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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.2


nanHowever, since I observe a considerable number of people giving ear to the reproaches that are laid against us by those who bear ill will to us, and will not believe what I have written concerning the antiquity of our nation, while they take it for a plain sign that our nation is of a late date, because they are not so much as vouchsafed a bare mention by the most famous historiographers among the Grecians


nanfor if we remember, that in the beginning the Greeks had taken no care to have public records of their several transactions preserved, this must for certain have afforded those that would afterward write about those ancient transactions, the opportunity of making mistakes, and the power of making lies also;


nanMoreover, he attests that we Jews, went as auxiliaries along with king Alexander, and after him with his successors. I will add farther what he says he learned when he was himself with the same army, concerning the actions of a man that was a Jew. His words are these:—


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 11.218, 14.508 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

11.218. /and the Argives over against them made strong their battalions. And the battle was set in array, and they stood over against each other, and among them Agamemnon rushed forth the first, and was minded to fight far in advance of all.Tell me now, ye Muses, that have dwellings on Olympus, who it was that first came to face Agamemnon
2. Callimachus, Epigrams, 27 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Callimachus, Epigrams, 27 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Callimachus, Iambi, 1.78-1.79 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Catullus, Poems, 86 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Horace, Odes, 3.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.14. Accordingly, he wrote these things, and sent messengers immediately to carry his letter to Jerusalem. 3.14. but Antonius, who was not unapprised of the attack they were going to make upon the city, drew out his horsemen beforehand, and being neither daunted at the multitude, nor at the courage of the enemy, received their first attacks with great bravery; and when they crowded to the very walls, he beat them off.
7. Horace, Letters, 1.14.37, 1.20, 2.2.48-2.2.52, 2.2.60, 2.2.65-2.2.80, 2.2.93, 2.2.97-2.2.101, 2.2.112, 2.2.115-2.2.125 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Horace, Epodes, 14.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Horace, Sermones, 1.1, 1.1.1-1.1.3, 1.1.15, 1.1.38, 1.2.33, 1.2.47-1.2.48, 1.2.59-1.2.63, 1.2.78, 1.2.116-1.2.117, 1.3-1.10, 1.3.4, 1.3.77, 1.3.82, 1.3.98-1.3.99, 1.3.109, 1.3.111, 1.3.114-1.3.115, 1.3.126, 1.4.3, 1.4.5-1.4.6, 1.4.22, 1.4.28-1.4.31, 1.4.38-1.4.39, 1.4.43-1.4.44, 1.4.48-1.4.49, 1.4.65, 1.4.71-1.4.73, 1.4.78, 1.4.81-1.4.82, 1.4.85, 1.4.103, 1.4.105-1.4.106, 1.4.108, 1.4.111, 1.4.113-1.4.116, 1.4.128-1.4.129, 1.4.135, 1.5.40, 1.6.25, 1.6.49, 1.6.61-1.6.70, 1.6.93, 1.6.96, 1.6.112-1.6.115, 1.9.43-1.9.44, 1.10.26, 1.10.44-1.10.45, 1.10.79-1.10.80, 1.10.85, 1.10.92, 2.1.39, 2.1.48-2.1.56, 2.2.116-2.2.117, 2.6.30-2.6.31, 2.6.60, 2.6.64, 2.7-2.8, 2.7.44, 2.7.56-2.7.67, 2.7.73, 2.7.83, 2.7.111-2.7.112 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. 1. I suppose that, by my books of the Antiquities of the Jews, most excellent Epaphroditus, I have made it evident to those who peruse them, that our Jewish nation is of very great antiquity, and had a distinct subsistence of its own originally; as also I have therein declared how we came to inhabit this country wherein we now live. Those Antiquities contain the history of five thousand years, and are taken out of our sacred books; but are translated by me into the Greek tongue. 1.1. but as for the place where the Grecians inhabit, ten thousand destructions have overtaken it, and blotted out the memory of former actions; so that they were ever beginning a new way of living, and supposed that every one of them was the origin of their new state. It was also late, and with difficulty, that they came to know the letters they now use; for those who would advance their use of these letters to the greatest antiquity pretend that they learned them from the Phoenicians and from Cadmus; 1.1. but after some considerable time, Armais, who was left in Egypt, did all those very things, by way of opposition, which his brother had forbidden him to do, without fear; for he used violence to the queen, and continued to make use of the rest of the concubines, without sparing any of them; nay, at the persuasion of his friends he put on the diadem, and set up to oppose his brother; 1.3. I therefore have thought myself under an obligation to write somewhat briefly about these subjects, in order to convict those that reproach us of spite and voluntary falsehood, and to correct the ignorance of others, and withal to instruct all those who are desirous of knowing the truth of what great antiquity we really are. 1.3. 7. For our forefathers did not only appoint the best of these priests, and those that attended upon the divine worship, for that design from the beginning, but made provision that the stock of the priests should continue unmixed and pure; 1.3. Besides all this, Ramesses, the son of Amenophis, by Manetho’s account, was a young man, and assisted his father in his war, and left the country at the same time with him, and fled into Ethiopia: but Cheremon makes him to have been born in a certain cave, after his father was dead, and that he then overcame the Jews in battle, and drove them into Syria, being in number about two hundred thousand. 1.4. As for the witnesses whom I shall produce for the proof of what I say, they shall be such as are esteemed to be of the greatest reputation for truth, and the most skilful in the knowledge of all antiquity, by the Greeks themselves. I will also show, that those who have written so reproachfully and falsely about us, are to be convicted by what they have written themselves to the contrary. 1.4. but as to the time from the death of Moses till the reign of Artaxerxes, king of Persia, who reigned after Xerxes, the prophets, who were after Moses, wrote down what was done in their times in thirteen books. The remaining four books contain hymns to God, and precepts for the conduct of human life. 1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.6. 2. And now, in the first place, I cannot but greatly wonder at those men who suppose that we must attend to none but Grecians, when we are inquiring about the most ancient facts, and must inform ourselves of their truth from them only, while we must not believe ourselves nor other men; for I am convinced that the very reverse is the truth of the case. I mean this,—if we will not be led by vain opinions, but will make inquiry after truth from facts themselves; 1.6. 12. As for ourselves, therefore, we neither inhabit a maritime country, nor do we delight in merchandise, nor in such a mixture with other men as arises from it; but the cities we dwell in are remote from the sea, and having a fruitful country for our habitation, we take pains in cultivating that only. Our principal care of all is this, to educate our children well; and we think it to be the most necessary business of our whole life to observe the laws that have been given us, and to keep those rules of piety that have been delivered down to us. 1.7. for they will find, that almost all which concerns the Greeks happened not long ago; nay, one may say, is of yesterday only. I speak of the building of their cities, the invention of their arts, and the description of their laws; and as for their care about the writing down of their histories, it is very near the last thing they set about. 1.7. Now, the very same thing will I endeavor to do; for I will bring the Egyptians and the Phoenicians as my principal witnesses, because nobody can complain of their testimony as false on account that they are known to have borne the greatest ill will towards us,—I mean this as to the Egyptians, in general all of them, while of the Phoenicians it is known the Tyrians have been most of all in the same ill disposition towards us: 1.8. However, they acknowledge themselves so far, that they were the Egyptians, the Chaldeans, and the Phoenicians (for I will not now reckon ourselves among them) that have preserved the memorials of the most ancient and most lasting traditions of mankind; 1.8. When this man had reigned thirteen years, after him reigned another, whose name was Beon, for forty-four years; after him reigned another, called Apachnas, thirty-six years and seven months; after him Apophis reigned sixty-one years, and then Jonias fifty years and one month; 1.9. for almost all these nations inhabit such countries as are least subject to destruction from the world about them; and these also have taken especial care to have nothing omitted of what was [remarkably] done among them; but their history was esteemed sacred, and put into public tables, as written by men of the greatest wisdom they had among them; 1.9. but that, as they were in fear of the Assyrians, who had then the dominion over Asia, they built a city in that country which is now called Judea, and that large enough to contain this great number of men, and called it Jerusalem.” 2.7. and, in the second place, he accuses those Jews that are inhabitants of Alexandria; as, in the third place, he mixes with these things such accusations as concern the sacred purifications, with the other legal rites used in the temple. /p 2.7. These Egyptians therefore were the authors of these troubles, who not having the constancy of Macedonians, nor the prudence of Grecians, indulged all of them the evil manners of the Egyptians, and continued their ancient hatred against us; 2.8. 2. Now, although I cannot but think that I have already demonstrated, and that abundantly, more than was necessary, that our fathers were not originally Egyptians, nor were thence expelled, either on account of bodily diseases, or any other calamities of that sort 2.8. for Apion hath the impudence to pretend, that “the Jews placed an ass’s head in their holy place;” and he affirms that this was discovered when Antiochus Epiphanes spoiled our temple, and found that ass’s head there made of gold, and worth a great deal of money.
10. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.1066-3.1067, 5.735, 5.797, 5.822, 5.932, 5.1029, 5.1097 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Propertius, Elegies, 4.11 (1st cent. BCE

12. Vergil, Aeneis, 8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Vergil, Eclogues, 4-6, 10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14. Vergil, Georgics, 3.3-3.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song
15. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.5, 4.1.6-4.1.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16. Juvenal, Satires, 15.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Martial, Epigrams, 3.33, 6.66, 10.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Martial, Epigrams, 3.33, 6.66, 10.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Statius, Thebais, 4.829-4.830 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Suetonius, Augustus, 34 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Tacitus, Annals, 2.85 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.85.  In the same year, bounds were set to female profligacy by stringent resolutions of the senate; and it was laid down that no woman should trade in her body, if her father, grandfather, or husband had been a Roman knight. For Vistilia, the daughter of a praetorian family, had advertised her venality on the aediles' list — the normal procedure among our ancestors, who imagined the unchaste to be sufficiently punished by the avowal of their infamy. Her husband, Titidius Labeo, was also required to explain why, in view of his wife's manifest guilt, he had not invoked the penalty of the law. As he pleaded that sixty days, not yet elapsed, were allowed for deliberation, it was thought enough to pass sentence on Vistilia, who was removed to the island of Seriphos. — Another debate dealt with the proscription of the Egyptian and Jewish rites, and a senatorial edict directed that four thousand descendants of enfranchised slaves, tainted with that superstition and suitable in point of age, were to be shipped to Sardinia and there employed in suppressing brigandage: "if they succumbed to the pestilential climate, it was a cheap loss." The rest had orders to leave Italy, unless they had renounced their impious ceremonial by a given date.
22. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 33, 37, 31



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, roman Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 392
adultery Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 85, 93
adultery (adulterium) not applicable to freedwomen Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 139
alliteration Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 99
anadema (headband) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287
anecdote Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 125, 474
aristotle Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 90
augustan legislation, and societal expectations Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113
augustan legislation, gender disparity Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113, 114
augustan legislation Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113, 114
augustus, policy Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
augustus Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
aurelius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
bacchus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93
bion of borysthenes Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 114
boys as sexual objects Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 90
calceus (shoe) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
callimachus, flavian reception of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
callimachus, λεπτότης in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
callimachus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 90
caltula (gloss) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287
career, literary, satiric careers Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
career, literary Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
children Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
cicero Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
cinara Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 54
citizenship Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
citizenship (roman) limitations on Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 179
comedy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93, 155
dannunzio, gabriele Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 54
diatribe Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 101, 104, 108, 112, 114, 119, 121, 122, 123
diction, low Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 155
diminutives Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 533
divorcées, remarriage of Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 114
eclogues Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 169
edict of diocletian Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
elegy Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
ennius, tentatively deduced as model Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 73, 93
epic parody and allusion Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 99
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 72, 73, 85, 87, 90, 93, 95, 96, 99, 124, 125, 155, 156
epigram (literary genre) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
epitaph language Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 73
euphemism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 156
fate Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 122
freedwomen, power of patron over Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113, 114
furius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24, 52, 54, 55, 72, 73, 85, 87, 90, 93, 95, 96, 99, 124, 125
gender, double standard Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113, 114
goethe, johann wolfgang von, marienbader elegie Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 55
goethe, johann wolfgang von Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 54
golden mean Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 73
grecisms Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 73
horace, father Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93, 95, 96
horace, love poetry Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 55
horace, poem structure Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 474
horace, political poetry / stance Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 55
horace, scriba Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
horace, sex life Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 52
horace, works, epodes, chronology Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 169
horace, works, epodes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 169
horace, works, satires, arrangements of poems Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 95, 125
horace Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7; Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221, 287
indirect approach Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 72, 155
inspiration Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 474
intusium/indusium Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287
julio-claudian period (authors, dress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221, 329
laedere Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 96
langia Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
latin love elegy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 54
lex julia de adulteriis coercendis, gender and status distinctions Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 114
lex julia de maritandis ordinibus Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 114
libertas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93, 95
literary feuds Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 96
literature, augustan poets Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113, 114
livia (empress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 72, 73, 85, 87, 90, 93, 95, 96, 99, 124, 125, 155, 156
lucretius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 85; Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287
luxury Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287
lyric poetry Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
macrobius, saturnalia Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
maecenas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24, 87, 169; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
marriage, social expectation of Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113
martial, and catullus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
martial, and statius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
martial, influence of callimachus on Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
martial, window allusions in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 352
matrimonium Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
matrona Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221, 287
matrons (matronae) Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 147
matrons (matronae) as archetypal citizens Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 139
matrons (matronae) distinguished from freedwomen Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 139, 140, 147
messalla Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24, 124
mother, motherhood Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
mozart, wolfgang amadeus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 55
muses Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 99
notare Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93, 96
obscenity Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 85, 156, 533; Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287, 329
oracular language Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 72, 73
palla Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287
papian-poppaean law Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 114
patagiata (gloss) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 287
persius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
philippi Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
pindar Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 474
pliny the younger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 7
plotius tucca Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 101, 104
pollio, asinius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
priapus Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 392
propertius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
prostitution/prostitutes Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 140, 147
prostitution/prostitutes as appropriate sexual partners Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 139
quintilius Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 101
remarriage, augustan law Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 114
ring-composition Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 124
satire, hexameter Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 391, 392
sexualization of freedwomen' Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 140
sexualization of freedwomen Perry, Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman (2014) 139, 147
siro Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 125
social status, and augustan laws Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113, 114
socrates Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 125
soul Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 119
sources, secondary Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
stoicism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 72, 85, 156
stola (dress/robe) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 73
terenceadelphoe Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 116
therapy, of the soul Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 112
tibullus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
trebonius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 95
univira ideal Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 114
varius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
vergil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
vetula-skoptik Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 54
virgil Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 24
virtue, (personified) virtue Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 104, 119, 123
vitruvius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 221
war, civil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
war, punic Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
war, social Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 329
widows, remarriage Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 114
women, as target of legislation Huebner and Laes, Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae' (2019) 113, 114
word-play (etymological, puns, ambiguity) Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 93