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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 2.7.75
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, Paradoxa Stoicorum, 37, 33 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.79 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.79. Ubi sunt ergo isti, qui iracundiam utilem dicunt —potest utilis esse insania?—aut naturalem? an an s hanc X quicquam est secundum est sec. s es sec. R esse sec. GKV naturam, quod fit repugte ratione? quo modo autem, si naturalis esset ira, ira add. G 2 aut alius alio magis iracundus esset, aut finem haberet prius quam esset aut finem ... 4 esset add. V 3 ulta, ulta Man. ulla ulciscendi lubido, aut quemquam paeniteret, quod fecisset fecisse V 1 per iram? ut Alexandrum regem videmus, qui cum interemisset Clitum clitum iditum K familiarem suum, vix a se manus abstinuit; tanta vis fuit paenitendi. quibus cognitis quis est qui dubitet dubitat K quin hic quoque motus animi sit totus opinabilis ac voluntarius? Quis enim dubitarit quin aegrotationes animi, qualis est avaritia, gloriae cupiditas, ex eo, quod magni magna V aestumetur ea res ex qua animus aegrotat, oriantur? oriantur s oriatur unde intellegi debet perturbationem quoque omnem esse in opinione.
3. Philodemus of Gadara, De Ira \ , 20-25, 19 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Sermones, 1.2.38, 1.2.43, 1.2.59, 1.2.61, 1.2.119, 1.2.127-1.2.128, 1.2.130-1.2.131, 1.2.133, 1.3.78, 1.3.96, 1.4.111-1.4.115, 2.7.1, 2.7.22, 2.7.42, 2.7.63-2.7.65, 2.7.72-2.7.73, 2.7.83 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 5.31, 7.121 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.31. He held that the virtues are not mutually interdependent. For a man might be prudent, or again just, and at the same time profligate and unable to control his passions. He said too that the wise man was not exempt from all passions, but indulged them in moderation.He defined friendship as an equality of reciprocal good-will, including under the term as one species the friendship of kinsmen, as another that of lovers, and as a third that of host and guest. The end of love was not merely intercourse but also philosophy. According to him the wise man would fall in love and take part in politics; furthermore he would marry and reside at a king's court. of three kinds of life, the contemplative, the practical, and the pleasure-loving life, he gave the preference to the contemplative. He held that the studies which make up the ordinary education are of service for the attainment of virtue. 7.121. But Heraclides of Tarsus, who was the disciple of Antipater of Tarsus, and Athenodorus both assert that sins are not equal.Again, the Stoics say that the wise man will take part in politics, if nothing hinders him – so, for instance, Chrysippus in the first book of his work On Various Types of Life – since thus he will restrain vice and promote virtue. Also (they maintain) he will marry, as Zeno says in his Republic, and beget children. Moreover, they say that the wise man will never form mere opinions, that is to say, he will never give assent to anything that is false; that he will also play the Cynic, Cynicism being a short cut to virtue, as Apollodorus calls it in his Ethics; that he will even turn cannibal under stress of circumstances. They declare that he alone is free and bad men are slaves, freedom being power of independent action, whereas slavery is privation of the same;


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, objections to Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125, 298, 299
adultery Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 157
adultery mimes' Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 157
asmis, elizabeth Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125
cicero Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 157
courtney, edward Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 157
evans, h. b. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 299
frankness, invective masquerading as Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 299
frankness Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 299
horace, (alleged) sexual practices Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298, 299
konstan, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 157
panaetius of rhodes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125
persona of horace, criticised by interlocutors Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 289, 298, 299
plaza, maria Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125, 289, 298, 299
satires (horace), characterisation of protagonists Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 299
stahl, hans-peter Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 289
stoicism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 157
stoics/stoicism, condemned by horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125
suetonius, life of horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298
titus albucius, toady, figure of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 289
tsakiropoulou-summers, anastasia Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 125