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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.4.111
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.87-1.88 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.87. But as you have not the courage (for I will now address myself to Epicurus in person) to deny that the gods exist, what should hinder you from reckoning as divine the sun, or the world, or some form of ever-living intelligence? 'I have never seen a mind endowed with reason and with purpose,' he replies, 'that was embodied in any but a human form.' Well, but have you ever seen anything like the sun or the moon or the five planets? The sun, limiting his motion by the two extreme points of one orbit, completes his courses yearly. The moon, lit by the sun's rays, achieves this solar path in the space of a month. The five planets, holding the same orbit, but some nearer to and others farther from the earth, from the same starting-points complete the same distances in different periods of time. 1.88. Now, Epicurus, have you ever seen anything like this? Well, then, let us deny the existence of the sun, moon and planets, inasmuch as nothing can exist save that which we have touched or seen. And what of god himself? You have never seen him, have you? Why then do you believe in his existence? On this principle we must sweep aside everything unusual of which history or science informs us. The next thing would be for inland races to refuse to believe in the existence of the sea. How can such narrowness of mind be possible? It follows that, if you had been born in Seriphus and had never left the island, where you had been used to seeing nothing larger than hares and foxes, when lions and panthers were described to you, you would refuse to believe in their existence; and if somebody told you about an elephant, you would actually think that he was making fun of you!
2. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.76. nam ut illa praeteream, quae sunt furoris, futuris K 1 furoris haec ipsa per sese sese V ( exp. 3 ) quam habent levitatem, quae videntur esse mediocria, Iniu/riae Ter. Eun. 59–63 Suspi/ciones i/nimicitiae induciae RV indu/tiae Bellu/m pax rursum! ince/rta haec si tu si tu s sit ut X ( prius t exp. V 3 ) po/stules Ratio/ne certa fa/cere, nihilo plu/s plus add. G 2 agas, Quam si/ des operam, ut cu/m ratione insa/nias. haec inconstantia mutabilitasque mentis quem non ipsa pravitate deterreat? est etiam etiam Man. enim illud, quod in omni perturbatione dicitur, demonstrandum, nullam esse nisi opinabilem, nisi iudicio susceptam, nisi voluntariam. etenim si naturalis amor esset, amor esset ex amorem et K c et amarent omnes et semper amarent et idem amarent, et idem amarent om. H neque alium pudor, alium cogitatio, alium satietas deterreret. etenim ... 26 deterreret H deterret G 1 Ira vero, quae quae -ae in r. V 2 quam diu perturbat animum, dubitationem insaniae non habet, cuius inpulsu imp. KR existit etiam inter fratres tale iurgium:
3. Lucilius Gaius, Fragments, 596, 595 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4. Catullus, Poems, 86 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Letters, 1.1.100, 1.18.13-1.18.14, 1.20.20, 2.1.59, 2.2.50-2.2.51, 2.2.124 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Horace, Epodes, 9.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Horace, Sermones, 1.1.1-1.1.3, 1.1.62, 1.2, 1.2.21-1.2.22, 1.2.42-1.2.43, 1.2.47, 1.2.59-1.2.62, 1.2.78, 1.2.92, 1.2.119, 1.3.24, 1.3.114, 1.4-1.6, 1.4.5, 1.4.22-1.4.23, 1.4.25-1.4.32, 1.4.48-1.4.52, 1.4.70, 1.4.78-1.4.79, 1.4.81-1.4.82, 1.4.85, 1.4.103, 1.4.105-1.4.110, 1.4.112-1.4.129, 1.4.133, 1.5.40, 1.6.6, 1.6.45-1.6.48, 1.6.71-1.6.89, 1.6.96, 1.6.130, 1.7.11-1.7.15, 1.10.26, 1.10.74-1.10.91, 2.1.34-2.1.36, 2.3.307, 2.7.22, 2.7.42, 2.7.59, 2.7.72, 2.7.75, 2.7.83 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. However, since I observe a considerable number of people giving ear to the reproaches that are laid against us by those who bear ill will to us, and will not believe what I have written concerning the antiquity of our nation, while they take it for a plain sign that our nation is of a late date, because they are not so much as vouchsafed a bare mention by the most famous historiographers among the Grecians 1.2. for if we remember, that in the beginning the Greeks had taken no care to have public records of their several transactions preserved, this must for certain have afforded those that would afterward write about those ancient transactions, the opportunity of making mistakes, and the power of making lies also; 1.2. Moreover, he attests that we Jews, went as auxiliaries along with king Alexander, and after him with his successors. I will add farther what he says he learned when he was himself with the same army, concerning the actions of a man that was a Jew. His words are these:— 1.4. As for the witnesses whom I shall produce for the proof of what I say, they shall be such as are esteemed to be of the greatest reputation for truth, and the most skilful in the knowledge of all antiquity, by the Greeks themselves. I will also show, that those who have written so reproachfully and falsely about us, are to be convicted by what they have written themselves to the contrary. 1.4. but as to the time from the death of Moses till the reign of Artaxerxes, king of Persia, who reigned after Xerxes, the prophets, who were after Moses, wrote down what was done in their times in thirteen books. The remaining four books contain hymns to God, and precepts for the conduct of human life. 1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.6. 2. And now, in the first place, I cannot but greatly wonder at those men who suppose that we must attend to none but Grecians, when we are inquiring about the most ancient facts, and must inform ourselves of their truth from them only, while we must not believe ourselves nor other men; for I am convinced that the very reverse is the truth of the case. I mean this,—if we will not be led by vain opinions, but will make inquiry after truth from facts themselves; 1.6. 12. As for ourselves, therefore, we neither inhabit a maritime country, nor do we delight in merchandise, nor in such a mixture with other men as arises from it; but the cities we dwell in are remote from the sea, and having a fruitful country for our habitation, we take pains in cultivating that only. Our principal care of all is this, to educate our children well; and we think it to be the most necessary business of our whole life to observe the laws that have been given us, and to keep those rules of piety that have been delivered down to us.
8. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.74, 2.81, 3.113, 5.82, 6.58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Vergil, Eclogues, 1.44 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.44. or rich cheese pressed for the unthankful town
10. Juvenal, Satires, 3.236-3.259 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.121 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.121. But Heraclides of Tarsus, who was the disciple of Antipater of Tarsus, and Athenodorus both assert that sins are not equal.Again, the Stoics say that the wise man will take part in politics, if nothing hinders him – so, for instance, Chrysippus in the first book of his work On Various Types of Life – since thus he will restrain vice and promote virtue. Also (they maintain) he will marry, as Zeno says in his Republic, and beget children. Moreover, they say that the wise man will never form mere opinions, that is to say, he will never give assent to anything that is false; that he will also play the Cynic, Cynicism being a short cut to virtue, as Apollodorus calls it in his Ethics; that he will even turn cannibal under stress of circumstances. They declare that he alone is free and bad men are slaves, freedom being power of independent action, whereas slavery is privation of the same;


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, objections to Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298
adultery Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 80, 93
adultery mimes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 80
aristophanes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
armstrong, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67, 141
asmis, elizabeth Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 141
bacchus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
biography, biographical, auto- Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113
bion of borysthenes Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113
catullus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 80
cercidas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 80
cicero Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
comedy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
contentment, theme of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 214
courtney, edward Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 132, 298
de lacy, estelle Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
de lacy, phillip Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
dewitt, norman Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
diatribe Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 113, 122
empirical observation, role in horaces education/poetry Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
ennius, tentatively deduced as model Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 80, 93, 102, 139
euphemism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
fable Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
fate' Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 122
fish, jeffrey Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 132
freudenburg, kirk Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131, 132
galen of pergamum Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 53, 80, 93, 102, 139
gigante, marcello Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
gowers, emily Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
hall, clayton Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
heinze, richard Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 132
hendrickson, g. l. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
homer, iliad Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 141
horace, (alleged) sexual practices Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298
horace, father Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93, 102
horace, fathers teachings/influence on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
horace, life, as reflected /constructed in horaces works Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
horace, life Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
horace, vita horatii Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
hunter, r. l. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 132
identification in place of simile Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
jews Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 102
kiessling, adolf Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 132
konstan, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
körte, alfred Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
leach, eleanor winsor Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131, 132
libertas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
lucilius, compared with horace, as satirist Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 80, 93, 102, 139
lucretius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 102; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 141
maecenas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
mcosker, michael Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
menander Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 132, 141
new comedy Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
notare Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
ofellus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 53
pasquali, giorgio Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
persona of horace, criticised by interlocutors Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298
persona of horace, self-deprecation/self-parody Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 132
philippson, robert Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
philodemus of gadara, influence on horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8, 67
philodemus of gadara Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 80; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
piso Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 141
plaza, maria Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298
ponczoch, joseph a. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 141
rostagni, augusto Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
sabine estate (gifted to horace by maecenas) Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 214
sallmann, klaus Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
satires (horace), depiction of father-son relationship Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131, 132
satires (horace), literary influences on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131, 132
satires (horace), stock characters in Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8, 131
satires (horace), studies Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8
sexual activity, dangers of excess/irresponsibility Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 150
suetonius, life of horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 298
suetonius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 2
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
titus albucius Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 141
ulysses, portrayal in satires Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 214
varius Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 141
wilke, karl Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 67
word-play (etymological, puns, ambiguity) Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
wright, f. a. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 8