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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6685
Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 428-433


nanDoled out to each one. First Mnemosyne


nanThe Muses’ mother, he acclaimed – her due


nanWas Maia’s son himself. According to


nanTheir ages, all the rest he hymned – how they


nanWere born – as on his arm his lyre lay.


nanA boundless longing seized Phoebus, and so


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 112, 26-28, 73-74, 885, 111 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

111. And all the deeds that they’ve performed so well
2. Homer, Iliad, 2.484-2.493, 15.187-15.193 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.484. /Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.487. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.488. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.489. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.491. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.492. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.493. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 15.187. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.188. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.189. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.190. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.192. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.193. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet
3. Homer, Odyssey, 8.487-8.491, 23.296, 24.1-24.204 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 101-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 20, 200-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-279, 28, 280-289, 29, 290-299, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-427, 429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-575, 58-100 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

100. A word – you’ll not be harmed in any way.
5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 183-206, 214-299, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-544, 182 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

322c. and thus they began to be scattered again and to perish. So Zeus, fearing that our race was in danger of utter destruction, sent Hermes to bring respect and right among men, to the end that there should be regulation of cities and friendly ties to draw them together. Then Hermes asked Zeus in what manner then was he to give men right and respect: Am I to deal them out as the arts have been dealt? That dealing was done in such wise that one man possessing medical art is able to treat many ordinary men, and so with the other craftsmen. Am I to place among men right and respect in this way also, or deal them out to all?
7. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 5.370-5.446, 7.664-7.685 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apollo, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 51, 347
apollo Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24; Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 326
aristarchus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
callimachus, and presentation of the divine Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 247
delos Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
discontinuity, geographical, in aetia, divine action, poets and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 247
divinities, in work of callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 247
divinities, origins and genealogies of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 247
egypt Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
ephebe Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 320
fable Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 327
greek magical papyri Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
hades Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
herakles/heracles/hercules, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 51
herdsman, and magic Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303, 347
herdsman, and sacrifice Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 330
herdsman, and the lyre Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303, 330
herdsman, as psychopomp Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
herdsman, kosmokrator Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
herdsman, of a theogony Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 51
herdsman, protector of herds Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 51
hermes, and cosmic justice Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 330
hermes, as cattle thief Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 51
hermes, chthonios Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
hermes Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
hermetica Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
hermetism Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
hesiod, the muses address Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 82
homer, gods' "758.0_247@hymn '1 to zeus" Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 247
homer, odyssey Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
homer, on muses and poetic inspiration Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 82
homeric hymn to hermes Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 82
hymn to the muses, gods Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 247
hymns, motifs in Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
hymns, narrative structure of Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
magical hymn to hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
maia Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 51, 303
miracle, healing Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 326
moira/moirai Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 330
mount olympus Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
narration Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
odysseus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 82
poetic inspiration' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 82
poets, theology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 247
sacrificial strike Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 322, 323, 324
thoth, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
thoth Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 303
thriai Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347