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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.4.48
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Callimachus, Aetia, 1.19 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 2.119 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.119. elicerem Elicerem N 2 eligerem ABERN 1 exigerem V ( idem a poster. man. in marg. add. in N) ex te cogeremque, ut responderes, nisi vererer ne Herculem ipsum ea, quae pro salute gentium summo labore gessisset, voluptatis causa gessisse diceres. Quae cum dixissem, Habeo, inquit Torquatus, ad quos ista referam, et, quamquam aliquid ipse poteram, tamen invenire malo paratiores. Familiares nostros, credo, Sironem dicis et Philodemum, cum optimos viros, tum homines doctissimos. Recte, inquit, intellegis. Age sane, inquam. sed erat aequius Triarium aliquid de dissensione nostra iudicare. Eiuro, Eiuro Gz. Iuro (Itiro R) inquit adridens, iniquum, hac quidem de re; tu enim ista lenius, levius BENV levius an le- nius incert. in R hic Stoicorum more nos vexat. Tum Triarius: Posthac quidem, inquit, audacius. nam haec ipsa mihi erunt in promptu, quae modo audivi, nec ante aggrediar, quam te ab istis, quos dicis, instructum videro. Quae cum essent dicta, finem fecimus et ambulandi et disputandi. 2.119.  I would press my question and drag an answer from you, were I not afraid lest you should say that Hercules himself in the arduous labours that he wrought for the preservation of mankind was acting for the sake of pleasure!" Here I concluded. "I am at no loss for authorities," said Torquatus, "to whom to refer your arguments. I might be able to do some execution myself, but I prefer to find better equipped champions." "No doubt you allude to our excellent and learned friends Siro and Philodemus." "You are right," he replied. "Very well then," said I; "but it would be fairer to let Triarius pronounce some verdict on our dispute." "I formally object to him as prejudiced," he rejoined with a smile, "at all events on this issue. You have shown us some mercy, but Triarius lays about him like a true Stoic." "Oh," interposed Triarius, "I'll fight more boldly still next time, for I shall have the arguments I have just heard ready to my hand, though I won't attack you till I see you have been armed by the instructors whom you mention." And with these words we brought our promenade and our discussion to an end together.
3. Cicero, In Pisonem, 71, 70 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Letters, 2.1.59, 2.1.112, 2.2.60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Sermones, 1.1.3, 1.2, 1.2.21-1.2.22, 1.3.24, 1.3.114, 1.4.1, 1.4.5, 1.4.22-1.4.23, 1.4.25-1.4.32, 1.4.38-1.4.47, 1.4.49-1.4.63, 1.4.65, 1.4.70-1.4.73, 1.4.78-1.4.79, 1.4.81-1.4.85, 1.4.94, 1.4.103-1.4.106, 1.4.109-1.4.126, 1.6.82-1.6.83, 1.10.26, 1.10.31-1.10.35, 1.10.74-1.10.91, 2.1.34, 2.1.60, 2.2.77-2.2.79 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. However, since I observe a considerable number of people giving ear to the reproaches that are laid against us by those who bear ill will to us, and will not believe what I have written concerning the antiquity of our nation, while they take it for a plain sign that our nation is of a late date, because they are not so much as vouchsafed a bare mention by the most famous historiographers among the Grecians 1.2. for if we remember, that in the beginning the Greeks had taken no care to have public records of their several transactions preserved, this must for certain have afforded those that would afterward write about those ancient transactions, the opportunity of making mistakes, and the power of making lies also; 1.2. Moreover, he attests that we Jews, went as auxiliaries along with king Alexander, and after him with his successors. I will add farther what he says he learned when he was himself with the same army, concerning the actions of a man that was a Jew. His words are these:—
6. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.445-7.462 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.445. Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb
8. Vergil, Eclogues, 6.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.15. a page more dear to Phoebus, than the page
9. Vergil, Georgics, 3.294 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.294. Upseethe in swirling eddies, and disgorge
10. Juvenal, Satires, 3.236-3.259 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Persius, Satires, 3.7-3.14, 3.19, 3.58-3.59 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Persius, Saturae, 3.7-3.14, 3.19, 3.58-3.59 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 9.2.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.2.8.  How much greater is the fire of his words as they stand than if he had said, "You have abused our patience a long time," and "Your plots are all laid bare." We may also ask what cannot be denied, as "Was Gaius Ficiulanius Falcula, I ask you, brought to justice?" Or we may put a question to which it is difficult to reply, as in the common forms, "How is it possible?" "How can that be?
14. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 3.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1524-1525, 1522



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
anger, as “firstâ€\x9d emotion Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
anger, symptoms of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
aristophanes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
armstrong, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 136
authenticity, thematized in satire Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 215
bacchus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
callimachus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91
cicero, prosecution of piso Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
comedy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91, 93
cucchiarelli, andrea Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 136
duquesnay, i. m. le m. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 135
emotion, infection with Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
ennius, tentatively deduced as model Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91, 93
ennius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 136
epic, anger in Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91, 93
fire imagery Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
freudenburg, kirk Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 21, 91, 93
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
horace, father Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
horace, fathers teachings/influence on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 136
horace Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 309
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
inspiration Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91
instita (trimming) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 309
kemp, jerome Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 136
konstan, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
leach, eleanor winsor Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21, 131, 135
libertas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
lucilius, and anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
lucilius, compared with horace, as satirist Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91, 93; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 215; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 135
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40, 215
metonymy Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 309
new comedy Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
notare Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
oberhelman, steven Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 136
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 309
overindulgence, condemned Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
persius, deferral Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 74
persius, virgils influence on Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 74
persius Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 74
philodemus of gadara, accusations of flattery Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
philodemus of gadara, biography Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
philodemus of gadara, relationship with piso Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
piso Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
quirinus Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 135
rudd, niall Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 135
satires (horace), depiction of father-son relationship Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131, 136
satires (horace), literary influences on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
satires (horace), stock characters in Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
schlegel, catherine Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21, 135
sedley, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
sermo, as one-sided Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 215
sermo, horace on Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 215
sermo Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91
sider, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
siro Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 21
stola (dress/robe) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 309
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 91
tsouna(-mckirahan), voula Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 136
word-play (etymological, puns, ambiguity)' Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
word formation Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 309
zetzel, james Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 135, 136