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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 2.3


nanfor some of his writings contain much the same accusations which the others have laid against us, some things that he hath added are very frigid and contemptible, and for the greatest part of what he says, it is very scurrilous, and, to speak no more than the plain truth, it shows him to be a very unlearned person, and what he lays together looks like the work of a man of very bad morals, and of one no better in his whole life than a mountebank.


nanfor you see how justly he calls those Egyptians whom he hates, and endeavors to reproach; for had he not deemed Egyptians to be a name of great reproach, he would not have avoided the name of an Egyptian himself; as we know that those who brag of their own countries, value themselves upon the denomination they acquire thereby, and reprove such as unjustly lay claim thereto.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 30, 24 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

24. And in his search an endless joy he found
2. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

21a. He was my comrade from a youth and the comrade of your democratic party, and shared in the recent exile and came back with you. And you know the kind of man Chaerephon was, how impetuous in whatever he undertook. Well, once he went to Delphi and made so bold as to ask the oracle this question; and, gentlemen, don’t make a disturbance at what I say; for he asked if there were anyone wiser than I. Now the Pythia replied that there was no one wiser. And about these things his brother here will bear you witness, since Chaerephon is dead.
3. Lucilius Gaius, Fragments, 1207 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Letters, 2.1, 2.2.49-2.2.52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.1. 1. After the death of Isaac, his sons divided their habitations respectively; nor did they retain what they had before; but Esau departed from the city of Hebron, and left it to his brother, and dwelt in Seir, and ruled over Idumea. He called the country by that name from himself, for he was named Adom; which appellation he got on the following occasion:— 2.1. This affection of his father excited the envy and the hatred of his brethren; as did also his dreams which he saw, and related to his father, and to them, which foretold his future happiness, it being usual with mankind to envy their very nearest relations such their prosperity. Now the visions which Joseph saw in his sleep were these:— 2.1. 3. Now these brethren of his were under distraction and terror, and thought that very great danger hung over them; yet not at all reflecting upon their brother Joseph, and standing firm under the accusations laid against them, they made their defense by Reubel, the eldest of them, who now became their spokesman:
5. Horace, Sermones, 1.1.24, 1.1.61, 1.3, 1.3.20, 1.3.76, 1.3.85, 1.3.93-1.3.96, 1.3.98, 1.3.115, 1.3.122-1.3.123, 1.3.128-1.3.133, 1.3.139-1.3.140, 1.4.1, 1.4.25-1.4.32, 1.4.34, 1.4.117, 1.5-1.6, 1.6.50, 1.6.86, 1.8, 1.10, 2.1, 2.1.32-2.1.34, 2.1.48, 2.1.71-2.1.74, 2.2.2, 2.2.53, 2.2.79, 2.3.13-2.3.16, 2.3.18-2.3.20, 2.3.24-2.3.26, 2.3.34-2.3.35, 2.3.225, 2.3.314-2.3.320, 2.4-2.8, 2.4.44-2.4.45, 2.6.1, 2.6.4-2.6.5, 2.6.71, 2.6.79-2.6.117, 2.7.1, 2.7.66, 2.7.103, 2.8.61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3. I therefore have thought myself under an obligation to write somewhat briefly about these subjects, in order to convict those that reproach us of spite and voluntary falsehood, and to correct the ignorance of others, and withal to instruct all those who are desirous of knowing the truth of what great antiquity we really are. 1.3. 7. For our forefathers did not only appoint the best of these priests, and those that attended upon the divine worship, for that design from the beginning, but made provision that the stock of the priests should continue unmixed and pure; 1.3. Besides all this, Ramesses, the son of Amenophis, by Manetho’s account, was a young man, and assisted his father in his war, and left the country at the same time with him, and fled into Ethiopia: but Cheremon makes him to have been born in a certain cave, after his father was dead, and that he then overcame the Jews in battle, and drove them into Syria, being in number about two hundred thousand. 1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.6. 2. And now, in the first place, I cannot but greatly wonder at those men who suppose that we must attend to none but Grecians, when we are inquiring about the most ancient facts, and must inform ourselves of their truth from them only, while we must not believe ourselves nor other men; for I am convinced that the very reverse is the truth of the case. I mean this,—if we will not be led by vain opinions, but will make inquiry after truth from facts themselves; 1.6. 12. As for ourselves, therefore, we neither inhabit a maritime country, nor do we delight in merchandise, nor in such a mixture with other men as arises from it; but the cities we dwell in are remote from the sea, and having a fruitful country for our habitation, we take pains in cultivating that only. Our principal care of all is this, to educate our children well; and we think it to be the most necessary business of our whole life to observe the laws that have been given us, and to keep those rules of piety that have been delivered down to us. 1.8. However, they acknowledge themselves so far, that they were the Egyptians, the Chaldeans, and the Phoenicians (for I will not now reckon ourselves among them) that have preserved the memorials of the most ancient and most lasting traditions of mankind; 1.8. When this man had reigned thirteen years, after him reigned another, whose name was Beon, for forty-four years; after him reigned another, called Apachnas, thirty-six years and seven months; after him Apophis reigned sixty-one years, and then Jonias fifty years and one month; 2.1. 1. In the former book, most honored Epaphroditus, I have demonstrated our antiquity, and confirmed the truth of what I have said, from the writings of the Phoenicians, and Chaldeans, and Egyptians. I have, moreover, produced many of the Grecian writers, as witnesses thereto. I have also made a refutation of Manetho and Cheremon, and of certain others of our enemies. 2.1. for in his third book, which relates to the affairs of Egypt, he speaks thus:—“I have heard of the ancient men of Egypt, that Moses was of Heliopolis, and that he thought himself obliged to follow the customs of his forefathers, and offered his prayers in the open air, towards the city walls; but that he reduced them all to be directed towards the sun-rising, which was agreeable to the situation of Heliopolis; 2.1. Or how is it possible that all the Jews should get together to these sacrifices, and the entrails of one man should be sufficient for so many thousands to taste of them, as Apion pretends? Or why did not the king carry this man, whosoever he was, and whatsoever was his name (which is not set down in Apion’s book) 2.4. Yet, because there are a great many men so very foolish, that they are rather caught by such orations than by what is written with care, and take pleasure in reproaching other men, and cannot abide to hear them commended, I thought it to be necessary not to let this man go off without examination, who had written such an accusation against us, as if he would bring us to make an answer in open court. 2.4. nay, the kindness and humanity of the Romans hath been so great, that it hath granted leave to almost all others to take the same name of Romans upon them; I mean not particular men only, but entire and large nations themselves also; for those anciently named Iberi, and Tyrrheni, and Sabini, are now called Romani: 2.5. For I also have observed, that many men are very much delighted when they see a man who first began to reproach another, to be himself exposed to contempt on account of the vices he hath himself been guilty of. 2.5. for when these Alexandrians were making war with Cleopatra the queen, and were in danger of being utterly ruined, these Jews brought them to terms of agreement, and freed them from the miseries of a civil war. “But then (says Apion) Onias brought a small army afterward upon the city at the time when Thermus the Roman ambassador was there present.” 2.6. However, it is not a very easy thing to go over this man’s discourse, nor to know plainly what he means; yet does he seem, amidst a great confusion and disorder in his falsehoods, to produce, in the first place, such things as resemble what we have examined already, and relate to the departure of our forefathers out of Egypt; 2.6. nay, when last of all Caesar had taken Alexandria, she came to that pitch of cruelty, that she declared she had some hope of preserving her affairs still, in case she could kill the Jews, though it were with her own hand; to such a degree of barbarity and perfidiousness had she arrived; and doth any one think that we cannot boast ourselves of any thing, if, as Apion says, this queen did not at a time of famine distribute wheat among us? 2.7. and, in the second place, he accuses those Jews that are inhabitants of Alexandria; as, in the third place, he mixes with these things such accusations as concern the sacred purifications, with the other legal rites used in the temple. /p 2.7. These Egyptians therefore were the authors of these troubles, who not having the constancy of Macedonians, nor the prudence of Grecians, indulged all of them the evil manners of the Egyptians, and continued their ancient hatred against us; 2.8. 2. Now, although I cannot but think that I have already demonstrated, and that abundantly, more than was necessary, that our fathers were not originally Egyptians, nor were thence expelled, either on account of bodily diseases, or any other calamities of that sort 2.8. for Apion hath the impudence to pretend, that “the Jews placed an ass’s head in their holy place;” and he affirms that this was discovered when Antiochus Epiphanes spoiled our temple, and found that ass’s head there made of gold, and worth a great deal of money.
6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.310-3.311 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.364-8.365 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows
8. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 32.9 (1st cent. CE

32.9.  And as for the Cynics, as they are called, it is true that the city contains no small number of that sect, and that, like any other thing, this too has had its crop — persons whose tenets, to be sure, comprise practically nothing spurious or ignoble, yet who must make a living — still these Cynics, posting themselves at street-corners, in alley-ways, and at temple-gates, pass round the hat and play upon the credulity of lads and sailors and crowds of that sort, stringing together rough jokes and much tittle-tattle and that low badinage that smacks of the market-place. Accordingly they achieve no good at all, but rather the worst possible harm, for they accustom thoughtless people to deride philosophers in general, just as one might accustom lads to scorn their teachers, and, when they ought to knock the insolence out of their hearers, these Cynics merely increase it.
9. Epictetus, Discourses, 3.22.97 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Juvenal, Satires, 10, 2, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Persius, Satires, 5.151-5.153 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Persius, Saturae, 5.151-5.153 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 31.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 65.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
anger, and humor Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
anger, right to anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
animals Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
asyndeton Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 84
authenticity, thematized in satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152, 160
avaritia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
banquets Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
bion Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 134
canidia Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164
catullus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 135
censor Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
cicero, m. tullius, philosophical content of letters Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
clothing Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
comedy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155
cynicism Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
cynics/cynicism Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
damasippus and mercury Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
de re rustica (varro), genre of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
de re rustica (varro), philosophy in Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
dialogue Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
diatribe Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
diction, low Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155
didactic style Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 159, 164
dryden, john Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
emotion Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
ennius Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
epic, exempla from Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 84, 134, 135, 155
florus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 472
frankness Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
friendship and the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 59, 152, 160
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 84, 134, 135, 164, 165
gluttony Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
hermaion Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
horace, and sabine estate Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
horace, odes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
horace, satires Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
horace, works, ars poetica Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 472
horace, works, epodes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164
horace, works, satires, arrangements of poems Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164, 165
horace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
house of the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152, 160
human condition Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
humor, absent from juvenal’s program Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
idleness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46, 59
indignatio Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
indirect approach Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 135, 155
jewels Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
juvenal, stoics and cynics Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
laronia Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 84, 134, 135, 155, 159, 164, 165
lucretius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 84, 165
lust vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
maecenas Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
martial Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46, 59, 149, 152, 160
matius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
mercury/hermes, and commerce Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
mercury/hermes, in horace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
occupatio with at Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 134
ofellus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 165
ordo Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 472
pastoral epistles Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
personification vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
philippi Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 169
philosophy, literary inspiration from Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 149
philosophy, relationship to satire Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
plato Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 135, 165; Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
pleasure, of audiences Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
pleasure Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191; Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
plotius tucca Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
politics Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 160
prayer Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 149
preacher, wandering Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
preaching, street Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
proxy satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46, 59
pseudonym Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 159
revenge, against satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
rhetorical education, juvenal’s evidenced Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
satire, present approach to Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
satire, relationship with philosophy Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
self-examination Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 149, 152
seneca the younger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 160
sermo, horace on Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 149, 152
simon the shoemaker Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
stoicism, vs. cynics Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
stoicism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 84, 135, 164, 165; Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191; Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 164
tranquility Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 149, 152, 160
umbricius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 59, 160
varillus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 46
varro, m. terentius, as author of saturae menippeae Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20
venosa Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 134
virtue, (personified) virtue Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
virtue Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 87
weapon' Malherbe et al., Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J (2014) 191
weeping, as response to satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 9
xenophon Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 20