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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.9.69
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 10.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

10.34. And all the feasts and sabbaths and new moons and appointed days, and the three days before a feast and the three after a feast -- let them all be days of immunity and release for all the Jews who are in my kingdom.
2. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 6.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6.7. On the monthly celebration of the king's birthday, the Jews were taken, under bitter constraint, to partake of the sacrifices; and when the feast of Dionysus came, they were compelled to walk in the procession in honor of Dionysus, wearing wreaths of ivy.'
3. Septuagint, Judith, 8.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 0th cent. CE)

8.6. She fasted all the days of her widowhood, except the day before the sabbath and the sabbath itself, the day before the new moon and the day of the new moon, and the feasts and days of rejoicing of the house of Israel.
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 40.3.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Sermones, 1.9.68, 1.9.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 361 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

361. But when he had given some of his orders about the buildings, he then asked a very important and solemn question; "why is it that you abstain from eating pig's flesh?" And then again at this question such a violent laughter was raised by our adversaries, partly because they were really delighted, and partly as they wished to court the emperor out of flattery, and therefore wished to make it appear that this question was dictated by wit and uttered with grace, that some of the servants who were following him were indigt at their appearing to treat the emperor with so little respect, since it was not safe for his most intimate friends to do so much as smile at his words.
7. New Testament, Mark, 6.22-6.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.22. When the daughter of Herodias herself came in and danced, she pleased Herod and those sitting with him. The king said to the young lady, "Ask me whatever you want, and I will give it to you. 6.23. He swore to her, "Whatever you shall ask of me, I will give you, up to half of my kingdom. 6.24. She went out, and said to her mother, "What shall I ask?"She said, "The head of John the Baptizer. 6.25. She came in immediately with haste to the king, and asked, "I want you to give me right now the head of John the Baptizer on a platter.
8. New Testament, Matthew, 14.6-14.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.6. But when Herod's birthday came, the daughter of Herodias danced among them and pleased Herod. 14.7. Whereupon he promised with an oath to give her whatever she should ask. 14.8. She, being prompted by her mother, said, "Give me here on a platter the head of John the Baptizer.
9. Persius, Satires, 5.184 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Persius, Saturae, 5.184 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 5.70 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Tacitus, Histories, 5.4-5.5, 5.10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.4.  To establish his influence over this people for all time, Moses introduced new religious practices, quite opposed to those of all other religions. The Jews regard as profane all that we hold sacred; on the other hand, they permit all that we abhor. They dedicated, in a shrine, a statue of that creature whose guidance enabled them to put an end to their wandering and thirst, sacrificing a ram, apparently in derision of Ammon. They likewise offer the ox, because the Egyptians worship Apis. They abstain from pork, in recollection of a plague, for the scab to which this animal is subject once afflicted them. By frequent fasts even now they bear witness to the long hunger with which they were once distressed, and the unleavened Jewish bread is still employed in memory of the haste with which they seized the grain. They say that they first chose to rest on the seventh day because that day ended their toils; but after a time they were led by the charms of indolence to give over the seventh year as well to inactivity. Others say that this is done in honour of Saturn, whether it be that the primitive elements of their religion were given by the Idaeans, who, according to tradition, were expelled with Saturn and became the founders of the Jewish race, or is due to the fact that, of the seven planets that rule the fortunes of mankind, Saturn moves in the highest orbit and has the greatest potency; and that many of the heavenly bodies traverse their paths and courses in multiples of seven. 5.5.  Whatever their origin, these rites are maintained by their antiquity: the other customs of the Jews are base and abominable, and owe their persistence to their depravity. For the worst rascals among other peoples, renouncing their ancestral religions, always kept sending tribute and contributions to Jerusalem, thereby increasing the wealth of the Jews; again, the Jews are extremely loyal toward one another, and always ready to show compassion, but toward every other people they feel only hate and enmity. They sit apart at meals, and they sleep apart, and although as a race, they are prone to lust, they abstain from intercourse with foreign women; yet among themselves nothing is unlawful. They adopted circumcision to distinguish themselves from other peoples by this difference. Those who are converted to their ways follow the same practice, and the earliest lesson they receive is to despise the gods, to disown their country, and to regard their parents, children, and brothers as of little account. However, they take thought to increase their numbers; for they regard it as a crime to kill any late-born child, and they believe that the souls of those who are killed in battle or by the executioner are immortal: hence comes their passion for begetting children, and their scorn of death. They bury the body rather than burn it, thus following the Egyptians' custom; they likewise bestow the same care on the dead, and hold the same belief about the world below; but their ideas of heavenly things are quite the opposite. The Egyptians worship many animals and monstrous images; the Jews conceive of one god only, and that with the mind alone: they regard as impious those who make from perishable materials representations of gods in man's image; that supreme and eternal being is to them incapable of representation and without end. Therefore they set up no statues in their cities, still less in their temples; this flattery is not paid their kings, nor this honour given to the Caesars. But since their priests used to chant to the accompaniment of pipes and cymbals and to wear garlands of ivy, and because a golden vine was found in their temple, some have thought that they were devotees of Father Liber, the conqueror of the East, in spite of the incongruity of their customs. For Liber established festive rites of a joyous nature, while the ways of the Jews are preposterous and mean. 5.10.  Still the Jews' patience lasted until Gessius Florus became procurator: in his time war began. When Cestius Gallus, governor of Syria, tried to stop it, he suffered varied fortunes and met defeat more often than he gained victory. On his death, whether in the course of nature or from vexation, Nero sent out Vespasian, who, aided by his good fortune and reputation as well as by his excellent subordinates, within two summers occupied with his victorious army the whole of the level country and all the cities except Jerusalem. The next year was taken up with civil war, and thus was passed in inactivity so far as the Jews were concerned. When peace had been secured throughout Italy, foreign troubles began again; and the fact that the Jews alone had failed to surrender increased our resentment; at the same time, having regard to all the possibilities and hazards of a new reign, it seemed expedient for Titus to remain with the army.
13. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 8.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Epigraphy, Cij, 173



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(on the jews) Witter et al., Torah, Temple, Land: Constructions of Judaism in Antiquity (2021) 235
berenike (north africa) Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
circumcision Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 123
collegia Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
diaspora, jewish / diaspora judaism Witter et al., Torah, Temple, Land: Constructions of Judaism in Antiquity (2021) 235
diaspora Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
food laws Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 123
hanukkah Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
hecataeus Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 123
herod antipas Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
iudaeus / iudaicus Witter et al., Torah, Temple, Land: Constructions of Judaism in Antiquity (2021) 235
jews, graeco-roman views of Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 123
judea Witter et al., Torah, Temple, Land: Constructions of Judaism in Antiquity (2021) 235
latin literature (on the jews) Witter et al., Torah, Temple, Land: Constructions of Judaism in Antiquity (2021) 235
misanthropy Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 123
new moon Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
petronius Witter et al., Torah, Temple, Land: Constructions of Judaism in Antiquity (2021) 235
rome, romans Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
sabbath Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 123; Witter et al., Torah, Temple, Land: Constructions of Judaism in Antiquity (2021) 235
synagogue Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200
zeus' Eckhardt, Jewish Identity and Politics Between the Maccabees and Bar Kokhba: Groups, Normativity, and Rituals (2011) 200