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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.7


nanfor they will find, that almost all which concerns the Greeks happened not long ago; nay, one may say, is of yesterday only. I speak of the building of their cities, the invention of their arts, and the description of their laws; and as for their care about the writing down of their histories, it is very near the last thing they set about.


nanNow, the very same thing will I endeavor to do; for I will bring the Egyptians and the Phoenicians as my principal witnesses, because nobody can complain of their testimony as false on account that they are known to have borne the greatest ill will towards us,—I mean this as to the Egyptians, in general all of them, while of the Phoenicians it is known the Tyrians have been most of all in the same ill disposition towards us:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Horace, Letters, 1.20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Horace, Epodes, 13, 16, 7, 10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Horace, Sermones, 1.1-1.6, 1.1.1, 1.1.3, 1.1.15, 1.2.21-1.2.22, 1.2.30-1.2.31, 1.2.33-1.2.35, 1.4.71-1.4.73, 1.4.108, 1.4.135, 1.6.49, 1.6.70, 1.6.93, 1.6.96, 1.8-1.10, 1.9.43-1.9.44, 1.10.44-1.10.45, 1.10.85, 1.10.92, 2.1.72 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. 1. I suppose that, by my books of the Antiquities of the Jews, most excellent Epaphroditus, I have made it evident to those who peruse them, that our Jewish nation is of very great antiquity, and had a distinct subsistence of its own originally; as also I have therein declared how we came to inhabit this country wherein we now live. Those Antiquities contain the history of five thousand years, and are taken out of our sacred books; but are translated by me into the Greek tongue. 1.1. but as for the place where the Grecians inhabit, ten thousand destructions have overtaken it, and blotted out the memory of former actions; so that they were ever beginning a new way of living, and supposed that every one of them was the origin of their new state. It was also late, and with difficulty, that they came to know the letters they now use; for those who would advance their use of these letters to the greatest antiquity pretend that they learned them from the Phoenicians and from Cadmus; 1.1. but after some considerable time, Armais, who was left in Egypt, did all those very things, by way of opposition, which his brother had forbidden him to do, without fear; for he used violence to the queen, and continued to make use of the rest of the concubines, without sparing any of them; nay, at the persuasion of his friends he put on the diadem, and set up to oppose his brother; 1.2. However, since I observe a considerable number of people giving ear to the reproaches that are laid against us by those who bear ill will to us, and will not believe what I have written concerning the antiquity of our nation, while they take it for a plain sign that our nation is of a late date, because they are not so much as vouchsafed a bare mention by the most famous historiographers among the Grecians 1.2. for if we remember, that in the beginning the Greeks had taken no care to have public records of their several transactions preserved, this must for certain have afforded those that would afterward write about those ancient transactions, the opportunity of making mistakes, and the power of making lies also; 1.2. Moreover, he attests that we Jews, went as auxiliaries along with king Alexander, and after him with his successors. I will add farther what he says he learned when he was himself with the same army, concerning the actions of a man that was a Jew. His words are these:— 1.3. I therefore have thought myself under an obligation to write somewhat briefly about these subjects, in order to convict those that reproach us of spite and voluntary falsehood, and to correct the ignorance of others, and withal to instruct all those who are desirous of knowing the truth of what great antiquity we really are. 1.3. 7. For our forefathers did not only appoint the best of these priests, and those that attended upon the divine worship, for that design from the beginning, but made provision that the stock of the priests should continue unmixed and pure; 1.3. Besides all this, Ramesses, the son of Amenophis, by Manetho’s account, was a young man, and assisted his father in his war, and left the country at the same time with him, and fled into Ethiopia: but Cheremon makes him to have been born in a certain cave, after his father was dead, and that he then overcame the Jews in battle, and drove them into Syria, being in number about two hundred thousand. 1.4. As for the witnesses whom I shall produce for the proof of what I say, they shall be such as are esteemed to be of the greatest reputation for truth, and the most skilful in the knowledge of all antiquity, by the Greeks themselves. I will also show, that those who have written so reproachfully and falsely about us, are to be convicted by what they have written themselves to the contrary. 1.4. but as to the time from the death of Moses till the reign of Artaxerxes, king of Persia, who reigned after Xerxes, the prophets, who were after Moses, wrote down what was done in their times in thirteen books. The remaining four books contain hymns to God, and precepts for the conduct of human life. 1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.6. 2. And now, in the first place, I cannot but greatly wonder at those men who suppose that we must attend to none but Grecians, when we are inquiring about the most ancient facts, and must inform ourselves of their truth from them only, while we must not believe ourselves nor other men; for I am convinced that the very reverse is the truth of the case. I mean this,—if we will not be led by vain opinions, but will make inquiry after truth from facts themselves; 1.6. 12. As for ourselves, therefore, we neither inhabit a maritime country, nor do we delight in merchandise, nor in such a mixture with other men as arises from it; but the cities we dwell in are remote from the sea, and having a fruitful country for our habitation, we take pains in cultivating that only. Our principal care of all is this, to educate our children well; and we think it to be the most necessary business of our whole life to observe the laws that have been given us, and to keep those rules of piety that have been delivered down to us. 1.8. However, they acknowledge themselves so far, that they were the Egyptians, the Chaldeans, and the Phoenicians (for I will not now reckon ourselves among them) that have preserved the memorials of the most ancient and most lasting traditions of mankind; 1.8. When this man had reigned thirteen years, after him reigned another, whose name was Beon, for forty-four years; after him reigned another, called Apachnas, thirty-six years and seven months; after him Apophis reigned sixty-one years, and then Jonias fifty years and one month; 1.9. for almost all these nations inhabit such countries as are least subject to destruction from the world about them; and these also have taken especial care to have nothing omitted of what was [remarkably] done among them; but their history was esteemed sacred, and put into public tables, as written by men of the greatest wisdom they had among them; 1.9. but that, as they were in fear of the Assyrians, who had then the dominion over Asia, they built a city in that country which is now called Judea, and that large enough to contain this great number of men, and called it Jerusalem.”
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.371 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vergil, Eclogues, 4-6, 10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
anecdote Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 112, 125
audience, as participants in performance Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 155
augustus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
brutus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 112, 113
callimachus, as literary critic Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
callimachus, proverbs Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
callimachus, use of proverbs and popular sayings Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
career, literary, satiric careers Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
career, literary Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
cicero Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
comedians, and kings Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
cuculus Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 155
diction, grand Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 112
didactic style Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 145
elegy Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
ennius, tentatively deduced as model Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
ennius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
epic parody and allusion Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 112, 113
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 112, 113, 125, 145
food, far Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24, 74, 112, 113, 125
gaze, at the grotesque Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
golden mean Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74
homer Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 112, 113, 145
horace, scriba' "758.0_399@iambus '15 (pannychis)" Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
horace, works, satires, arrangements of poems Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 125
horace Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
hunger, used to control slaves Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
hybridity Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
iambus, proverbs in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
influence, proverbs in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
insults, and civil status Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
insults, animal Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
labor, and verbal dueling Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154, 155
literary criticism, hellenistic, in iambi Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
location, praeneste Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 112, 113, 125, 145
lucretius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 145
lyric poetry Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
maecenas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
messalla Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
obscenity Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
oral forms, refrains Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 155
oral forms, verbal dueling, amoibaic Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
oral forms, verbal dueling, chiastic Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
oral forms, verbal dueling Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154, 155
panegyric Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113
paroemiography Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
performance, at dinners Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154, 155
performance, atellan farce Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 155
persius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
philippi Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
pliny the younger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
pollio, asinius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
propertius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
proverbs and popular sayings, and poets self-revelation Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
proverbs and popular sayings Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
realism, alexandrian Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
tibullus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
travel, by river barge Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154, 155
travel, by road' Richlin, Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy (2018) 154
varius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
virgil Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
word-play (etymological, puns, ambiguity) Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 112
αἶνος Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 74, 112
εὐθυµία Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 145