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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6737
Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 7.14


nanwhom he called to him by their names, and commended them before the company, and rejoiced in them in the same manner as a man would have rejoiced in his own exploits. He also put on their heads crowns of gold, and golden ornaments about their necks, and gave them long spears of gold, and ensigns that were made of silver


nanfor many of them were so made, that they were on three or even four stories, one above another. The magnificence also of their structure afforded one both pleasure and surprise;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 8.266-8.366 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 7.11, 7.13, 7.15 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7.11. yet, he said, that he would immediately bestow rewards and dignities on those that had fought the most bravely, and with greater force, and had signalized their conduct in the most glorious manner, and had made his army more famous by their noble exploits; and that no one who had been willing to take more pains than another should miss of a just retribution for the same; 7.11. Whereupon the people of Antioch, when they had failed of success in this their first request, made him a second; for they desired that he would order those tables of brass to be removed on which the Jews’ privileges were engraven. 7.13. 3. Hereupon Titus ordered those whose business it was to read the list of all that had performed great exploits in this war 7.13. Then did he retire to that gate which was called the Gate of the Pomp, because pompous shows do always go through that gate; 7.15. and removed every one of them to a higher rank; and besides this, he plentifully distributed among them, out of the spoils, and the other prey they had taken, silver, and gold, and garments. 7.15. and the last of all the spoils, was carried the Law of the Jews.
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 1018-1023, 13-19, 212, 220, 247, 437-440, 449, 453, 455-460, 464-490, 614-622, 769, 894, 1017 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1017. Appear as a bull or many-headed serpent or raging lion to see.
4. Sophocles, Ajax, 52-54, 51 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Antoninus Liberalis, Collection of Metamorphoses, 10.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.7.5-2.7.6, 10.4.2-10.4.3, 10.15.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.7.5. On the modern citadel is a sanctuary of Fortune of the Height, and after it one of the Dioscuri. Their images and that of Fortune are of wood. On the stage of the theater built under the citadel is a statue of a man with a shield, who they say is Aratus, the son of Cleinias. After the theater is a temple of Dionysus. The god is of gold and ivory, and by his side are Bacchanals of white marble. These women they say are sacred to Dionysus and maddened by his inspiration. The Sicyonians have also some images which are kept secret. These one night in each year they carry to the temple of Dionysus from what they call the Cosmeterium (Tiring-room), and they do so with lighted torches and native hymns. 2.7.6. The first is the one named Baccheus, set up by Androdamas, the son of Phlias, and this is followed by the one called Lysius (Deliverer), brought from Thebes by the Theban Phanes at the command of the Pythian priestess. Phanes came to Sicyon when Aristomachus, the son of Cleodaeus, failed to understand the oracle I To wait for “the third fruit,” i.e. the third generation. It was interpreted to mean the third year. given him, and therefore failed to return to the Peloponnesus . As you walk from the temple of Dionysus to the market-place you see on the right a temple of Artemis of the lake. A look shows that the roof has fallen in, but the inhabitants cannot tell whether the image has been removed or how it was destroyed on the spot. 10.4.2. A survey of the ancient circuit of Panopeus led me to guess it to be about seven stades. I was reminded of Homer's verses about Tityos, See Hom. Od. 11.581 where he mentions the city of Panopeus with its beautiful dancing-floors, and how in the fight over the body of Patroclus he says that Schedius, son of Iphitus and king of the Phocians, who was killed by Hector, lived in Panopeus. See Hom. Il. 17.307 foll. It seemed to me that the reason why the king lived here was fear of the Boeotians; at this point is the easiest pass from Boeotia into Phocis, so the king used Panopeus as a fortified post. 10.4.3. The former passage, in which Homer speaks of the beautiful dancing-floors of Panopeus, I could not understand until I was taught by the women whom the Athenians call Thyiads. The Thyiads are Attic women, who with the Delphian women go to Parnassus every other year and celebrate orgies in honor of Dionysus. It is the custom for these Thyiads to hold dances at places, including Panopeus, along the road from Athens . The epithet Homer applies to Panopeus is thought to refer to the dance of the Thyiads. 10.15.3. Then verily, having crossed the narrow strait of the Hellespont, The devastating host of the Gauls shall pipe; and lawlessly They shall ravage Asia ; and much worse shall God do To those who dwell by the shores of the sea For a short while. For right soon the son of Cronos Shall raise them a helper, the dear son of a bull reared by Zeus, Who on all the Gauls shall bring a day of destruction. By the son of a bull she meant Attalus, king of Pergamus, who was also styled bull-horned by an oracle.
7. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 40.44-40.45, 40.49, 40.56 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ajax Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
aphrodite Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
ares Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
argos, argive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
bellerophon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
bonds Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
boukolos βουκόλος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
cattle Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
dionysos, dionysos as bull Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos axie taure Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos bougenes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos boukeros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos boukolos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos gynaimanes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
dionysos, dionysos taurometopos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos tauropos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos tauros diotrefes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos, integration Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
dionysos, lysios Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247, 320, 333; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
dolphin Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
elis, sixteen/ women from Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
elis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
epic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
fertility Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
fettering Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
fetters Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
hephaestus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
hephaistos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
hera, angry Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
hera, basileia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
hera, eleutheria Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
hera, enthroned Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
hera, fettered Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
heracles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
hermes Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
homeric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
homeric hymn to dionysos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
integration Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
leopard Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
lion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
lycurgus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
lysander the lacedaemonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
male Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320, 333
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
multiplicity Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247, 320
odysseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
olympian family Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
olympus, olympian, god Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
oracle, oracular Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
otherworld Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
pantheon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
paris alexander Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247, 320, 333
persuasion Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
serpents Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
sovereignty Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
theology, theological Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
throne Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
trieteric festivals Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247
violence/violent Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247, 320
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 274
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247, 333
worship' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 333
zagreus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 247