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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.6


nan2. And now, in the first place, I cannot but greatly wonder at those men who suppose that we must attend to none but Grecians, when we are inquiring about the most ancient facts, and must inform ourselves of their truth from them only, while we must not believe ourselves nor other men; for I am convinced that the very reverse is the truth of the case. I mean this,—if we will not be led by vain opinions, but will make inquiry after truth from facts themselves;


nan12. As for ourselves, therefore, we neither inhabit a maritime country, nor do we delight in merchandise, nor in such a mixture with other men as arises from it; but the cities we dwell in are remote from the sea, and having a fruitful country for our habitation, we take pains in cultivating that only. Our principal care of all is this, to educate our children well; and we think it to be the most necessary business of our whole life to observe the laws that have been given us, and to keep those rules of piety that have been delivered down to us.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 18.85 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

18.85. /on the day when they laid thee in the bed of a mortal man. Would thou hadst remained where thou wast amid the immortal maidens of the sea, and that Peleus had taken to his home a mortal bride. But now—it was thus that thou too mightest have measureless grief at heart for thy dead son, whom thou shalt never again welcome
2. Cicero, On Duties, 2.70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.70. At vero ille tenuis, cum, quicquid factum sit, se spectatum, non fortunam putet, non modo illi, qui est meritus, sed etiam illis, a quibus exspectat (eget enim multis), gratum se videri studet neque vero verbis auget suum munus, si quo forte fungitur, sed etiam extenuat. Videndumque illud est, quod, si opulentum fortunatumque defenderis, in uno illo aut, si forte, in liberis eius manet gratia; sin autem inopem, probum tamen et modestum, omnes non improbi humiles, quae magna in populo multitudo est, praesidium sibi paratum vident. 2.70.  Your man of slender means, on the other hand, feels that whatever is done for him is done out of regard for himself and not for his outward circumstances. Hence he strives to show himself grateful not only to the one who has obliged him in the past but also to those from whom he expects similar favours in the future — and he needs the help of many; and his own service, if he happens to render any in return, he does not exaggerate, but he actually depreciates it. This fact, furthermore, should not be overlooked — that, if one defends a wealthy favourite of fortune, the favour does not extend further than to the man himself or, possibly, to his children. But, if one defends a man who is poor but honest and upright, all the lowly who are not dishonest — and there is a large proportion of that sort among the people — look upon such an advocate as a tower of defence raised up for them.
3. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Horace, Odes, 1.6.9-1.6.12, 3.1-3.6, 3.14, 3.25 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. 1. When Nero was informed of the Romans’ ill success in Judea, a concealed consternation and terror, as is usual in such cases, fell upon him; although he openly looked very big, and was very angry 3.1. They also esteem any errors they commit upon taking counsel beforehand to be better than such rash success as is owing to fortune only; because such a fortuitous advantage tempts them to be inconsiderate, while consultation, though it may sometimes fail of success, hath this good in it, that it makes men more careful hereafter; 3.1. This is an ancient city that is distant from Jerusalem five hundred and twenty furlongs, and was always an enemy to the Jews; on which account they determined to make their first effort against it, and to make their approaches to it as near as possible. 3.2. and said that what had happened was rather owing to the negligence of the commander, than to any valor of the enemy: and as he thought it fit for him, who bare the burden of the whole empire, to despise such misfortunes, he now pretended so to do, and to have a soul superior to all such sad accidents whatsoever. Yet did the disturbance that was in his soul plainly appear by the solicitude he was in [how to recover his affairs again]. 3.2. That he did not see what advantage he could bring to them now, by staying among them, but only provoke the Romans to besiege them more closely, as esteeming it a most valuable thing to take him; but that if they were once informed that he was fled out of the city, they would greatly remit of their eagerness against it. 3.2. and the greater part of the remainder were wounded, with Niger, their remaining general, who fled away together to a small city of Idumea, called Sallis. 3.3. 2. And as he was deliberating to whom he should commit the care of the East, now it was in so great a commotion, and who might be best able to punish the Jews for their rebellion, and might prevent the same distemper from seizing upon the neighboring nations also,— 3.3. So he came quickly to the city, and put his army in order, and set Trajan over the left wing, while he had the right himself, and led them to the siege: 3.3. At this city also the inhabitants of Sepphoris of Galilee met him, who were for peace with the Romans. 3.4. he found no one but Vespasian equal to the task, and able to undergo the great burden of so mighty a war, seeing he was growing an old man already in the camp, and from his youth had been exercised in warlike exploits: he was also a man that had long ago pacified the west, and made it subject to the Romans, when it had been put into disorder by the Germans; he had also recovered to them Britain by his arms 3.4. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.4. its length is also from Meloth to Thella, a village near to Jordan. 3.5. which had been little known before whereby he procured to his father Claudius to have a triumph bestowed on him without any sweat or labor of his own. 3.5. and for those rivers which they have, all their waters are exceedingly sweet: by reason also of the excellent grass they have, their cattle yield more milk than do those in other places; and, what is the greatest sign of excellency and of abundance, they each of them are very full of people. 3.5. There was also a great slaughter made in the city, while those foreigners that had not fled away already made opposition; but the natural inhabitants were killed without fighting: for in hopes of Titus’s giving them his right hand for their security, and out of a consciousness that they had not given any consent to the war, they avoided fighting 3.6. 3. So Nero esteemed these circumstances as favorable omens, and saw that Vespasian’s age gave him sure experience, and great skill, and that he had his sons as hostages for his fidelity to himself, and that the flourishing age they were in would make them fit instruments under their father’s prudence. Perhaps also there was some interposition of Providence, which was paving the way for Vespasian’s being himself emperor afterwards. 3.6. These last, by marching continually one way or other, and overrunning the parts of the adjoining country, were very troublesome to Josephus and his men; they also plundered all the places that were out of the city’s liberty, and intercepted such as durst go abroad. 3.14. Accordingly, he wrote these things, and sent messengers immediately to carry his letter to Jerusalem. 3.14. but Antonius, who was not unapprised of the attack they were going to make upon the city, drew out his horsemen beforehand, and being neither daunted at the multitude, nor at the courage of the enemy, received their first attacks with great bravery; and when they crowded to the very walls, he beat them off. 3.25. the mountains also contributed to increase the noise by their echoes; nor was there on that night anything of terror wanting that could either affect the hearing or the sight: 3.25. for Antonius laid ambushes for them in the passages they were to go through, where they fell into snares unexpectedly, and where they were encompassed about with horsemen, before they could form themselves into a regular body for fighting, and were above eight thousand of them slain; so all the rest of them ran away, and with them Niger, who still did a great many bold exploits in his flight. However, they were driven along together by the enemy, who pressed hard upon them, into a certain strong tower belonging to a village called Bezedel.
5. Horace, Letters, 1.1, 1.1.1, 1.13, 1.20.20-1.20.22, 1.20.27, 2.1, 2.1.258-2.1.259, 2.2.50-2.2.52, 2.2.60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. 1. Those who undertake to write histories, do not, I perceive, take that trouble on one and the same account, but for many reasons, and those such as are very different one from another. 1.1. 3. I found, therefore, that the second of the Ptolemies was a king who was extraordinarily diligent in what concerned learning, and the collection of books; that he was also peculiarly ambitious to procure a translation of our law, and of the constitution of our government therein contained, into the Greek tongue. 1.1. it being an instance of greater wisdom not to have granted them life at all, than, after it was granted, to procure their destruction; “But the injuries,” said he, “they offered to my holiness and virtue, forced me to bring this punishment upon them. 1.13. while there were a vast number of other matters in our sacred books. They, indeed, contain in them the history of five thousand years; in which time happened many strange accidents, many chances of war, and great actions of the commanders, and mutations of the form of our government. 1.13. 2. The children of Ham possessed the land from Syria and Amanus, and the mountains of Libanus; seizing upon all that was on its sea-coasts, and as far as the ocean, and keeping it as their own. Some indeed of its names are utterly vanished away; others of them being changed, and another sound given them, are hardly to be discovered; yet a few there are which have kept their denominations entire. 2.1. 1. After the death of Isaac, his sons divided their habitations respectively; nor did they retain what they had before; but Esau departed from the city of Hebron, and left it to his brother, and dwelt in Seir, and ruled over Idumea. He called the country by that name from himself, for he was named Adom; which appellation he got on the following occasion:— 2.1. This affection of his father excited the envy and the hatred of his brethren; as did also his dreams which he saw, and related to his father, and to them, which foretold his future happiness, it being usual with mankind to envy their very nearest relations such their prosperity. Now the visions which Joseph saw in his sleep were these:— 2.1. 3. Now these brethren of his were under distraction and terror, and thought that very great danger hung over them; yet not at all reflecting upon their brother Joseph, and standing firm under the accusations laid against them, they made their defense by Reubel, the eldest of them, who now became their spokesman:
6. Horace, Epodes, 4.19, 13.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Horace, Sermones, 1.1-1.5, 1.1.1, 1.1.3, 1.1.15, 1.1.24-1.1.26, 1.1.117-1.1.118, 1.2.33, 1.2.116, 1.2.119, 1.3.137, 1.4.41-1.4.42, 1.4.57, 1.4.78, 1.4.105-1.4.108, 1.4.110-1.4.111, 1.4.115-1.4.116, 1.4.118-1.4.120, 1.4.123, 1.4.133-1.4.136, 1.6.4, 1.6.6, 1.6.45-1.6.49, 1.6.61-1.6.62, 1.6.65-1.6.74, 1.6.87, 1.6.93, 1.6.96, 1.6.112-1.6.115, 1.7-1.10, 1.9.29, 1.9.43-1.9.44, 1.10.48, 1.10.92, 2.1.11-2.1.12, 2.1.21, 2.1.27, 2.1.34, 2.1.36, 2.1.47-2.1.57, 2.1.60, 2.1.67, 2.3, 2.6-2.7, 2.6.30-2.6.31, 2.6.60, 2.6.64, 2.7.44, 2.7.56-2.7.67, 2.7.73, 2.7.83, 2.7.111-2.7.112 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. 1. I suppose that, by my books of the Antiquities of the Jews, most excellent Epaphroditus, I have made it evident to those who peruse them, that our Jewish nation is of very great antiquity, and had a distinct subsistence of its own originally; as also I have therein declared how we came to inhabit this country wherein we now live. Those Antiquities contain the history of five thousand years, and are taken out of our sacred books; but are translated by me into the Greek tongue. 1.1. but as for the place where the Grecians inhabit, ten thousand destructions have overtaken it, and blotted out the memory of former actions; so that they were ever beginning a new way of living, and supposed that every one of them was the origin of their new state. It was also late, and with difficulty, that they came to know the letters they now use; for those who would advance their use of these letters to the greatest antiquity pretend that they learned them from the Phoenicians and from Cadmus; 1.1. but after some considerable time, Armais, who was left in Egypt, did all those very things, by way of opposition, which his brother had forbidden him to do, without fear; for he used violence to the queen, and continued to make use of the rest of the concubines, without sparing any of them; nay, at the persuasion of his friends he put on the diadem, and set up to oppose his brother; 1.2. However, since I observe a considerable number of people giving ear to the reproaches that are laid against us by those who bear ill will to us, and will not believe what I have written concerning the antiquity of our nation, while they take it for a plain sign that our nation is of a late date, because they are not so much as vouchsafed a bare mention by the most famous historiographers among the Grecians 1.2. for if we remember, that in the beginning the Greeks had taken no care to have public records of their several transactions preserved, this must for certain have afforded those that would afterward write about those ancient transactions, the opportunity of making mistakes, and the power of making lies also; 1.2. Moreover, he attests that we Jews, went as auxiliaries along with king Alexander, and after him with his successors. I will add farther what he says he learned when he was himself with the same army, concerning the actions of a man that was a Jew. His words are these:— 1.3. I therefore have thought myself under an obligation to write somewhat briefly about these subjects, in order to convict those that reproach us of spite and voluntary falsehood, and to correct the ignorance of others, and withal to instruct all those who are desirous of knowing the truth of what great antiquity we really are. 1.3. 7. For our forefathers did not only appoint the best of these priests, and those that attended upon the divine worship, for that design from the beginning, but made provision that the stock of the priests should continue unmixed and pure; 1.3. Besides all this, Ramesses, the son of Amenophis, by Manetho’s account, was a young man, and assisted his father in his war, and left the country at the same time with him, and fled into Ethiopia: but Cheremon makes him to have been born in a certain cave, after his father was dead, and that he then overcame the Jews in battle, and drove them into Syria, being in number about two hundred thousand. 1.4. As for the witnesses whom I shall produce for the proof of what I say, they shall be such as are esteemed to be of the greatest reputation for truth, and the most skilful in the knowledge of all antiquity, by the Greeks themselves. I will also show, that those who have written so reproachfully and falsely about us, are to be convicted by what they have written themselves to the contrary. 1.4. but as to the time from the death of Moses till the reign of Artaxerxes, king of Persia, who reigned after Xerxes, the prophets, who were after Moses, wrote down what was done in their times in thirteen books. The remaining four books contain hymns to God, and precepts for the conduct of human life. 1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.7. for they will find, that almost all which concerns the Greeks happened not long ago; nay, one may say, is of yesterday only. I speak of the building of their cities, the invention of their arts, and the description of their laws; and as for their care about the writing down of their histories, it is very near the last thing they set about. 1.7. Now, the very same thing will I endeavor to do; for I will bring the Egyptians and the Phoenicians as my principal witnesses, because nobody can complain of their testimony as false on account that they are known to have borne the greatest ill will towards us,—I mean this as to the Egyptians, in general all of them, while of the Phoenicians it is known the Tyrians have been most of all in the same ill disposition towards us: 1.8. However, they acknowledge themselves so far, that they were the Egyptians, the Chaldeans, and the Phoenicians (for I will not now reckon ourselves among them) that have preserved the memorials of the most ancient and most lasting traditions of mankind; 1.8. When this man had reigned thirteen years, after him reigned another, whose name was Beon, for forty-four years; after him reigned another, called Apachnas, thirty-six years and seven months; after him Apophis reigned sixty-one years, and then Jonias fifty years and one month; 1.9. for almost all these nations inhabit such countries as are least subject to destruction from the world about them; and these also have taken especial care to have nothing omitted of what was [remarkably] done among them; but their history was esteemed sacred, and put into public tables, as written by men of the greatest wisdom they had among them; 1.9. but that, as they were in fear of the Assyrians, who had then the dominion over Asia, they built a city in that country which is now called Judea, and that large enough to contain this great number of men, and called it Jerusalem.” 2.3. for some of his writings contain much the same accusations which the others have laid against us, some things that he hath added are very frigid and contemptible, and for the greatest part of what he says, it is very scurrilous, and, to speak no more than the plain truth, it shows him to be a very unlearned person, and what he lays together looks like the work of a man of very bad morals, and of one no better in his whole life than a mountebank. 2.3. for you see how justly he calls those Egyptians whom he hates, and endeavors to reproach; for had he not deemed Egyptians to be a name of great reproach, he would not have avoided the name of an Egyptian himself; as we know that those who brag of their own countries, value themselves upon the denomination they acquire thereby, and reprove such as unjustly lay claim thereto. 2.6. However, it is not a very easy thing to go over this man’s discourse, nor to know plainly what he means; yet does he seem, amidst a great confusion and disorder in his falsehoods, to produce, in the first place, such things as resemble what we have examined already, and relate to the departure of our forefathers out of Egypt; 2.6. nay, when last of all Caesar had taken Alexandria, she came to that pitch of cruelty, that she declared she had some hope of preserving her affairs still, in case she could kill the Jews, though it were with her own hand; to such a degree of barbarity and perfidiousness had she arrived; and doth any one think that we cannot boast ourselves of any thing, if, as Apion says, this queen did not at a time of famine distribute wheat among us? 2.7. and, in the second place, he accuses those Jews that are inhabitants of Alexandria; as, in the third place, he mixes with these things such accusations as concern the sacred purifications, with the other legal rites used in the temple. /p 2.7. These Egyptians therefore were the authors of these troubles, who not having the constancy of Macedonians, nor the prudence of Grecians, indulged all of them the evil manners of the Egyptians, and continued their ancient hatred against us;
8. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.936-1.938, 2.74, 2.81, 3.113, 3.1028, 3.1066-3.1067, 5.82, 6.58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Vergil, Eclogues, 4-6, 10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.5, 4.1.6-4.1.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Epictetus, Discourses, 3.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Juvenal, Satires, 15.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acervus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 166
actium Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35
alexandrian poetry Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 228
anecdote Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 125
archaic latin poetry Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 25
aristotle Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 166
augustus, policy Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
augustus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35
austerity Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 258
bacchic poetics Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 137
biography, biographical, auto- Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113
bion Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 64
bion of borysthenes Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113, 117
calceus (shoe) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
callimachus, as literary critic Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
callimachus, proverbs Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
callimachus, use of proverbs and popular sayings Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
calpurnius piso frugi, l. Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 258
carmina i–iii Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35
children Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
citizenship Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
clementia Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 138
diatribe Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104, 112, 113, 117, 123
edict of diocletian Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
ennius, tentatively deduced as model Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 103
ennius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7
epic parody and allusion Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 128
epicureanism Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 138
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 64, 102, 103, 125, 128, 156
epigram (literary genre) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
euphemism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 156
exemplum / exempla Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 124
freedmen Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 18, 21, 22, 25, 26, 34, 35, 49, 64, 102, 103, 125, 128
gigantomachy Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 137, 138
golden mean Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 166
heidegger, martin Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 26
homer Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 128
horace, childhood Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7
horace, detractors Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 18, 128
horace, father Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 102, 103, 128
horace, greek poetry /greek models) Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 18
horace, personality Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 49
horace, political poetry / stance Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 34
horace, sabinum Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 34
horace, self-presentation Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 128
horace, social climber Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 22
horace, vocation as a poet' "758.0_399@iambus '15 (pannychis)" Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 228
horace, works, epodes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35
horace, works, satires, arrangements of poems Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 125
horace, works, satires Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35, 64
horace Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399; Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221, 326; Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 258
iambus, proverbs in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
influence, proverbs in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
ingenuitas (free birth) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
jews Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 102
julio-claudian period (authors, dress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
laedere Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 128
laelius augur Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
lebenswahl-motif Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 228
leges de repetundis Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 258
leges sumptuariae Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 258
liberalitas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 258
literary criticism, hellenistic, in iambi Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7, 64, 102, 103, 125, 128, 156, 166
lucretius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 102
macrobius, saturnalia Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
maecenas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 34, 103
matrimonium Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
matrona Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
messalla Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 26
muses Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 228
natorp, paul Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 26
neoteric poetry Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 25
nicholas of cusa Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 18
obscenity Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 156
ofellus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 22
old age Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 128
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
orient, oriental influence Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
paroemiography Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
philippi Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 25
pindar Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 228
plotius tucca Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
pollio, asinius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 26
priamel Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 128
propertius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35
proverbs and popular sayings, and poets self-revelation Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
proverbs and popular sayings Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
pudor Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 137
racine, jean Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 18
realism, alexandrian Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 399
recusatio Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35
satura Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 64
sermo Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 64
sicilian war Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 35
stoicism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 156
stola (dress/robe) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
temples, augustus restoration of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 137, 138
therapy, of the soul Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 112
vates Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 228
venosa Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7
vergil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
verrius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
virgil Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 7
viritane redistribution, uir bonus Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 258
virtue, (personified) virtue' Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 123
virtue, (personified) virtue Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104
vitruvius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
war, punic Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
war, social Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 326
ἀπροσδόκητον Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 128