticus, 21 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

7. Porphyry, Life of Pythagoras, 34, 38-41, 32 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

32. Diogenes, setting forth his daily routine of living, relates that he advised all men to avoid ambition and vain-glory, which chiefly excite envy, and to shun the presences of crowds. He himself held morning conferences at his residence, composing his soul with the music of the lute, and singing certain old paeans of Thales. He also sang verses of Homer and Hesiod, which seemed to soothe the mind. He danced certain dances which he conceived conferred on the body agility and health. Walks he took not promiscuously, but only in company of one or two companions, in temples or sacred groves, selecting the quietest and pleasantest places. SPAN


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acusmata Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 574, 585
aelian (claudius aelianus) Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 273
anger Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
animals Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 573
antonius diogenes Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 571
apuleius Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 273
aristoxenus, and the catalogue of pythagoreans Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41
aristoxenus, life of archytas Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41
aristoxenus, life of pythagoras Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41
aristoxenus, on pythagoras and his associates Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41
aristoxenus, on the pythagorean way of life Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41, 46, 47, 48, 49
beans Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
boyancé, p. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 567, 568, 569
brisson, l. and segonds, a. p. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 571
crowds Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 571
daimones Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
diels and kranz Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46, 49
diet Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 569
dillon, j. and hershbell, j. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 565
diogenes laertius Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
dyad Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
eudoxus Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 574
euphemia, and xenophanes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
euphemos mythos Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
euphron, euphrosyne Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
gods Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 47, 56
heroes Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
honey Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 47, 567
hunting Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 571, 573, 574, 575
hymn Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
iamblichus, use of singulars and plurals in the vp Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 565
justice, object of prayer Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
katharos logos Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
law Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
learning Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 580
meat Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 568, 574
memory, review of the previous day Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 585
memory Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 580, 585
metempsychosis, and pythagoras Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
mewaldt, j. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46, 49, 56
monad Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
nicomachus Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41
ovid Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 569
parents Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
philolaus Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41
philosophers on objects of prayer, in pythagoras Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
philosophers on objects of prayer, in xenophanes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
pigs Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 568, 569
plato, on hunting Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 573
porphyry Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56, 574; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
precepts, in the pythagorean tradition Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 56
purification Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46
pythagoras Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 568; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
pythagorean precepts, general in nature Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 571
pythagorean precepts, no mention of individual pythagoreans Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 49
pythagoreans, structure of daily activities Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46, 48, 585
rohde, e. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 565, 566, 567, 571
sacrifice Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 47, 567
soul' Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 573
soul Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 575
staab, g. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 565, 567
symbola, pythagorean Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
symposium, in xenophanes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
timpanaro cardini, m. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 46, 47, 48, 49
xenophanes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 113
xenophon Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 573
zhmud, l. Huffman, A History of Pythagoreanism (2019) 41