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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 2.1.72
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.6-7.15 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.4. quamquam id quidem etiam duodecim tabulae declarant, tb. 8, 1 Br. condi iam tum solitum esse carmen; quod ne liceret fieri ad ad X in V 2 alterius iniuriam, iniuriam infamiam add. V 2 ( sed C. non ut rep. 4, 12 ipsa legis verba affert ) lege legem V 1 (m. del. 2 ) longe K sanxerunt. nec vero illud non eruditorum temporum argumentum est, quod et deorum pulvinaribus et epulis magistratuum fides praecinunt, quod proprium eius fuit, de qua loquor, disciplinae. mihi quidem etiam Appii appii+ tuberonem K 1 ( etiam +), reliqua in mg. add. K c Caeci carmen, quod valde Panaetius laudat epistola quadam, quae est ad Q. ad Q. V rec s atque X Tuberonem, Pythagoreum pythagoreorum X corr. V 2? videtur. multa multae GR 1 ( corr. 1 ) V 1 ( corr. 2? ) etiam sunt in nostris institutis ducta ductis ducta K autc ab illis; quae praetereo, ne ea, quae repperisse perperisse X peperisse K 2 s repperisse Dav. ( cf. nat. deor. 2, 16 ) ipsi putamur, aliunde didicisse videamur. aliunde didicisse videamur post 13 nostros habet X. suo loco posuit V c
3. Lucilius Gaius, Fragments, 1327, 1326 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4. Terence, Adelphi, 19, 18 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Letters, 1.20.23, 2.1.153 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Horace, Epodes, 14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Horace, Sermones, 1.2.21-1.2.22, 1.2.30-1.2.35, 1.3, 1.6.47, 1.6.50, 1.6.62-1.6.63, 1.7, 1.10.48-1.10.49, 2.1.2, 2.1.7, 2.1.9, 2.1.11-2.1.21, 2.1.23-2.1.24, 2.1.27-2.1.36, 2.1.39-2.1.42, 2.1.47-2.1.64, 2.1.67, 2.1.71, 2.1.73-2.1.86, 2.3, 2.6.1, 2.6.60-2.6.66, 2.6.71-2.6.117, 2.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3. I therefore have thought myself under an obligation to write somewhat briefly about these subjects, in order to convict those that reproach us of spite and voluntary falsehood, and to correct the ignorance of others, and withal to instruct all those who are desirous of knowing the truth of what great antiquity we really are. 1.3. 7. For our forefathers did not only appoint the best of these priests, and those that attended upon the divine worship, for that design from the beginning, but made provision that the stock of the priests should continue unmixed and pure; 1.3. Besides all this, Ramesses, the son of Amenophis, by Manetho’s account, was a young man, and assisted his father in his war, and left the country at the same time with him, and fled into Ethiopia: but Cheremon makes him to have been born in a certain cave, after his father was dead, and that he then overcame the Jews in battle, and drove them into Syria, being in number about two hundred thousand. 1.7. for they will find, that almost all which concerns the Greeks happened not long ago; nay, one may say, is of yesterday only. I speak of the building of their cities, the invention of their arts, and the description of their laws; and as for their care about the writing down of their histories, it is very near the last thing they set about. 1.7. Now, the very same thing will I endeavor to do; for I will bring the Egyptians and the Phoenicians as my principal witnesses, because nobody can complain of their testimony as false on account that they are known to have borne the greatest ill will towards us,—I mean this as to the Egyptians, in general all of them, while of the Phoenicians it is known the Tyrians have been most of all in the same ill disposition towards us: 2.3. for some of his writings contain much the same accusations which the others have laid against us, some things that he hath added are very frigid and contemptible, and for the greatest part of what he says, it is very scurrilous, and, to speak no more than the plain truth, it shows him to be a very unlearned person, and what he lays together looks like the work of a man of very bad morals, and of one no better in his whole life than a mountebank. 2.3. for you see how justly he calls those Egyptians whom he hates, and endeavors to reproach; for had he not deemed Egyptians to be a name of great reproach, he would not have avoided the name of an Egyptian himself; as we know that those who brag of their own countries, value themselves upon the denomination they acquire thereby, and reprove such as unjustly lay claim thereto. 2.7. and, in the second place, he accuses those Jews that are inhabitants of Alexandria; as, in the third place, he mixes with these things such accusations as concern the sacred purifications, with the other legal rites used in the temple. /p 2.7. These Egyptians therefore were the authors of these troubles, who not having the constancy of Macedonians, nor the prudence of Grecians, indulged all of them the evil manners of the Egyptians, and continued their ancient hatred against us;
8. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.371 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.364-8.365 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows
10. Juvenal, Satires, 3, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Persius, Satires, 1.107-1.120, 1.123-1.125, 1.133 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Persius, Saturae, 1.107-1.120, 1.123-1.125, 1.133 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 31.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
aelius stilo Breed, Keitel and Wallace, Lucilius and Satire in Second-Century BC Rome (2018) 261
ambiguous Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 129
anecdote Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
anger, as “firstâ€\x9d emotion Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42
animals Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
authenticity, thematized in satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
bacon, roger Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 200
dialogue Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42
diction, grand Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
dining Breed, Keitel and Wallace, Lucilius and Satire in Second-Century BC Rome (2018) 261
ennius, tentatively deduced as model Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 129
ennius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
epic, exempla from Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 129
fire imagery Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42
friendship and the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 61, 152
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 129
golden mean Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
historical subject matter Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42
homer Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
horace, detractors Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 129
house of the satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42, 61
libertas, repressed or compromised Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42
lucilius, and anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 129; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 61
luxury Breed, Keitel and Wallace, Lucilius and Satire in Second-Century BC Rome (2018) 261
maecenas Breed, Keitel and Wallace, Lucilius and Satire in Second-Century BC Rome (2018) 261; Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 200; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
marginality, and citizenship Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 69
martial Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42, 61, 152
messalla Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 129
nero Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 42
obscenity Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
occentare Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 129
patronage Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 61
persius Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 69
proxy satirist Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 61
satire' Breed, Keitel and Wallace, Lucilius and Satire in Second-Century BC Rome (2018) 261
self-examination Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
sermo, horace on Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 129
tranquility Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 152
twelfe tables Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 129
umbricius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 61
weininger, otto Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 200
word-play (etymological, puns, ambiguity) Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 129
αἶνος Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74