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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6722
Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 4
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 7.197 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.197. When Xerxes had come to Alus in Achaea, his guides, desiring to inform him of all they knew, told him the story which is related in that country concerning the worship of Laphystian Zeus, namely how Athamas son of Aeolus plotted Phrixus' death with Ino, and further, how the Achaeans by an oracle's bidding compel Phrixus descendants to certain tasks. ,They order the eldest of that family not to enter their town-hall (which the Achaeans call the People's House) and themselves keep watch there. If he should enter, he may not come out, save only to be sacrificed. They say as well that many of those who were to be sacrificed had fled in fear to another country, and that if they returned at a later day and were taken, they were brought into the town-hall. The guides showed Xerxes how the man is sacrificed, namely with fillets covering him all over and a procession to lead him forth. ,It is the descendants of Phrixus' son Cytissorus who are treated in this way, because when the Achaeans by an oracle's bidding made Athamas son of Aeolus a scapegoat for their country and were about to sacrifice him, this Cytissorus came from Aea in Colchis and delivered him, thereby bringing the god's wrath on his own descendants. ,Hearing all this, Xerxes, when he came to the temple grove, refrained from entering it himself and bade all his army do likewise, holding the house and the precinct of Athamas' descendants alike in reverence.
2. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.1-4.415, 15.311 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Strabo, Geography, 7.7.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.7.1. EpirusThese alone, then, of all the tribes that are marked off by the Ister and by the Illyrian and Thracian mountains, deserve to be mentioned, occupying as they do the whole of the Adriatic seaboard beginning at the recess, and also the sea-board that is called the left parts of the Pontus, and extends from the Ister River as far as Byzantium. But there remain to be described the southerly parts of the aforesaid mountainous country and next thereafter the districts that are situated below them, among which are both Greece and the adjacent barbarian country as far as the mountains. Now Hecataeus of Miletus says of the Peloponnesus that before the time of the Greeks it was inhabited by barbarians. Yet one might say that in the ancient times the whole of Greece was a settlement of barbarians, if one reasons from the traditions themselves: Pelops brought over peoples from Phrygia to the Peloponnesus that received its name from him; and Danaus from Egypt; whereas the Dryopes, the Caucones, the Pelasgi, the Leleges, and other such peoples, apportioned among themselves the parts that are inside the isthmus — and also the parts outside, for Attica was once held by the Thracians who came with Eumolpus, Daulis in Phocis by Tereus, Cadmeia by the Phoenicians who came with Cadmus, and Boeotia itself by the Aones and Temmices and Hyantes. According to Pindar, there was a time when the Boeotian tribe was called Syes. Moreover, the barbarian origin of some is indicated by their names — Cecrops, Godrus, Aiclus, Cothus, Drymas, and Crinacus. And even to the present day the Thracians, Illyrians, and Epeirotes live on the flanks of the Greeks (though this was still more the case formerly than now); indeed most of the country that at the present time is indisputably Greece is held by the barbarians — Macedonia and certain parts of Thessaly by the Thracians, and the parts above Acaria and Aitolia by the Thesproti, the Cassopaei, the Amphilochi, the Molossi, and the Athamanes — Epeirotic tribes.
5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.1.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.1.2. Corinth is no longer inhabited by any of the old Corinthians, but by colonists sent out by the Romans. This change is due to the Achaean League. A league of states in the northern Peloponnesus . It was most influential in the second half of the third century B.C. Founded 280 B.C. The Corinthians, being members of it, joined in the war against the Romans, which Critolaus, when appointed general of the Achaeans, brought about by persuading to revolt both the Achaeans and the majority of the Greeks outside the Peloponnesus . When the Romans won the war, they carried out a general disarmament of the Greeks 146 B.C. and dismantled the walls of such cities as were fortified. Corinth was laid waste by Mummius, who at that time commanded the Romans in the field, and it is said that it was afterwards refounded by Caesar, 44 B.C. who was the author of the present constitution of Rome . Carthage, too, they say, was refounded in his reign.
6. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.71-12.75 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agave Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
agones,isthmian Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
akraiphia Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
apollo pto(i)os,ptoieus Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
arion Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
athamania,ambiguity of location Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
athamantine plain Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
athamas Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342; Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123; Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
boutsikas,efrosyni Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
cannibalism Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
complicated past,interlocking traditions Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
corinth Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
cult centres,local and regional Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
dionysos,and heroines Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
dionysos,and ino Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
dionysos Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164; Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
diurnal rituals Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
editorial layout Pamias (2017), Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads, 179
eitrem,s. Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
euripides,innovation Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
frazer.j. g. Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
galen Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
harpalyce Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
hera Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
heroines,and dionysos Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
historians Pamias (2017), Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads, 165
identity,general,ethnic Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
infanticide myths Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
ino-leukothea,and immortality Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
ino-leukothea,dionysos and Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
ino Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
koinon (federation,league),epeirotic Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
lamps/torches Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
learchos Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
learchus Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
leukon,son of athamas Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
maternity,ambivalence toward Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
melikertes/palaimon Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
melikertes Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
memories,religious,intertwined with current practice Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
migrations,myths of,boiotia Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
migrations,myths of,fostered in ritual practice Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
migrations,myths of,interlocking network of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
minyas,daughters of Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
mobility,of populations Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
myth,innovative treatment of Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
nephele Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
nereids Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
network,of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web,grid,framework),several interlocking (central greece) Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
nightingale,myth of,in sophocles tereus Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
nocturnal rituals Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
ovid Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
pelasgians,traditions interlocking with central greeks Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
pentheus Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
poseidon Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
procne,myth of,,in sophocles tereus Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
procne,myth of,,ovid on Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
pto(i)os,hero Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
readership Pamias (2017), Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads, 165
region,myth and formation of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
sea,as means of escape or punishment Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
senses,sisyphos Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
sophocles,innovations in myth Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
sophocles,tereus Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
sources of the bibliotheca Pamias (2017), Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads, 165
stepmothers Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123
themisto Lyons (1997), Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult, 123; Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
theoria,as myth-ritual network Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
theoria,patterns reworked over time (delos) Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
thessalians,migrations of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
thessalians Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
thessalo-boiotian tradition Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
to dodona' Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342
tragedy,infanticide myths Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
tragedy Pamias (2017), Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads, 179
treatment of myth Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 121
zeus at nemea Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 164
zeus dodonaios,at dodona Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 342