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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6704
Horace, Odes, 2.1.37-2.1.40
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Horace, Odes, 1.2.41, 4.4, 4.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.4. Now Agrippa had united Sogana and Seleucia by leagues to himself, at the very beginning of the revolt from the Romans; yet did not Gamala accede to them, but relied upon the difficulty of the place, which was greater than that of Jotapata 4.4. As to what concerned himself, he avoided to say anything, that he might by no means seem to complain of it; but he said that “we ought to bear manfully what usually falls out in war, and this, by considering what the nature of war is, and how it can never be that we must conquer without bloodshed on our own side; for there stands about us that fortune which is of its own nature mutable; 4.4. Those that were called Sicarii had taken possession of it formerly, but at this time they overran the neighboring countries, aiming only to procure to themselves necessaries; for the fear they were then in prevented their further ravages. 4.14. Now at this time it was that as king Agrippa was come nigh the walls, and was endeavoring to speak to those that were on the walls about a surrender, he was hit with a stone on his right elbow by one of the slingers; 4.14. for the first man they meddled with was Antipas, one of the royal lineage, and the most potent man in the whole city, insomuch that the public treasures were committed to his care;
2. Horace, Letters, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.1. 1. After the death of Isaac, his sons divided their habitations respectively; nor did they retain what they had before; but Esau departed from the city of Hebron, and left it to his brother, and dwelt in Seir, and ruled over Idumea. He called the country by that name from himself, for he was named Adom; which appellation he got on the following occasion:— 2.1. This affection of his father excited the envy and the hatred of his brethren; as did also his dreams which he saw, and related to his father, and to them, which foretold his future happiness, it being usual with mankind to envy their very nearest relations such their prosperity. Now the visions which Joseph saw in his sleep were these:— 2.1. 3. Now these brethren of his were under distraction and terror, and thought that very great danger hung over them; yet not at all reflecting upon their brother Joseph, and standing firm under the accusations laid against them, they made their defense by Reubel, the eldest of them, who now became their spokesman:
3. Horace, Sermones, 2.5.62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 1.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Tristia, 4.10, 4.10.41-4.10.42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Vergil, Eclogues, 1.42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.42. no hope of freedom, and no thought to save.
7. Vergil, Georgics, 1.500 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.500. And learn by tokens sure, for then nor dimmed
8. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Tacitus, Annals, 1.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.4.  It was thus an altered world, and of the old, unspoilt Roman character not a trace lingered. Equality was an outworn creed, and all eyes looked to the mandate of the sovereign — with no immediate misgivings, so long as Augustus in the full vigour of his prime upheld himself, his house, and peace. But when the wearing effects of bodily sickness added themselves to advancing years, and the end was coming and new hopes dawning, a few voices began idly to discuss the blessings of freedom; more were apprehensive of war; others desired it; the great majority merely exchanged gossip derogatory to their future masters:— "Agrippa, fierce-tempered, and hot from his humiliation, was unfitted by age and experience for so heavy a burden. Tiberius Nero was mature in years and tried in war, but had the old, inbred arrogance of the Claudian family, and hints of cruelty, strive as he would to repress them, kept breaking out. He had been reared from the cradle in a regt house; consulates and triumphs had been heaped on his youthful head: even during the years when he lived at Rhodes in ostensible retirement and actual exile, he had studied nothing save anger, hypocrisy, and secret lasciviousness. Add to the tale his mother with her feminine caprice: they must be slaves, it appeared, to the distaff, and to a pair of striplings as well, who in the interval would oppress the state and in the upshot rend it asunder!


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(ancient versions) Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 147
aemilius macer Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
ars amatoria (ovid), contexts of composition Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
asia Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 147
augustan era, as literary context Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
augustan era Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
augustus, artistic freedom suppressed by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
augustus, mortality Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 190
bassus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
bull Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 147
continents' Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 147
drusus caesar Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 190
egypt Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 147
encomium Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
europa Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 147
europe Papadodima, Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II (2022) 147
fabius maximus, paulus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 190
fantham, elaine Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
gallus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
horace Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
iullus antonius Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 190
lygdamus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
maecenas Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
messalla corvinus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
naturalis historia (pliny) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
pliny Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
poets Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
ponticus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
propertius Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
putnam, michael c. j. Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
sulpicia Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
syme, ronald Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
tacitus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 190
tiberius caesar Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 190
tibullus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16
vergil Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 16