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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.6.72
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.76. nam ut illa praeteream, quae sunt furoris, futuris K 1 furoris haec ipsa per sese sese V ( exp. 3 ) quam habent levitatem, quae videntur esse mediocria, Iniu/riae Ter. Eun. 59–63 Suspi/ciones i/nimicitiae induciae RV indu/tiae Bellu/m pax rursum! ince/rta haec si tu si tu s sit ut X ( prius t exp. V 3 ) po/stules Ratio/ne certa fa/cere, nihilo plu/s plus add. G 2 agas, Quam si/ des operam, ut cu/m ratione insa/nias. haec inconstantia mutabilitasque mentis quem non ipsa pravitate deterreat? est etiam etiam Man. enim illud, quod in omni perturbatione dicitur, demonstrandum, nullam esse nisi opinabilem, nisi iudicio susceptam, nisi voluntariam. etenim si naturalis amor esset, amor esset ex amorem et K c et amarent omnes et semper amarent et idem amarent, et idem amarent om. H neque alium pudor, alium cogitatio, alium satietas deterreret. etenim ... 26 deterreret H deterret G 1 Ira vero, quae quae -ae in r. V 2 quam diu perturbat animum, dubitationem insaniae non habet, cuius inpulsu imp. KR existit etiam inter fratres tale iurgium:
2. Horace, Letters, 1.1.100, 1.18.13-1.18.14, 1.20.20, 1.20.27, 2.2.124 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Horace, Epodes, 9.3, 13.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Sermones, 1.3.64, 1.4.105-1.4.129, 1.5-1.6, 1.6.1-1.6.8, 1.6.11, 1.6.18-1.6.23, 1.6.29, 1.6.38-1.6.39, 1.6.43-1.6.71, 1.6.73-1.6.105, 1.6.107-1.6.112, 1.6.122-1.6.123, 1.6.125, 1.6.128-1.6.131, 1.7.11-1.7.15, 2.1.34-2.1.36, 2.3.307, 2.6.117 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.6. 2. And now, in the first place, I cannot but greatly wonder at those men who suppose that we must attend to none but Grecians, when we are inquiring about the most ancient facts, and must inform ourselves of their truth from them only, while we must not believe ourselves nor other men; for I am convinced that the very reverse is the truth of the case. I mean this,—if we will not be led by vain opinions, but will make inquiry after truth from facts themselves; 1.6. 12. As for ourselves, therefore, we neither inhabit a maritime country, nor do we delight in merchandise, nor in such a mixture with other men as arises from it; but the cities we dwell in are remote from the sea, and having a fruitful country for our habitation, we take pains in cultivating that only. Our principal care of all is this, to educate our children well; and we think it to be the most necessary business of our whole life to observe the laws that have been given us, and to keep those rules of piety that have been delivered down to us.
5. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, "135"



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
armstrong, david Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
ast Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111
autobiography Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
biography, biographical, auto- Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113
bion of borysthenes Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113
caesar, julius acta diurna, and cicero Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
cicero Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
cicero and caesar, letters to paetus Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
cicero and caesar Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
diatribe' Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113
diction, grand Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111
ennius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7
epic parody and allusion Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111
epicureanism and cicero Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111, 139
euphemism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
fable Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111, 139
gowers, emily Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
horace, childhood Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7
horace, life, as reflected /constructed in horaces works Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
horace, life Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
horace, self-presentation Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111
horace, vita horatii Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
horace lyric, and epicurean day, Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
horace lyric, and maecenas Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
horace lyric, describes his day Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
horace lyric, on salutatio Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
identification in place of simile Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7, 111, 139
maecenas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
parody Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111
reading aloud Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 111
rudd, niall Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
salutatio, avoidance and critique Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
satire Ker, Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome (2023) 179
suetonius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
venosa Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7
virgil Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7