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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 2.7


nanand, in the second place, he accuses those Jews that are inhabitants of Alexandria; as, in the third place, he mixes with these things such accusations as concern the sacred purifications, with the other legal rites used in the temple.


nanThese Egyptians therefore were the authors of these troubles, who not having the constancy of Macedonians, nor the prudence of Grecians, indulged all of them the evil manners of the Egyptians, and continued their ancient hatred against us;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 2.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.23. quid ergo attinet dicere: 'Nihil haberem, quod reprehenderem, si finitas cupiditates haberent'? hoc est dicere: Non reprehenderem asotos, si non essent asoti. isto modo ne improbos quidem, si essent boni viri. hic homo severus luxuriam ipsam per se reprehendendam non putat, et hercule, Torquate, ut verum loquamur, si summum bonum voluptas est, rectissime non putat. Noli noli Se. nolui N nolim rell. codd. enim mihi fingere asotos, ut soletis, qui in mensam vomant, et qui de conviviis auferantur crudique postridie se rursus ingurgitent, qui solem, ut aiunt, nec occidentem umquam viderint nec orientem, qui consumptis patrimoniis egeant. nemo nostrum istius generis asotos iucunde putat vivere. mundos, elegantis, optimis cocis, pistoribus, piscatu, aucupio, venatione, his omnibus exquisitis, vitantes cruditatem, quibus vinum quibus vinum et q. s. cf. Lucilii carm. rell. rec. Marx. I p. 78, II p. 366 sq. defusum e pleno sit chrysizon, chrysizon Marx.; hirsizon A hrysizon vel heysizon B hrysizon E hyrsi|hon R hyrsizon N hrysiron V ut ait Lucilius, cui nihildum situlus et nihildum situlus et (situlus = situla, sitella) Se. nihil (nichil BE) dum sit vis et ABE nichil dum sit viset R nichil dempsit (e vid. corr. ex u, psit in ras. ) vis (post s ras.) et (in ras.) N nichil dempsit vis et V sacculus sacculus ABE saculos V sarculos R, N (a ex corr. m. alt., r superscr. ab alt. m. ) abstulerit, adhibentis ludos et quae sequuntur, illa, quibus detractis clamat Epicurus se nescire quid sit bonum; adsint etiam formosi pueri, qui ministrent, respondeat his vestis, argentum, Corinthium, locus ipse, aedificium—hos ergo ergo BER ego ANV asotos bene quidem vivere aut aut at BE beate numquam dixerim. 2.23.  "What then is the point of saying 'I should have no fault to find with them if they kept their desires within bounds'? That is tantamount to saying 'I should not blame the profligate if they were not profligate.' He might as well say he would not blame the dishonest either, if they were upright men. Here is our rigid moralist maintaining that sensuality is not in itself blameworthy! And I profess, Torquatus, on the hypothesis that pleasure is the Chief Good he is perfectly justified in thinking so. I should be sorry to picture to myself, as you are so fond of doing, debauchees who are sick at table, have to be carried home from dinner-parties, and next day gorge themselves again before they have recovered from the effects of the night before; men who, as the saying goes, have never seen either sunset or sunrise; men who run through their inheritance and sink into penury. None of us supposes that profligates of that description live pleasantly. No, but men of taste and refinement, with first-rate chefs and confectioners, fish, birds, game and the like of the choicest; careful of their digestion; with Wine in flask Decanted from a new‑broach'd cask, . . . as Lucilius has it, Wine of tang bereft, All harshness in the strainer left; with the accompaniment of dramatic performances and their usual sequel, the pleasures apart from which Epicurus, as he loudly proclaims, does not what Good is; give them also beautiful boys to wait upon them, with drapery, silver, Corinthian bronzes, and the scene of the feast, the banqueting-room, all in keeping; take profligates of this sort; that these live well or enjoy happiness I will never allow.
2. Horace, Sermones, 1.1.24, 1.2-1.3, 1.2.33, 1.2.116, 1.4.25-1.4.32, 1.4.34, 1.5-1.6, 1.6.112-1.6.115, 1.8, 1.10, 2.1, 2.1.48, 2.1.71-2.1.74, 2.2.2, 2.2.53, 2.2.79, 2.3-2.6, 2.4.44-2.4.45, 2.6.1, 2.6.30-2.6.31, 2.6.60, 2.6.64, 2.6.71, 2.7.44, 2.7.56-2.7.67, 2.7.73, 2.7.83, 2.7.103, 2.7.111-2.7.112, 2.8, 2.8.61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. However, since I observe a considerable number of people giving ear to the reproaches that are laid against us by those who bear ill will to us, and will not believe what I have written concerning the antiquity of our nation, while they take it for a plain sign that our nation is of a late date, because they are not so much as vouchsafed a bare mention by the most famous historiographers among the Grecians 1.2. for if we remember, that in the beginning the Greeks had taken no care to have public records of their several transactions preserved, this must for certain have afforded those that would afterward write about those ancient transactions, the opportunity of making mistakes, and the power of making lies also; 1.2. Moreover, he attests that we Jews, went as auxiliaries along with king Alexander, and after him with his successors. I will add farther what he says he learned when he was himself with the same army, concerning the actions of a man that was a Jew. His words are these:— 1.3. I therefore have thought myself under an obligation to write somewhat briefly about these subjects, in order to convict those that reproach us of spite and voluntary falsehood, and to correct the ignorance of others, and withal to instruct all those who are desirous of knowing the truth of what great antiquity we really are. 1.3. 7. For our forefathers did not only appoint the best of these priests, and those that attended upon the divine worship, for that design from the beginning, but made provision that the stock of the priests should continue unmixed and pure; 1.3. Besides all this, Ramesses, the son of Amenophis, by Manetho’s account, was a young man, and assisted his father in his war, and left the country at the same time with him, and fled into Ethiopia: but Cheremon makes him to have been born in a certain cave, after his father was dead, and that he then overcame the Jews in battle, and drove them into Syria, being in number about two hundred thousand. 1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.6. 2. And now, in the first place, I cannot but greatly wonder at those men who suppose that we must attend to none but Grecians, when we are inquiring about the most ancient facts, and must inform ourselves of their truth from them only, while we must not believe ourselves nor other men; for I am convinced that the very reverse is the truth of the case. I mean this,—if we will not be led by vain opinions, but will make inquiry after truth from facts themselves; 1.6. 12. As for ourselves, therefore, we neither inhabit a maritime country, nor do we delight in merchandise, nor in such a mixture with other men as arises from it; but the cities we dwell in are remote from the sea, and having a fruitful country for our habitation, we take pains in cultivating that only. Our principal care of all is this, to educate our children well; and we think it to be the most necessary business of our whole life to observe the laws that have been given us, and to keep those rules of piety that have been delivered down to us. 1.8. However, they acknowledge themselves so far, that they were the Egyptians, the Chaldeans, and the Phoenicians (for I will not now reckon ourselves among them) that have preserved the memorials of the most ancient and most lasting traditions of mankind; 1.8. When this man had reigned thirteen years, after him reigned another, whose name was Beon, for forty-four years; after him reigned another, called Apachnas, thirty-six years and seven months; after him Apophis reigned sixty-one years, and then Jonias fifty years and one month; 2.1. 1. In the former book, most honored Epaphroditus, I have demonstrated our antiquity, and confirmed the truth of what I have said, from the writings of the Phoenicians, and Chaldeans, and Egyptians. I have, moreover, produced many of the Grecian writers, as witnesses thereto. I have also made a refutation of Manetho and Cheremon, and of certain others of our enemies. 2.1. for in his third book, which relates to the affairs of Egypt, he speaks thus:—“I have heard of the ancient men of Egypt, that Moses was of Heliopolis, and that he thought himself obliged to follow the customs of his forefathers, and offered his prayers in the open air, towards the city walls; but that he reduced them all to be directed towards the sun-rising, which was agreeable to the situation of Heliopolis; 2.1. Or how is it possible that all the Jews should get together to these sacrifices, and the entrails of one man should be sufficient for so many thousands to taste of them, as Apion pretends? Or why did not the king carry this man, whosoever he was, and whatsoever was his name (which is not set down in Apion’s book) 2.3. for some of his writings contain much the same accusations which the others have laid against us, some things that he hath added are very frigid and contemptible, and for the greatest part of what he says, it is very scurrilous, and, to speak no more than the plain truth, it shows him to be a very unlearned person, and what he lays together looks like the work of a man of very bad morals, and of one no better in his whole life than a mountebank. 2.3. for you see how justly he calls those Egyptians whom he hates, and endeavors to reproach; for had he not deemed Egyptians to be a name of great reproach, he would not have avoided the name of an Egyptian himself; as we know that those who brag of their own countries, value themselves upon the denomination they acquire thereby, and reprove such as unjustly lay claim thereto. 2.4. Yet, because there are a great many men so very foolish, that they are rather caught by such orations than by what is written with care, and take pleasure in reproaching other men, and cannot abide to hear them commended, I thought it to be necessary not to let this man go off without examination, who had written such an accusation against us, as if he would bring us to make an answer in open court. 2.4. nay, the kindness and humanity of the Romans hath been so great, that it hath granted leave to almost all others to take the same name of Romans upon them; I mean not particular men only, but entire and large nations themselves also; for those anciently named Iberi, and Tyrrheni, and Sabini, are now called Romani: 2.5. For I also have observed, that many men are very much delighted when they see a man who first began to reproach another, to be himself exposed to contempt on account of the vices he hath himself been guilty of. 2.5. for when these Alexandrians were making war with Cleopatra the queen, and were in danger of being utterly ruined, these Jews brought them to terms of agreement, and freed them from the miseries of a civil war. “But then (says Apion) Onias brought a small army afterward upon the city at the time when Thermus the Roman ambassador was there present.” 2.6. However, it is not a very easy thing to go over this man’s discourse, nor to know plainly what he means; yet does he seem, amidst a great confusion and disorder in his falsehoods, to produce, in the first place, such things as resemble what we have examined already, and relate to the departure of our forefathers out of Egypt; 2.6. nay, when last of all Caesar had taken Alexandria, she came to that pitch of cruelty, that she declared she had some hope of preserving her affairs still, in case she could kill the Jews, though it were with her own hand; to such a degree of barbarity and perfidiousness had she arrived; and doth any one think that we cannot boast ourselves of any thing, if, as Apion says, this queen did not at a time of famine distribute wheat among us? 2.8. 2. Now, although I cannot but think that I have already demonstrated, and that abundantly, more than was necessary, that our fathers were not originally Egyptians, nor were thence expelled, either on account of bodily diseases, or any other calamities of that sort 2.8. for Apion hath the impudence to pretend, that “the Jews placed an ass’s head in their holy place;” and he affirms that this was discovered when Antiochus Epiphanes spoiled our temple, and found that ass’s head there made of gold, and worth a great deal of money.
3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.1066-3.1067 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.364-8.365 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows
5. Juvenal, Satires, 15.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 36.7, 38.1, 48.2-48.3, 67.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 36.7, 38.1, 48.2-48.3, 67.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.21.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 18.4, 31.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, roman Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 392
anger, and humor Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
anger, right to anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
anger Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
animals Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
apicius, gaius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125
architecture Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
authenticity, thematized in satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
avaritia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
banquets Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
britannicus, murder of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 287
caligula, c. iulius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
canidia Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164
censor Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
clothing Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125, 149
comedy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155
dialogue Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
diatribe Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
diction, low Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155
didactic style Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164
dryden, john Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
emotion Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
epic, exempla from Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155, 156
euphemism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 156
exemplum / exempla Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 124
fool Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125
friendship and the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164, 165
greediness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
horace, works, epodes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164
horace, works, satires, arrangements of poems Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164, 165
hospitality Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 287
house of the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
humor, absent from juvenal’s program Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
hyperbole Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
indignatio Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
indirect approach Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155
jewels Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125
kin murder Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 287
laronia Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155, 156, 164, 165
lucretius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
lust vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
maecenas Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
martial Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46, 152
matius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
moderation Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
nature Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
nero claudius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125
night Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
obscenity Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 156
ofellus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
plato Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
pleasure, of audiences Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
plotius tucca Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
priapus Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 392
proxy satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
revenge, against satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
rhetorical education, juvenal’s evidenced Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
satire, hexameter Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 392
saturnalia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
self-examination Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
sermo, horace on Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
slaves and slavery' Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 287
stoicism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 156, 164, 165; Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125, 149
tableware Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164
tranquility Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
trimalchio Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125
varillus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
virtue, (personified) virtue Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
virtue Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125, 149
vomit Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
weeping, as response to satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
wine Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 125