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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6684
Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 345-356


nanApart from all the gods sat as she pined


nanFor her deep-bosomed child. Mortals would find


nanUpon the fecund earth a cruel year


nanFor the well-wreathed Demeter kept each ear


nanFrom sprouting. Many a curving plough in vain


nanWas drawn by oxen. White barley would rain


nanTo no avail upon the ground. So she


nanWould have destroyed with cruel scarcity


nanAll of mankind and would have robbed as well


nanOf gifts and sacrifices those who dwell


nanHigh on Olympus did Lord Zeus not see


nanWhat she had done. He sent immediately


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 792-805, 277 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

277. Panopea, pink-armed Hipponoe
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.3, 11.55 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.3. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 11.55. /to send forth to Hades many a valiant head.And the Trojans over against them on the rising ground of the plain mustered about great Hector and peerless Polydamas and Aeneas that was honoured of the folk of the Trojans even as a god, and the three sons of Antenor, Polybus and goodly Agenor
3. Homer, Odyssey, 11.625-11.626, 17.485-17.487, 24.1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 198-201, 314, 334-344, 346-385, 441-469, 197 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

197. Their father’s house and told their mother all
5. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 125, 124 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

124. κῆρυξ μέγιστε τῶν ἄνω τε καὶ κάτω 124. ἄρηξον, Ἑρμῆ χθόνιε, κηρύξας ἐμοὶ 124. Supreme herald of the realm above and the realm below, O Hermes of the nether world, come to my aid
6. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Aeschylus, Persians, 629-630, 628 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

628. ἀλλά, χθόνιοι δαίμονες ἁγνοί
10. Euripides, Bacchae, 11-22, 279, 284, 41-42, 478, 48-50, 53-54, 541, 6-10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. αἰνῶ δὲ Κάδμον, ἄβατον ὃς πέδον τόδε 10. I praise Kadmos, who has made this place hallowed, the shrine of his daughter; and I have covered it all around with the cluster-bearing leaf of the vine.I have left the wealthy lands of the Lydians and Phrygians, the sun-parched plains of the Persians
11. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.219-4.278, 6.749 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.219. and mass their dust-blown squadrons in wild flight 4.220. far from the mountain's bound. Ascanius 4.221. flushed with the sport, spurs on a mettled steed 4.222. from vale to vale, and many a flying herd 4.223. his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224. among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225. a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills 4.227. Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228. mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229. the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230. is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line 4.232. of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may 4.233. with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234. the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235. Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237. and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; 4.238. the flash of lightnings on the conscious air 4.239. were torches to the bridal; from the hills 4.240. the wailing wood-nymphs sobbed a wedding song. 4.241. Such was that day of death, the source and spring 4.242. of many a woe. For Dido took no heed 4.243. of honor and good-name; nor did she mean 4.244. her loves to hide; but called the lawlessness 4.246. Swift through the Libyan cities Rumor sped. 4.247. Rumor! What evil can surpass her speed? 4.248. In movement she grows mighty, and achieves 4.249. trength and dominion as she swifter flies. 4.250. mall first, because afraid, she soon exalts 4.251. her stature skyward, stalking through the lands 4.252. and mantling in the clouds her baleful brow. 4.253. The womb of Earth, in anger at high Heaven 4.254. bore her, they say, last of the Titan spawn 4.255. ister to Coeus and Enceladus. 4.256. Feet swift to run and pinions like the wind 4.257. the dreadful monster wears; her carcase huge 4.258. is feathered, and at root of every plume 4.259. a peering eye abides; and, strange to tell 4.260. an equal number of vociferous tongues 4.261. foul, whispering lips, and ears, that catch at all. 4.262. At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven 4.263. her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud 4.264. nor e'er to happy slumber gives her eyes: 4.265. but with the morn she takes her watchful throne 4.266. high on the housetops or on lofty towers 4.267. to terrify the nations. She can cling 4.268. to vile invention and maligt wrong 4.269. or mingle with her word some tidings true. 4.270. She now with changeful story filled men's ears 4.271. exultant, whether false or true she sung: 4.272. how, Trojan-born Aeneas having come 4.273. Dido, the lovely widow, Iooked his way 4.274. deigning to wed; how all the winter long 4.275. they passed in revel and voluptuous ease 4.276. to dalliance given o'er; naught heeding now 4.277. of crown or kingdom—shameless! lust-enslaved! 4.278. Such tidings broadcast on the lips of men 6.749. Here Earth's first offspring, the Titanic brood
12. Statius, Thebais, 3.129 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 1.90-1.124, 1.321-1.323, 1.345-1.351, 24.82 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 12.160, 12.189



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeacus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
aegina Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
aeneas Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
cadmus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
crete Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
daimon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
death associated with dionysos and dionysian cult or myth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
demeter Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
dicte Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
dido Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
dionysos, realm Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
eagle Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
earth, earthly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
europe (personal name) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
heaven Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
heliads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
hera Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
herakles/heracles/hercules Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
herdsman, as psychopomp Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
herdsman, in homer Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
hermes, chthonios Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
indian Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
iris Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
mercury/hermes, in vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
metamorphosis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
mt olympus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
persephone Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
persia, persian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
persians Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
phrygia, phrygian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
poseidon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
rhea Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
underworld Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
vergil, aeneid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
vine wood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
visibility Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
war (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 127
wine' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 309