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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6707
Horace, Sermones, 1.10.81
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

25 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 19 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 19 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homer, Iliad, 3.28, 18.535 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.28. /when he is hungry; for greedily doth he devour it, even though swift dogs and lusty youths set upon him: even so was Menelaus glad when his eyes beheld godlike Alexander; for he thought that he had gotten him vengeance on the sinner. And forthwith he leapt in his armour from his chariot to the ground. 18.535. /And amid them Strife and Tumult joined in the fray, and deadly Fate, grasping one man alive, fresh-wounded, another without a wound, and another she dragged dead through the mellay by the feet; and the raiment that she had about her shoulders was red with the blood of men. Even as living mortals joined they in the fray and fought;
4. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.985-1.1011, 1.1030-1.1033 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.985. ἠοῖ δʼ εἰσανέβαν μέγα Δίνδυμον, ὄφρα καὶ αὐτοὶ 1.986. θηήσαιντο πόρους κείνης ἁλός· ἐκ δʼ ἄρα τοίγε 1.987. νῆα Χυτοῦ λιμένος προτέρω ἐξήλασαν ὅρμον· 1.988. ἥδε δʼ Ἰησονίη πέφαται ὁδός, ἥνπερ ἔβησαν. 1.989. Γηγενέες δʼ ἑτέρωθεν ἀπʼ οὔρεος ἀίξαντες 1.990. φράξαν ἀπειρεσίοιο Χυτοῦ στόμα νειόθι πέτρῃς 1.991. πόντιον, οἷά τε θῆρα λοχώμενοι ἔνδον ἐόντα. 1.992. ἀλλὰ γὰρ αὖθι λέλειπτο σὺν ἀνδράσιν ὁπλοτέροισιν 1.993. Ἡρακλέης, ὃς δή σφι παλίντονον αἶψα τανύσσας 1.994. τόξον ἐπασσυτέρους πέλασε χθονί· τοὶ δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ 1.995. πέτρας ἀμφιρρῶγας ἀερτάζοντες ἔβαλλον. 1.996. δὴ γάρ που κἀκεῖνα θεὰ τρέφεν αἰνὰ πέλωρα 1.997. Ἥρη, Ζηνὸς ἄκοιτις, ἀέθλιον Ἡρακλῆι. 1.998. σὺν δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι δῆθεν ὑπότροποι ἀντιόωντες 1.999. πρίν περ ἀνελθέμεναι σκοπιήν, ἥπτοντο φόνοιο 1.1000. γηγενέων ἥρωες ἀρήιοι, ἠμὲν ὀιστοῖς 1.1001. ἠδὲ καὶ ἐγχείῃσι δεδεγμένοι, εἰσόκε πάντας 1.1002. ἀντιβίην ἀσπερχὲς ὀρινομένους ἐδάιξαν. 1.1003. ὡς δʼ ὅτε δούρατα μακρὰ νέον πελέκεσσι τυπέντα 1.1004. ὑλοτόμοι στοιχηδὸν ἐπὶ ῥηγμῖνι βάλωσιν 1.1005. ὄφρα νοτισθέντα κρατεροὺς ἀνεχοίατο γόμφους· 1.1006. ὧς οἱ ἐνὶ ξυνοχῇ λιμένος πολιοῖο τέταντο 1.1007. ἑξείης, ἄλλοι μὲν ἐς ἁλμυρὸν ἀθρόοι ὕδωρ 1.1008. δύπτοντες κεφαλὰς καὶ στήθεα, γυῖα δʼ ὕπερθεν 1.1009. χέρσῳ τεινάμενοι· τοὶ δʼ ἔμπαλιν, αἰγιαλοῖο 1.1010. κράατα μὲν ψαμάθοισι, πόδας δʼ εἰς βένθος ἔρειδον 1.1011. ἄμφω ἅμʼ οἰωνοῖσι καὶ ἰχθύσι κύρμα γενέσθαι. 1.1030. οὐδʼ ὅγε δηιοτῆτος ὑπὲρ μόρον αὖτις ἔμελλεν 1.1031. οἴκαδε νυμφιδίους θαλάμους καὶ λέκτρον ἱκέσθαι. 1.1032. ἀλλά μιν Λἰσονίδης τετραμμένον ἰθὺς ἑοῖο 1.1033. πλῆξεν ἐπαΐξας στῆθος μέσον, ἀμφὶ δὲ δουρὶ
5. Plautus, Amphitruo, 74-95, 73 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6. Plautus, Captiui, 11-14, 10 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

7. Plautus, Poenulus, 10-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-43, 5-9, 1 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

8. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.34. Nor was his fellow-pupil Xenocrates any wiser on this subject. His volumes On the Nature of the Gods give no intelligible account of the divine form; for he states that there are eight gods: five inhabiting the planets, and in a state of motion; one consisting of all the fixed stars, which are to be regarded as separate members constituting a single deity; seventh he adds the sun, and eighth the moon. But what sensation of bliss these things can enjoy it is impossible to conceive. Another member of the school of Plato, Heracleides of Pontus, filled volume after volume with childish fictions; at one moment he deems the world divine, at another the intellect; he also assigns divinity to the planets, and holds that the deity is devoid of sensation and mutable of form; and again in the same volume he reckons earth and sky as gods.
9. Cicero, De Oratore, 2.25 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.25. Nam, quod addidisti tertium, vos esse eos, qui vitam insuavem sine his studiis putaretis, id me non modo non hortatur ad disputandum, sed etiam deterret. Nam ut C. Lucilius, homo doctus et perurbanus, dicere solebat ea, quae scriberet neque se ab indoctissimis neque a doctissimis legi velle, quod alteri nihil intellegerent, alteri plus fortasse quam ipse; de quo etiam scripsit "Persium non curo legere,"—hic fuit enim, ut noramus, omnium fere nostrorum hominum doctissimus—"Laelium Decumum volo," quem cognovimus virum bonum et non inlitteratum, sed nihil ad Persium; sic ego, si iam mihi disputandum sit de his nostris studiis, nolim equidem apud rusticos, sed multo minus apud vos; malo enim non intellegi orationem meam quam reprehendi.'
10. Philodemus, De Oeconomia, 23.23-23.30 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Horace, Ars Poetica, 54-55, 53 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Horace, Odes, 1.1, 1.1.1, 1.3.8, 1.6, 1.24.5-1.24.7, 2.17.5, 3.29.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. 1. Whereas the war which the Jews made with the Romans hath been the greatest of all those, not only that have been in our times, but, in a manner, of those that ever were heard of; both of those wherein cities have fought against cities, or nations against nations; while some men who were not concerned in the affairs themselves have gotten together vain and contradictory stories by hearsay, and have written them down after a sophistical manner; 1.1. For that it was a seditious temper of our own that destroyed it; and that they were the tyrants among the Jews who brought the Roman power upon us, who unwillingly attacked us, and occasioned the burning of our holy temple; Titus Caesar, who destroyed it, is himself a witness, who, during the entire war, pitied the people who were kept under by the seditious, and did often voluntarily delay the taking of the city, and allowed time to the siege, in order to let the authors have opportunity for repentance. 1.1. But still he was not able to exclude Antiochus, for he burnt the towers, and filled up the trenches, and marched on with his army. And as he looked upon taking his revenge on Alexander, for endeavoring to stop him, as a thing of less consequence, he marched directly against the Arabians 1.6. I thought it therefore an absurd thing to see the truth falsified in affairs of such great consequence, and to take no notice of it; but to suffer those Greeks and Romans that were not in the wars to be ignorant of these things, and to read either flatteries or fictions, while the Parthians, and the Babylonians, and the remotest Arabians, and those of our nation beyond Euphrates, with the Adiabeni, by my means, knew accurately both whence the war begun, what miseries it brought upon us, and after what manner it ended. 1.6. And as the siege was delayed by this means, the year of rest came on, upon which the Jews rest every seventh year as they do on every seventh day. On this year, therefore, Ptolemy was freed from being besieged, and slew the brethren of John, with their mother, and fled to Zeno, who was also called Cotylas, who was the tyrant of Philadelphia. 1.6. Whereupon the king avenged this insolent attempt of the mother upon her son, and blotted Herod, whom he had by her, out of his testament, who had been before named therein as successor to Antipater.
14. Horace, Letters, 2.1.59, 2.1.215, 2.1.245-2.1.250 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15. Horace, Sermones, 1.1.1, 1.1.6, 1.1.9, 1.2.21-1.2.22, 1.3.24, 1.4.22-1.4.23, 1.4.25-1.4.32, 1.4.48-1.4.52, 1.4.70, 1.4.78-1.4.79, 1.4.109-1.4.126, 1.4.133, 1.4.135-1.4.136, 1.5, 1.5.28-1.5.29, 1.5.39-1.5.44, 1.5.93, 1.6.1-1.6.5, 1.6.18, 1.6.51-1.6.52, 1.6.54-1.6.55, 1.6.111-1.6.131, 1.9, 1.9.22-1.9.23, 1.9.25, 1.10.36-1.10.50, 1.10.53-1.10.54, 1.10.57, 1.10.59, 1.10.63-1.10.80, 1.10.82-1.10.92, 2.1.11, 2.1.82-2.1.86, 2.8.20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.5. I shall also endeavor to give an account of the reasons why it hath so happened, that there hath not been a great number of Greeks who have made mention of our nation in their histories. I will, however, bring those Grecians to light who have not omitted such our history, for the sake of those that either do not know them, or pretend not to know them already. /p 1.5. Afterward I got leisure at Rome; and when all my materials were prepared for that work, I made use of some persons to assist me in learning the Greek tongue, and by these means I composed the history of those transactions; and I was so well assured of the truth of what I related, that I first of all appealed to those that had the supreme command in that war, Vespasian and Titus, as witnesses for me 1.9. for almost all these nations inhabit such countries as are least subject to destruction from the world about them; and these also have taken especial care to have nothing omitted of what was [remarkably] done among them; but their history was esteemed sacred, and put into public tables, as written by men of the greatest wisdom they had among them; 1.9. but that, as they were in fear of the Assyrians, who had then the dominion over Asia, they built a city in that country which is now called Judea, and that large enough to contain this great number of men, and called it Jerusalem.”
16. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.7-2.13, 3.1060-3.1067 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 10.710-10.723 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Propertius, Elegies, 2.34, 2.34.89 (1st cent. BCE

19. Vergil, Aeneis, 10.730 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.730. in mortal shade; Serestus bore away
20. Vergil, Eclogues, 9.32-9.36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.32. to Amaryllis wending, our hearts' joy?—
21. Vergil, Georgics, 1.24-1.42, 4.561-4.562 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.24. Minerva, from whose hand the olive sprung; 1.25. And boy-discoverer of the curved plough; 1.26. And, bearing a young cypress root-uptorn 1.27. Silvanus, and Gods all and Goddesses 1.28. Who make the fields your care, both ye who nurse 1.29. The tender unsown increase, and from heaven 1.30. Shed on man's sowing the riches of your rain: 1.31. And thou, even thou, of whom we know not yet 1.32. What mansion of the skies shall hold thee soon 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.34. Great Caesar, and to take the earth in charge 1.35. That so the mighty world may welcome thee 1.36. Lord of her increase, master of her times 1.37. Binding thy mother's myrtle round thy brow 1.38. Or as the boundless ocean's God thou come 1.39. Sole dread of seamen, till far placeName key= 1.40. Before thee, and Tethys win thee to her son 1.41. With all her waves for dower; or as a star 1.42. Lend thy fresh beams our lagging months to cheer 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing
22. Juvenal, Satires, 3.236-3.259 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.324-1.335 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24. Seneca The Younger, Thyestes, 226 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accius (tragic poet and scholar), atreus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
acron Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
actian games Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
adonis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61, 119
agrippa Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 97
alexandrian, footnote Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
ancient novel, readers of Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
anderson, w. s. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 16
anti-epicurean polemics Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
aphrodite Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
apuleius metamorphoses, readers of Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
arcadia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
arethusa Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
aristophanes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
armstrong, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 16, 81, 159
asmis, elizabeth Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 159
atreus (mythical king) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220, 227
augustus, and revenge Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
augustus, as legal authority Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 68
augustus, res gestae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
augustus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
bion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
bond, r. p. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6
brutus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 123
cacus (giant) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
camp Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
canon Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382, 383
capasso, mario Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 16
cato (valerius) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
catullus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 123; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 166
cicero Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382
class (social) Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
contentment, theme of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81
courtney, edward Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81, 225
cupid and psyche Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
cèbe, j.-p. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81
damon, cynthia Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 199
della corte, francesco Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 16
dido Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
drinking / drinking parties Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
effeminacy Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
elegy, pastoral Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
epic poetry Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 97, 123
epicurus (and epicurean) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
euphorion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
feeney, denis Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6
ferriss-hill, jennifer Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 16
fiske, g. c. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81
flattery Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 196, 199, 200
fraenkel, eduard Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 166
frankness Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 159
freudenburg, kirk Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
friends/friendship, instrumentality of Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
friends/friendship Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
friendship, epicurean understandings Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 159
friendship, three levels of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 159
fuga dal servilismo Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 97, 123
heinze, richard Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 131, 200
horace, circle of friends Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 199, 200
horace, fathers teachings/influence on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 159
horace Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382, 383; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
horace (poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220, 227
hunt(ing) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
income Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
insult / mockery / ridicule Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
jealousy (ζηλοτυπία) Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
konstan, david Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81, 131
körte, alfred Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 16
laughter Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
leach, eleanor winsor Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
lex pedia Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
libraries Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382
lions Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
literary feuds Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 123
lucan Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
lucilius, compared with horace, as satirist Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
lucilius, possible representation in satires Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 196
lucilius Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122; Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 97, 123
lucretius, compared with horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81
lucretius, on the nature of things Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 77, 81
lucretius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
lycoris Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
maecenas, literary circle Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 199, 200
maecenas, personal qualities of (according to horace) Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 199, 200
maecenas, positioning in horaces audience Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 77
maecenas, relationship with horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 166
maecenas, works addressed/dedicated to Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 159
maecenas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 97; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6
maecenas (patron) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
mark antony Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
mars ultor Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
mcneill, randall Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6
messalla Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 123
michels, agnes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 159
muecke, frances Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
new comedy Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
octavian Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 97
octavian (later emperor augustus) Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6
octavius musa Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 67, 68
openness/closedness Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382
ovid Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382, 383
parody Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
pastoral, and elegy Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
patronage Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 166
performance Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
persona of horace, epicurean basis Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 81
petronius Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
philodemus, life Allison, Saving One Another: Philodemus and Paul on Moral Formation in Community (2020) 32
philodemus of gadara, influence on horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 77, 159
philodemus of gadara Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 97, 123
plato and platonism Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
pliny the elder Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382
plotius Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
plotius tucca Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 99; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 16, 200
pollio, gaius asinius Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 67, 68
pompey Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
poor epicureans Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
propertius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
prostitution Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
quintilius' Konstan and Garani, The Philosophizing Muse: The Influence of Greek Philosophy on Roman Poetry (2014) 99
qunitilian Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 16
real world\n, inclusion/exclusion in Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382
res gestae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
safety Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
satire Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192; Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
satires (horace), comparisons between Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 200
satires (horace), depiction of father-son relationship Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131, 159
satires (horace), literary influences on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 77, 131
satires (horace), presentation of author-figure in Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81
satires (horace), stock characters in Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 131
satires (horace), target audience Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 77
satires (horace), treatment of relationship with maecenas Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 166
saturn Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
seneca (philosopher and poet), thyestes Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220, 227
sicily Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
sileni Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
slander Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
slaves / slavery Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 192
socrates (philosopher) Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 122
sophocles, dramas by\n, tereus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 227
statues Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382
suetonius, life of horace Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 77, 166
theognis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
thyestes Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
tigers Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
titus albucius, contrasted with author-figure Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 199
titus albucius, toady, figure of Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 196, 199, 200
trebatius testa Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 68
tsouna(-mckirahan), voula Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 196
turnus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
underworld Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 61
usener, hermann Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81
varius Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 16, 196
varius rufus (poet), de morte Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
varius rufus (poet), paid by augustus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
varius rufus (poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
varro, m. terentius Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 382
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 119; Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 16
vergil Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 6, 16, 77, 159, 196
virgil Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 383; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
virgil (poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 220
wealthy epicureans Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 208
wimmel, walter Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 81