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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6705
Horace, Letters, 1.1.100
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.76 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.76. nam ut illa praeteream, quae sunt furoris, futuris K 1 furoris haec ipsa per sese sese V ( exp. 3 ) quam habent levitatem, quae videntur esse mediocria, Iniu/riae Ter. Eun. 59–63 Suspi/ciones i/nimicitiae induciae RV indu/tiae Bellu/m pax rursum! ince/rta haec si tu si tu s sit ut X ( prius t exp. V 3 ) po/stules Ratio/ne certa fa/cere, nihilo plu/s plus add. G 2 agas, Quam si/ des operam, ut cu/m ratione insa/nias. haec inconstantia mutabilitasque mentis quem non ipsa pravitate deterreat? est etiam etiam Man. enim illud, quod in omni perturbatione dicitur, demonstrandum, nullam esse nisi opinabilem, nisi iudicio susceptam, nisi voluntariam. etenim si naturalis amor esset, amor esset ex amorem et K c et amarent omnes et semper amarent et idem amarent, et idem amarent om. H neque alium pudor, alium cogitatio, alium satietas deterreret. etenim ... 26 deterreret H deterret G 1 Ira vero, quae quae -ae in r. V 2 quam diu perturbat animum, dubitationem insaniae non habet, cuius inpulsu imp. KR existit etiam inter fratres tale iurgium:
2. Horace, Odes, 1.9.7, 1.20.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Horace, Letters, 1.1, 1.1.1-1.1.12, 1.1.94-1.1.97, 1.1.106-1.1.108, 1.7, 1.20.25 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. 1. Those who undertake to write histories, do not, I perceive, take that trouble on one and the same account, but for many reasons, and those such as are very different one from another. 1.1. 3. I found, therefore, that the second of the Ptolemies was a king who was extraordinarily diligent in what concerned learning, and the collection of books; that he was also peculiarly ambitious to procure a translation of our law, and of the constitution of our government therein contained, into the Greek tongue. 1.1. it being an instance of greater wisdom not to have granted them life at all, than, after it was granted, to procure their destruction; “But the injuries,” said he, “they offered to my holiness and virtue, forced me to bring this punishment upon them. 1.7. but because this work would take up a great compass, I separated it into a set treatise by itself, with a beginning of its own, and its own conclusion; but in process of time, as usually happens to such as undertake great things, I grew weary and went on slowly, it being a large subject, and a difficult thing to translate our history into a foreign, and to us unaccustomed, language. 1.7. And that their inventions might not be lost before they were sufficiently known, upon Adam’s prediction that the world was to be destroyed at one time by the force of fire, and at another time by the violence and quantity of water, they made two pillars, the one of brick, the other of stone: they inscribed their discoveries on them both
4. Horace, Epodes, 9.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Sermones, 1.4.111, 1.6.72, 2.3.307, 2.3.309, 2.3.314-2.3.320, 2.3.325 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Strabo, Geography, 5.3.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.3.7. In the interior, the first city above Ostia is Rome; it is the only city built on the Tiber. It has been remarked above, that its position was fixed, not by choice, but necessity; to this must be added, that those who afterwards enlarged it, were not at liberty to select a better site, being prevented by what was already built. The first [kings] fortified the Capitol, the Palatium, and the Collis Quirinalis, which was so easy of access, that when Titus Tatius came to avenge the rape of the [Sabine] virgins, he took it on the first assault. Ancus Marcius, who added Mount Caelius and the Aventine Mount with the intermediate plain, separated as these places were both from each other and from what had been formerly fortified, was compelled to do this of necessity; since he did not consider it proper to leave outside his walls, heights so well protected by nature, to whomsoever might have a mind to fortify themselves upon them, while at the same time he was not capable of enclosing the whole as far as Mount Quirinus. Servius perceived this defect, and added the Esquiline and Viminal hills. As these were both of easy access from without, a deep trench was dug outside them and the earth thrown up on the inside, thus forming a terrace of 6 stadia in length along the inner side of the trench. This terrace he surmounted with a wall flanked with towers, and extending from the Colline to the Esquiline gate. Midway along the terrace is a third gate, named after the Viminal hill. Such is the Roman rampart, which seems to stand in need of other ramparts itself. But it seems to me that the first [founders] were of opinion, both in regard to themselves and their successors, that Romans had to depend not on fortifications, but on arms and their individual valour, both for safety and for wealth, and that walls were not a defence to men, but men were a defence to walls. At the period of its commencement, when the large and fertile districts surrounding the city belonged to others, and while it lay easily open to assault, there was nothing in its position which could be looked upon as favourable; but when by valour and labour these districts became its own, there succeeded a tide of prosperity surpassing the advantages of every other place. Thus, notwithstanding the prodigious increase of the city, there has been plenty of food, and also of wood and stone for ceaseless building, rendered necessary by the falling down of houses, and on account of conflagrations, and of the sales, which seem never to cease. These sales are a kind of voluntary falling down of houses, each owner knocking down and rebuilding one part or another, according to his individual taste. For these purposes the numerous quarries, the forests, and the rivers which convey the materials, offer wonderful facilities. of these rivers, the first is the Teverone, which flows from Alba, a city of the Latins near to the country of the Marsi, and from thence through the plain below this [city], till it unites with the Tiber. After this come the Nera (Nar) and the Timia, which passing through Ombrica fall into the Tiber, and the Chiana, which flows through Tyrrhenia and the territory of Clusiumn. Augustus Caesar endeavoured to avert from the city damages of the kind alluded to, and instituted a company of freedmen, who should be ready to lend their assistance in cases of conflagration; whilst, as a preventive against the falling of houses, he decreed that all new buildings should not be carried so high as formerly, and that those erected along the public ways should not exceed seventy feet in height. But these improvements must have ceased only for the facilities afforded by the quarries, the forests, and the ease of transport.
7. Juvenal, Satires, 3.7-3.9, 3.190-3.196 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 11.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 40.1, 103.1-103.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 51 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcaeus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 413
autonomy, and the philosophical epistle Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
buildings, poor construction of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
cicero, marcus tullius, house in rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
cicero Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
cloaca maxima (great drain) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
courtney, edward Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 285
crassus, marcus licinius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
density of urban mass Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
ennius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 413
epicureanism, and the epistolary genre Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
epicureanism, democratic aspect of Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175
epicureanism, retreat from social life of Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
epistolography, and interiority Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 178
epistolography, philosophical focus of Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 178
euphemism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
fable Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
fires Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
friendship, as cultural discourse Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175, 178
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
gladiatorial imagery Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
great drain (cloaca maxima) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
height, of buildings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
horace, and autonomy Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175
hyperbaton Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
identification in place of simile Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
kurke, leslie Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
lucretius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 413
maecenas, indebted to horace Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
maecenas, invitations to Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 178
maecenas, relationship with horace Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175, 176, 177, 178
maecenas Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
mayer, r. g. Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 285
muecke, frances Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 285
munus (munera), as gladiatorial show Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175
originality Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 413
palimpsestic rome, dynamic changeability of the city' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
palimpsestic rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
patronage, and autonomy Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175
patronage, and choice of genre Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 178
patronage, and debt Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 175
patronage, hierarchical imagery of Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 176, 177
persona of horace, criticised by interlocutors Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 285
praeneste Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
rhetoric, hyperbaton Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
sappho Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 413
stowers, stanley Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 178
subtext Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
terence Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 139
tibur Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 267
verse-epistle, transition from lyric to Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 177
wine imagery, in horace Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 178