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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6693
Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 40


nanIda’s dark hills, Phocaea and Scyros


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 1001-1022, 886-961, 963, 965-1000 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1000. The loveliest tots in the whole company
2. Homer, Iliad, 2.729-2.732, 4.200-4.202, 15.187-15.192 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.730. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 2.731. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 2.732. /and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 4.200. /glancing this way and that for the warrior Machaon; and he marked him as he stood, and round about him were the stalwart ranks of the shield-bearing hosts that followed him from Trica, the pastureland of horses. And he came up to him, and spake winged words, saying:Rouse thee, son of Asclepius; lord Agamemnon calleth thee 4.201. /glancing this way and that for the warrior Machaon; and he marked him as he stood, and round about him were the stalwart ranks of the shield-bearing hosts that followed him from Trica, the pastureland of horses. And he came up to him, and spake winged words, saying:Rouse thee, son of Asclepius; lord Agamemnon calleth thee 4.202. /glancing this way and that for the warrior Machaon; and he marked him as he stood, and round about him were the stalwart ranks of the shield-bearing hosts that followed him from Trica, the pastureland of horses. And he came up to him, and spake winged words, saying:Rouse thee, son of Asclepius; lord Agamemnon calleth thee 15.187. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.188. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.189. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.190. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.192. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet
3. Homer, Odyssey, 10.490-10.495, 11.90-11.151 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-199, 20, 200-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-279, 28, 280-289, 29, 290-299, 3, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 4, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 5, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-512, 52-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 10 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

10. While white-armed Hera sweetly slept, and when
5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-219, 22, 220-229, 23, 230-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-269, 27, 270-279, 28, 280-289, 29, 290-299, 3, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 4, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 5, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-544, 55-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

1. Apollo, the Far-Shooter, I’ll recall
6. Hymn To Apollo, To Apollo, 332-520, 331 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7. Hymn To Apollo (Homeric Hymn 21), To Apollo, 217-299, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-544, 55-87, 216 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

8. Pindar, Isthmian Odes, 6.31-6.32 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 4.26 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Pindar, Paeanes, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Hecuba, 1468-1480, 1593, 1467 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 688-695, 687 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

687. The maids of Delos raise their song of joy, circling round the temple gates in honor of Leto’s fair son
13. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1468-1480, 1593, 281-284, 299, 1467 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Herodotus, Histories, 7.59-7.83, 8.111-8.112, 8.121-8.122, 9.101, 9.106 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.59. The territory of Doriscus is in Thrace, a wide plain by the sea, and through it flows a great river, the Hebrus; here had been built that royal fortress which is called Doriscus, and a Persian guard had been posted there by Darius ever since the time of his march against Scythia. ,It seemed to Xerxes to be a fit place for him to arrange and number his army, and he did so. All the ships had now arrived at Doriscus, and the captains at Xerxes' command brought them to the beach near Doriscus, where stands the Samothracian city of Sane, and Zone; at the end is Serreum, a well-known headland. This country was in former days possessed by the Cicones. ,To this beach they brought in their ships and hauled them up for rest. Meanwhile Xerxes made a reckoning of his forces at Doriscus. 7.60. I cannot give the exact number that each part contributed to the total, for there is no one who tells us that; but the total of the whole land army was shown to be one million and seven hundred thousand. ,They were counted in this way: ten thousand men were collected in one place, and when they were packed together as closely as could be a line was drawn around them; when this was drawn, the ten thousand were sent away and a wall of stones was built on the line reaching up to a man's navel; ,when this was done, others were brought into the walled space, until in this way all were numbered. When they had been numbered, they were marshalled by nations. 7.61. The men who served in the army were the following: the Persians were equipped in this way: they wore on their heads loose caps called tiaras, and on their bodies embroidered sleeved tunics, with scales of iron like the scales of fish in appearance, and trousers on their legs; for shields they had wicker bucklers, with quivers hanging beneath them; they carried short spears, long bows, and reed arrows, and daggers that hung from the girdle by the right thigh. ,Their commander was Otanes, son of Amestris and father of Xerxes' wife. They were formerly called by the Greeks Cephenes, but by themselves and their neighbors Artaei. ,When Perseus son of Danae and Zeus had come to Cepheus son of Belus and married his daughter Andromeda, a son was born to him whom he called Perses, and he left him there; for Cepheus had no male offspring; it was from this Perses that the Persians took their name. 7.62. The Medes in the army were equipped like the Persians; indeed, that fashion of armor is Median, not Persian. Their commander was Tigranes, an Achaemenid. The Medes were formerly called by everyone Arians, but when the Colchian woman Medea came from Athens to the Arians they changed their name, like the Persians. This is the Medes' own account of themselves. ,The Cissians in the army were equipped like the Persians, but they wore turbans instead of caps. Their commander was Anaphes son of Otanes. The Hyrcanians were armed like the Persians; their leader was Megapanus, who was afterwards the governor of Babylon. 7.63. The Assyrians in the army wore on their heads helmets of twisted bronze made in an outlandish fashion not easy to describe. They carried shields and spears and daggers of Egyptian fashion, and also wooden clubs studded with iron, and they wore linen breastplates. They are called by the Greeks Syrians, but the foreigners called them Assyrians. With them were the Chaldeans. Their commander was Otaspes son of Artachaees. 7.64. The Bactrians in the army wore a headgear very similar to the Median, carrying their native reed bows and short spears. ,The Sacae, who are Scythians, had on their heads tall caps, erect and stiff and tapering to a point; they wore trousers, and carried their native bows, and daggers, and also axes which they call “sagaris.” These were Amyrgian Scythians, but were called Sacae; that is the Persian name for all Scythians. The commander of the Bactrians and Sacae was Hystaspes, son of Darius and Cyrus' daughter Atossa. 7.65. The Indians wore garments of tree-wool, and carried reed bows and iron-tipped reed arrows. Such was their equipment; they were appointed to march under the command of Pharnazathres son of Artabates. 7.66. The Arians were equipped with Median bows, but in all else like the Bactrians; their commander was Sisamnes son of Hydarnes. The Parthians, Chorasmians, Sogdians, Gandarians, and Dadicae in the army had the same equipment as the Bactrians. ,The Parthians and Chorasmians had for their commander Artabazus son of Pharnaces, the Sogdians Azanes son of Artaeus, the Gandarians and Dadicae Artyphius son of Artabanus. 7.67. The Caspians in the army wore cloaks and carried their native reed bows and short swords. Such was their equipment; their leader was Ariomardus, brother of Artyphius. The Sarangae were conspicuous in their dyed garments and knee-high boots, carrying bows and Median spears. Their commander was Pherendates son of Megabazus. ,The Pactyes wore cloaks and carried their native bows and daggers; their commander was Artayntes son of Ithamitres. 7.68. The Utians and Mycians and Paricanians were equipped like the Pactyes; the Utians and Mycians had for their commander Arsamenes son of Darius, the Paricanians Siromitres son of Oeobazus. 7.69. The Arabians wore mantles girded up, and carried at their right side long bows curving backwards. The Ethiopians were wrapped in skins of leopards and lions, and carried bows made of palmwood strips, no less than four cubits long, and short arrows pointed not with iron but with a sharpened stone that they use to carve seals; furthermore, they had spears pointed with a gazelle's horn sharpened like a lance, and also studded clubs. ,When they went into battle they painted half their bodies with gypsum and the other half with vermilion. The Arabians and the Ethiopians who dwell above Egypt had as commander Arsames, the son of Darius and Artystone daughter of Cyrus, whom Darius loved best of his wives; he had an image made of her of hammered gold. 7.70. The Ethiopians above Egypt and the Arabians had Arsames for commander, while the Ethiopians of the east (for there were two kinds of them in the army) served with the Indians; they were not different in appearance from the others, only in speech and hair: the Ethiopians from the east are straight-haired, but the ones from Libya have the woolliest hair of all men. ,These Ethiopians of Asia were for the most part armed like the Indians; but they wore on their heads the skins of horses' foreheads, stripped from the head with ears and mane; the mane served them for a crest, and they wore the horses' ears stiff and upright; for shields they had bucklers of the skin of cranes. 7.71. The Libyans came in leather garments, using javelins of burnt wood. Their commander was Massages son of Oarizus. 7.72. The Paphlagonians in the army had woven helmets on their heads, and small shields and short spears, and also javelins and daggers; they wore their native shoes that reach midway to the knee. The Ligyes and Matieni and Mariandyni and Syrians were equipped like the Paphlagonians. These Syrians are called by the Persians Cappadocians. ,Dotus son of Megasidrus was commander of the Paphlagonians and Matieni, Gobryas son of Darius and Artystone of the Mariandyni and Ligyes and Syrians. 7.73. The Phrygian equipment was very similar to the Paphlagonian, with only a small difference. As the Macedonians say, these Phrygians were called Briges as long as they dwelt in Europe, where they were neighbors of the Macedonians; but when they changed their home to Asia, they changed their name also and were called Phrygians. The Armenians, who are settlers from Phrygia, were armed like the Phrygians. Both these together had as their commander Artochmes, who had married a daughter of Darius. 7.74. The Lydian armor was most similar to the Greek. The Lydians were formerly called Meiones, until they changed their name and were called after Lydus son of Atys. The Mysians wore on their heads their native helmets, carrying small shields and javelins of burnt wood. ,They are settlers from Lydia, and are called Olympieni after the mountain Olympus. The commander of the Lydians and Mysians was that Artaphrenes son of Artaphrenes, who attacked Marathon with Datis. 7.75. The Thracians in the army wore fox-skin caps on their heads, and tunics on their bodies; over these they wore embroidered mantles; they had shoes of fawnskin on their feet and legs; they also had javelins and little shields and daggers. ,They took the name of Bithynians after they crossed over to Asia; before that they were called (as they themselves say) Strymonians, since they lived by the Strymon; they say that they were driven from their homes by Teucrians and Mysians. The commander of the Thracians of Asia was Bassaces son of Artabanus. 7.76. The <Pisidians> had little shields of raw oxhide; each man carried two wolf-hunters' spears; they wore helmets of bronze, and on these helmets were the ears and horns of oxen wrought in bronze, and also crests; their legs were wrapped around with strips of purple rags. Among these men is a place of divination sacred to Ares. 7.77. The Cabelees, who are Meiones and are called Lasonii, had the same equipment as the Cilicians; when I come in my narrative to the place of the Cilicians, I will then declare what it was. The Milyae had short spears and garments fastened by brooches; some of them carried Lycian bows and wore caps of skin on their heads. The commander of all these was Badres son of Hystanes. 7.78. The Moschi wore wooden helmets on their heads, and carried shields and small spears with long points. The Tibareni and Macrones and Mossynoeci in the army were equipped like the Moschi. The commanders who marshalled them were, for the Moschi and Tibareni, Ariomardus son of Darius and Parmys, the daughter of Cyrus' son Smerdis; for the Macrones and Mossynoeci, Artayctes son of Cherasmis, who was governor of Sestus on the Hellespont. 7.79. The Mares wore on their heads their native woven helmets, and carried javelins and small hide shields. The Colchians had wooden helmets and small shields of raw oxhide and short spears, and also swords. The commander of the Mares and Colchians was Pharandates son of Teaspis. The Alarodians and Saspires in the army were armed like the Colchians; Masistius son of Siromitres was their commander. 7.80. The island tribes that came from the Red Sea, and from the islands where the king settles those who are called Exiles, wore dress and armor very similar to the Median. The commander of these islanders was Mardontes son of Bagaeus, who in the next year was general at Mykale and died in the battle. 7.81. These are the nations that marched by the mainland and had their places in the infantry. The commanders of this army were those whom I have mentioned, and they were the ones who marshalled and numbered them and appointed captains of thousands and ten thousands; the captains of ten thousands appointed the captains of hundreds and of tens. There were others who were leaders of companies and nations. 7.82. These were the commanders, as I have said; the generals of these and of the whole infantry were Mardonius son of Gobryas, Tritantaechmes son of that Artabanus who delivered the opinion that there should be no expedition against Hellas, Smerdomenes son of Otanes (these two latter were sons of Darius' brothers, and thus they were Xerxes' cousins), Masistes son of Darius and Atossa, Gergis son of Ariazus, and Megabyzus son of Zopyrus. 7.83. These were the generals of the whole infantry, except the Ten Thousand. Hydarnes son of Hydarnes was general of these picked ten thousand Persians, who were called Immortals for this reason: when any one of them was forced to fall out of the number by death or sickness, another was chosen so that they were never more or fewer than ten thousand. ,The Persians showed the richest adornment of all, and they were the best men in the army. Their equipment was such as I have said; beyond this they stood out by the abundance of gold that they had. They also brought carriages bearing concubines and many well-equipped servants; camels and beasts of burden carried food for them, apart from the rest of the army. 8.111. But the Greeks, now that they were no longer minded to pursue the barbarians' ships farther or sail to the Hellespont and break the way of passage, besieged Andros so that they might take it, ,for the men of that place, the first islanders of whom Themistocles demanded money, would not give it. When, however, Themistocles gave them to understand that the Athenians had come with two great gods to aid them, Persuasion and Necessity, and that the Andrians must therefore certainly give money, they said in response, “It is then but reasonable that Athens is great and prosperous, being blessed with serviceable gods. ,As for us Andrians, we are but blessed with a plentiful lack of land, and we have two unserviceable gods who never quit our island but want to dwell there forever, namely Poverty and Helplessness. Since we are in the hands of these gods, we will give no money; the power of Athens can never be stronger than our inability.” 8.112. It was for giving this answer and refusing to give what was asked of them that they were besieged. There was no end to Themistocles' avarice; using the same agents whom he had used with the king, he sent threatening messages to the other islands, demanding money and saying that if they would not give what he asked he would bring the Greek armada upon them and besiege and take their islands. ,Thereby he collected great sums from the Carystians and Parians, for these were informed that Andros was besieged for taking the Persian side and that Themistocles was of all the generals the most esteemed. This frightened them so much that they sent money. I suppose that there were other islanders too who gave and not these alone, but I cannot with certainty say. ,Nevertheless, the Carystians got no respite from misfortune by doing this. The Parians, however, propitiated Themistocles with money and so escaped the force. So Themistocles went away from Andros and took money from the islanders, unknown to the other generals. 8.121. As for the Greeks, not being able to take Andros, they went to Carystus. When they had laid it waste, they returned to Salamis. First of all they set apart for the gods, among other first-fruits, three Phoenician triremes, one to be dedicated at the Isthmus, where it was till my lifetime, the second at Sunium, and the third for Ajax at Salamis where they were. ,After that, they divided the spoils and sent the first-fruits of it to Delphi; of this was made a man's image twelve cubits high, holding in his hand the figurehead of a ship. This stood in the same place as the golden statue of Alexander the Macedonian. 8.122. Having sent the first-fruits to Delphi, the Greeks, in the name of the country generally, made inquiry of the god whether the first-fruits which he had received were of full measure and whether he was content. To this he said that he was content with what he had received from all other Greeks, but not from the Aeginetans. From these he demanded the victor's prize for the sea-fight of Salamis. When the Aeginetans learned that, they dedicated three golden stars which are set on a bronze mast, in the angle, nearest to Croesus' bowl. 9.101. Moreover, there was the additional coincidence, that there were precincts of Eleusinian Demeter on both battlefields; for at Plataea the fight was near the temple of Demeter, as I have already said, and so it was to be at Mykale also. ,It happened that the rumor of a victory won by the Greeks with Pausanias was true, for the defeat at Plataea happened while it was yet early in the day, and the defeat of Mykale in the afternoon. That the two fell on the same day of the same month was proven to the Greeks when they examined the matter not long afterwards. ,Now before this rumor came they had been faint-hearted, fearing less for themselves than for the Greeks with Pausanias, that Hellas should stumble over Mardonius. But when the report sped among them, they grew stronger and swifter in their onset. So Greeks and barbarians alike were eager for battle, seeing that the islands and the Hellespont were the prizes of victory. 9.106. When the Greeks had made an end of most of the barbarians, either in battle or in flight, they brought out their booty onto the beach, and found certain stores of wealth. Then after burning the ships and the whole of the wall, they sailed away. ,When they had arrived at Samos, they debated in council over the removal of all Greeks from Ionia, and in what Greek lands under their dominion it would be best to plant the Ionians, leaving the country itself to the barbarians; for it seemed impossible to stand on guard between the Ionians and their enemies forever. If, however, they should not so stand, they had no hope that the Persians would permit the Ionians to go unpunished. ,In this matter the Peloponnesians who were in charge were for removing the people from the lands of those Greek nations which had sided with the Persians and giving their land to the Ionians to dwell in. The Athenians disliked the whole plan of removing the Greeks from Ionia, or allowing the Peloponnesians to determine the lot of Athenian colonies, and as they resisted vehemently, the Peloponnesians yielded. ,It accordingly came about that they admitted to their alliance the Samians, Chians, Lesbians, and all other islanders who had served with their forces, and bound them by pledge and oaths to remain faithful and not desert their allies. When the oaths had been sworn, the Greeks set sail to break the bridges, supposing that these still held fast. So they laid their course for the Hellespont.
15. Sophocles, Antigone, 988-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Callimachus, Hymn To Delos, 28-29, 35-45, 160 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

17. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.23-1.233 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.23. πρῶτά νυν Ὀρφῆος μνησώμεθα, τόν ῥά ποτʼ αὐτὴ 1.24. Καλλιόπη Θρήικι φατίζεται εὐνηθεῖσα 1.25. Οἰάγρῳ σκοπιῆς Πιμπληίδος ἄγχι τεκέσθαι 1.26. αὐτὰρ τόνγʼ ἐνέπουσιν ἀτειρέας οὔρεσι πέτρας 1.27. θέλξαι ἀοιδάων ἐνοπῇ ποταμῶν τε ῥέεθρα. 1.28. φηγοὶ δʼ ἀγριάδες, κείνης ἔτι σήματα μολπῆς 1.29. ἀκτῆς Θρηικίης Ζώνης ἔπι τηλεθόωσαι 1.30. ἑξείης στιχόωσιν ἐπήτριμοι, ἃς ὅγʼ ἐπιπρὸ 1.31. θελγομένας φόρμιγγι κατήγαγε Πιερίηθεν. 1.32. Ὀρφέα μὲν δὴ τοῖον ἑῶν ἐπαρωγὸν ἀέθλων 1.33. Αἰσονίδης Χείρωνος ἐφημοσύνῃσι πιθήσας 1.34. δέξατο, Πιερίῃ Βιστωνίδι κοιρανέοντα. 1.35. ἤλυθε δʼ Ἀστερίων αὐτοσχεδόν, ὅν ῥα Κομήτης 1.36. γείνατο δινήεντος ἐφʼ ὕδασιν Ἀπιδανοῖο 1.37. Πειρεσιὰς ὄρεος Φυλληίου ἀγχόθι ναίων 1.38. ἔνθα μὲν Ἀπιδανός τε μέγας καὶ δῖος Ἐνιπεὺς 1.39. ἄμφω συμφορέονται, ἀπόπροθεν εἰς ἓν ἰόντες. 1.40. Λάρισαν δʼ ἐπὶ τοῖσι λιπὼν Πολύφημος ἵκανεν 1.41. Εἰλατίδης, ὃς πρὶν μὲν ἐρισθενέων Λαπιθάων 1.42. ὁππότε Κενταύροις Λαπίθαι ἐπὶ θωρήσσοντο 1.43. ὁπλότερος πολέμιζε· τότʼ αὖ βαρύθεσκέ οἱ ἤδη 1.44. γυῖα, μένεν δʼ ἔτι θυμὸς ἀρήιος, ὡς τὸ πάρος περ. 1.45. οὐδὲ μὲν Ἴφικλος Φυλάκῃ ἔνι δηρὸν ἔλειπτο 1.46. μήτρως Αἰσονίδαο· κασιγνήτην γὰρ ὄπυιεν 1.47. Αἴσων Ἀλκιμέδην Φυλακηίδα· τῆς μιν ἀνώγει 1.48. πηοσύνη καὶ κῆδος ἐνικρινθῆναι ὁμίλῳ. 1.49. οὐδὲ Φεραῖς Ἄδμητος ἐυρρήνεσσιν ἀνάσσων 1.50. μίμνεν ὑπὸ σκοπιὴν ὄρεος Χαλκωδονίοιο. 1.51. οὐδʼ Ἀλόπῃ μίμνον πολυλήιοι Ἑρμείαο 1.52. υἱέες εὖ δεδαῶτε δόλους, Ἔρυτος καὶ Ἐχίων 1.53. τοῖσι δʼ ἐπὶ τρίτατος γνωτὸς κίε νισσομένοισιν 1.54. Αἰθαλίδης· καὶ τὸν μὲν ἐπʼ Ἀμφρυσσοῖο ῥοῇσιν 1.55. Μυρμιδόνος κούρη Φθιὰς τέκεν Εὐπολέμεια· 1.56. τὼ δʼ αὖτʼ ἐκγεγάτην Μενετηίδος Ἀντιανείρης. 1.57. ἤλυθε δʼ ἀφνειὴν προλιπὼν Γυρτῶνα Κόρωνος 1.58. Καινεΐδης, ἐσθλὸς μέν, ἑοῦ δʼ οὐ πατρὸς ἀμείνων. 1.59. Καινέα γὰρ ζῶόν περ ἔτι κλείουσιν ἀοιδοὶ 1.60. Κενταύροισιν ὀλέσθαι, ὅτε σφέας οἶος ἀπʼ ἄλλων 1.61. ἤλασʼ ἀριστήων· οἱ δʼ ἔμπαλιν ὁρμηθέντες 1.62. οὔτε μιν ἐγκλῖναι προτέρω σθένον, οὔτε δαΐξαι· 1.63. ἀλλʼ ἄρρηκτος ἄκαμπτος ἐδύσετο νειόθι γαίης 1.64. θεινόμενος στιβαρῇσι καταΐγδην ἐλάτῃσιν. 1.65. ἤλυθε δʼ αὖ Μόψος Τιταρήσιος, ὃν περὶ πάντων 1.66. Λητοΐδης ἐδίδαξε θεοπροπίας οἰωνῶν· 1.67. ἠδὲ καὶ Εὐρυδάμας Κτιμένου πάις· ἄγχι δὲ λίμνης 1.68. Ξυνιάδος Κτιμένην Δολοπηίδα ναιετάασκεν. 1.69. καὶ μὴν Ἄκτωρ υἷα Μενοίτιον ἐξ Ὀπόεντος 1.70. ὦρσεν, ἀριστήεσσι σὺν ἀνδράσιν ὄφρα νέοιτο. 1.71. εἵπετο δʼ Εὐρυτίων τε καὶ ἀλκήεις Ἐρυβώτης 1.72. υἷες ὁ μὲν Τελέοντος, ὁ δʼ Ἴρου Ἀκτορίδαο· 1.73. ἤτοι ὁ μὲν Τελέοντος ἐυκλειὴς Ἐρυβώτης 1.74. Ἴρου δʼ Εὐρυτίων. σὺν καὶ τρίτος ἦεν Ὀιλεύς 1.75. ἔξοχος ἠνορέην καὶ ἐπαΐξαι μετόπισθεν 1.76. εὖ δεδαὼς δῄοισιν, ὅτε κλίνωσι φάλαγγας. 1.77. αὐτὰρ ἀπʼ Εὐβοίης Κάνθος κίε, τόν ῥα Κάνηθος 1.78. πέμπεν Ἀβαντιάδης λελιημένον· οὐ μὲν ἔμελλεν 1.79. νοστήσειν Κήρινθον ὑπότροπος. αισα γὰρ ἦεν 1.80. αὐτὸν ὁμῶς Μόψον τε δαήμονα μαντοσυνάων 1.81. πλαγχθέντας Λιβύης ἐνὶ πείρασι δῃωθῆναι 1.82. ὡς οὐκ ἀνθρώποισι κακὸν μήκιστον ἐπαυρεῖν 1.83. ὁππότε κἀκείνους Λιβύῃ ἔνι ταρχύσαντο 1.84. τόσσον ἑκὰς Κόλχων, ὅσσον τέ περ ἠελίοιο 1.85. μεσσηγὺς δύσιές τε καὶ ἀντολαὶ εἰσορόωνται. 1.86. τῷ δʼ ἄρʼ ἐπὶ Κλυτίος τε καὶ Ἴφιτος ἠγερέθοντο 1.87. Οἰχαλίης ἐπίουροι, ἀπηνέος Εὐρύτου υἷες 1.88. Εὐρύτου, ᾧ πόρε τόξον Ἑκηβόλος· οὐδʼ ἀπόνητο 1.89. δωτίνης· αὐτῷ γὰρ ἑκὼν ἐρίδηνε δοτῆρι. 1.90. τοῖσι δʼ ἐπʼ Αἰακίδαι μετεκίαθον· οὐ μὲν ἅμʼ ἄμφω 1.91. οὐδʼ ὁμόθεν· νόσφιν γὰρ ἀλευάμενοι κατένασθεν 1.92. Αἰγίνης, ὅτε Φῶκον ἀδελφεὸν ἐξενάριξαν 1.93. ἀφραδίῃ. Τελαμὼν μὲν ἐν Ἀτθίδι νάσσατο νήσῳ· 1.94. Πηλεὺς δὲ Φθίῃ ἐνὶ δώματα ναῖε λιασθείς. 1.95. τοῖς δʼ ἐπὶ Κεκροπίηθεν ἀρήιος ἤλυθε Βούτης 1.96. παῖς ἀγαθοῦ Τελέοντος, ἐυμμελίης τε Φάληρος. 1.97. Ἄλκων μιν προέηκε πατὴρ ἑός· οὐ μὲν ἔτʼ ἄλλους 1.98. γήραος υἷας ἔχεν βιότοιό τε κηδεμονῆας. 1.99. ἀλλά ἑ τηλύγετόν περ ὁμῶς καὶ μοῦνον ἐόντα 1.100. πέμπεν, ἵνα θρασέεσσι μεταπρέποι ἡρώεσσιν. 1.101. Θησέα δʼ, ὃς περὶ πάντας Ἐρεχθεΐδας ἐκέκαστο 1.102. Ταιναρίην ἀίδηλος ὑπὸ χθόνα δεσμὸς ἔρυκεν 1.103. Πειρίθῳ ἑσπόμενον κοινὴν ὁδόν· ἦ τέ κεν ἄμφω 1.104. ῥηίτερον καμάτοιο τέλος πάντεσσιν ἔθεντο. 1.105. Τῖφυς δʼ Ἁγνιάδης Σιφαέα κάλλιπε δῆμον 1.106. Θεσπιέων, ἐσθλὸς μὲν ὀρινόμενον προδαῆναι 1.107. κῦμʼ ἁλὸς εὐρείης, ἐσθλὸς δʼ ἀνέμοιο θυέλλας 1.108. καὶ πλόον ἠελίῳ τε καὶ ἀστέρι τεκμήρασθαι. 1.109. αὐτή μιν Τριτωνὶς ἀριστήων ἐς ὅμιλον 1.110. ὦρσεν Ἀθηναίη, μετὰ δʼ ἤλυθεν ἐλδομένοισιν. 1.111. αὐτὴ γὰρ καὶ νῆα θοὴν κάμε· σὺν δέ οἱ Ἄργος 1.112. τεῦξεν Ἀρεστορίδης κείνης ὑποθημοσύνῃσιν. 1.113. τῶ καὶ πασάων προφερεστάτη ἔπλετο νηῶν 1.114. ὅσσαι ὑπʼ εἰρεσίῃσιν ἐπειρήσαντο θαλάσσης. 1.115. Φλίας δʼ αὖτʼ ἐπὶ τοῖσιν Ἀραιθυρέηθεν ἵκανεν 1.116. ἔνθʼ ἀφνειὸς ἔναιε Διωνύσοιο ἕκητι 1.117. πατρὸς ἑοῦ, πηγῇσιν ἐφέστιος Ἀσωποῖο. 1.118. Ἀργόθεν αὖ Ταλαὸς καὶ Ἀρήιος, υἷε Βίαντος 1.119. ἤλυθον ἴφθιμός τε Λεώδοκος, οὓς τέκε Πηρὼ 1.120. Νηληίς· τῆς δʼ ἀμφὶ δύην ἐμόγησε βαρεῖαν 1.121. Αἰολίδης σταθμοῖσιν ἐν Ἰφίκλοιο Μελάμπους. 1.122. οὐδὲ μὲν οὐδὲ βίην κρατερόφρονος Ἡρακλῆος 1.123. πευθόμεθʼ Αἰσονίδαο λιλαιομένου ἀθερίξαι. 1.124. ἀλλʼ ἐπεὶ ἄιε βάξιν ἀγειρομένων ἡρώων 1.125. νεῖον ἀπʼ Ἀρκαδίης Λυρκήιον Ἄργος ἀμείψας 1.126. τὴν ὁδόν, ᾗ ζωὸν φέρε κάπριον, ὅς ῥʼ ἐνὶ βήσσῃς 1.127. φέρβετο Λαμπείης, Ἐρυμάνθιον ἂμ μέγα τῖφος 1.128. τὸν μὲν ἐνὶ πρώτῃσι Μυκηναίων ἀγορῇσιν 1.129. δεσμοῖς ἰλλόμενον μεγάλων ἀπεθήκατο νώτων· 1.130. αὐτὸς δʼ ᾗ ἰότητι παρὲκ νόον Εὐρυσθῆος 1.131. ὡρμήθη· σὺν καί οἱ Ὕλας κίεν, ἐσθλὸς ὀπάων 1.132. πρωθήβης, ἰῶν τε φορεὺς φύλακός τε βιοῖο. 1.133. τῷ δʼ ἐπὶ δὴ θείοιο κίεν Δαναοῖο γενέθλη 1.134. Ναύπλιος. ἦ γὰρ ἔην Κλυτονήου Ναυβολίδαο· 1.135. Ναύβολος αὖ Λέρνου· Λέρνον γε μὲν ἴδμεν ἐόντα 1.136. Προίτου Ναυπλιάδαο· Ποσειδάωνι δὲ κούρη. 1.137. πρίν ποτʼ Ἀμυμώνη Δαναῒς τέκεν εὐνηθεῖσα 1.138. Ναύπλιον, ὃς περὶ πάντας ἐκαίνυτο ναυτιλίῃσιν. 1.139. Ἴδμων δʼ ὑστάτιος μετεκίαθεν, ὅσσοι ἔναιον 1.140. Ἄργος, ἐπεὶ δεδαὼς τὸν ἑὸν μόρον οἰωνοῖσιν 1.141. ἤιε, μή οἱ δῆμος ἐυκλείης ἀγάσαιτο. 1.142. οὐ μὲν ὅγʼ ἦεν Ἄβαντος ἐτήτυμον, ἀλλά μιν αὐτὸς 1.143. γείνατο κυδαλίμοις ἐναρίθμιον Αἰολίδῃσιν 1.144. Λητοΐδης· αὐτὸς δὲ θεοπροπίας ἐδίδαξεν 1.145. οἰωνούς τʼ ἀλέγειν ἠδʼ ἔμπυρα σήματʼ ἰδέσθαι. 1.146. καὶ μὴν Αἰτωλὶς κρατερὸν Πολυδεύκεα Λήδη 1.147. Κάστορά τʼ ὠκυπόδων ὦρσεν δεδαημένον ἵππων 1.148. Σπάρτηθεν· τοὺς δʼ ἥγε δόμοις ἔνι Τυνδαρέοιο 1.149. τηλυγέτους ὠδῖνι μιῇ τέκεν· οὐδʼ ἀπίθησεν 1.150. νισσομένοις· Ζηνὸς γὰρ ἐπάξια μήδετο λέκτρων. 1.151. οἵ τʼ Ἀφαρητιάδαι Λυγκεὺς καὶ ὑπέρβιος Ἴδας 1.152. Ἀρήνηθεν ἔβαν, μεγάλῃ περιθαρσέες ἀλκῇ 1.153. ἀμφότεροι· Λυγκεὺς δὲ καὶ ὀξυτάτοις ἐκέκαστο 1.154. ὄμμασιν, εἰ ἐτεόν γε πέλει κλέος, ἀνέρα κεῖνον 1.155. ῥηιδίως καὶ νέρθε κατὰ χθονὸς αὐγάζεσθαι. 1.156. σὺν δὲ Περικλύμενος Νηλήιος ὦρτο νέεσθαι 1.157. πρεσβύτατος παίδων, ὅσσοι Πύλῳ ἐξεγένοντο 1.158. Νηλῆος θείοιο· Ποσειδάων δέ οἱ ἀλκὴν 1.159. δῶκεν ἀπειρεσίην ἠδʼ ὅττι κεν ἀρήσαιτο 1.160. μαρνάμενος, τὸ πέλεσθαι ἐνὶ ξυνοχῇ πολέμοιο. 1.161. καὶ μὴν Ἀμφιδάμας Κηφεύς τʼ ἴσαν Ἀρκαδίηθεν 1.162. οἳ Τεγέην καὶ κλῆρον Ἀφειδάντειον ἔναιον 1.163. υἷε δύω Ἀλεοῦ· τρίτατός γε μὲν ἕσπετʼ ἰοῦσιν 1.164. Ἀγκαῖος, τὸν μέν ῥα πατὴρ Λυκόοργος ἔπεμπεν 1.165. τῶν ἄμφω γνωτὸς προγενέστερος. ἀλλʼ ὁ μὲν ἤδη 1.166. γηράσκοντʼ Ἀλεὸν λίπετʼ ἂμ πόλιν ὄφρα κομίζοι 1.167. παῖδα δʼ ἑὸν σφετέροισι κασιγνήτοισιν ὄπασσεν. 1.168. βῆ δʼ ὅγε Μαιναλίης ἄρκτου δέρος, ἀμφίτομόν τε 1.169. δεξιτερῇ πάλλων πέλεκυν μέγαν. ἔντεα γάρ οἱ 1.170. πατροπάτωρ Ἀλεὸς μυχάτῃ ἐνέκρυψε καλιῇ 1.171. αἴ κέν πως ἔτι καὶ τὸν ἐρητύσειε νέεσθαι. 1.172. βῆ δὲ καὶ Αὐγείης, ὃν δὴ φάτις Ἠελίοιο 1.173. ἔμμεναι· Ἠλείοισι δʼ ὅγʼ ἀνδράσιν ἐμβασίλευεν 1.174. ὄλβῳ κυδιόων· μέγα δʼ ἵετο Κολχίδα γαῖαν 1.175. αὐτόν??τʼ Αἰήτην ἰδέειν σημάντορα Κόλχων. 1.176. Ἀστέριος δὲ καὶ Ἀμφίων Ὑπερασίου υἷες 1.177. Πελλήνης ἀφίκανον Ἀχαιίδος, ἥν ποτε Πέλλης 1.178. πατροπάτωρ ἐπόλισσεν ἐπʼ ὀφρύσιν Αἰγιαλοῖο. 1.179. Ταίναρον αὖτʼ ἐπὶ τοῖσι λιπὼν Εὔφημος ἵκανεν 1.180. τόν ῥα Ποσειδάωνι ποδωκηέστατον ἄλλων 1.181. Εὐρώπη Υιτυοῖο μεγασθενέος τέκε κούρη. 1.182. κεῖνος ἀνὴρ καὶ πόντου ἐπὶ γλαυκοῖο θέεσκεν 1.183. οἴδματος, οὐδὲ θοοὺς βάπτεν πόδας, ἀλλʼ ὅσον ἄκροις 1.184. ἴχνεσι τεγγόμενος διερῇ πεφόρητο κελεύθῳ. 1.185. καὶ δʼ ἄλλω δύο παῖδε Ποσειδάωνος ἵκοντο· 1.186. ἤτοι ὁ μὲν πτολίεθρον ἀγαυοῦ Μιλήτοιο 1.187. νοσφισθεὶς Ἐργῖνος, ὁ δʼ Ἰμβρασίης ἕδος Ἥρης 1.188. παρθενίην, Ἀγκαῖος ὑπέρβιος· ἴστορε δʼ ἄμφω 1.189. ἠμὲν ναυτιλίης ἠδʼ ἄρεος εὐχετόωντο. 1.190. Οἰνεΐδης δʼ ἐπὶ τοῖσιν ἀφορμηθεὶς Καλυδῶνος 1.191. ἀλκήεις Μελέαγρος ἀνήλυθε, Λαοκόων τε 1.192. Λαοκόων Οἰνῆος ἀδελφεός, οὐ μὲν ἰῆς γε 1.193. μητέρος· ἀλλά ἑ θῆσσα γυνὴ τέκε· τὸν μὲν ἄρʼ Οἰνεὺς 1.194. ἤδη γηραλέον κοσμήτορα παιδὸς ἴαλλεν· 1.195. ὧδʼ ἔτι κουρίζων περιθαρσέα δῦνεν ὅμιλον 1.196. ἡρώων. τοῦ δʼ οὔτινʼ ὑπέρτερον ἄλλον ὀίω 1.197. νόσφιν γʼ Ἡρακλῆος, ἐπελθέμεν, εἴ κʼ ἔτι μοῦνον 1.198. αὖθι μένων λυκάβαντα μετετράφη Αἰτωλοῖσιν. 1.199. καὶ μήν οἱ μήτρως αὐτὴν ὁδόν, εὖ μὲν ἄκοντι 1.200. εὖ δὲ καὶ ἐν σταδίῃ δεδαημένος ἀντιφέρεσθαι 1.201. Θεστιάδης Ἴφικλος ἐφωμάρτησε κιόντι. 1.202. σὺν δὲ Παλαιμόνιος Λέρνου πάις Ὠλενίοιο 1.203. Λέρνου ἐπίκλησιν, γενεήν γε μὲν Ἡφαίστοιο· 1.204. τούνεκʼ ἔην πόδα σιφλός· ἀτὰρ δέμας οὔ κέ τις ἔτλη 1.205. ἠνορέην τʼ ὀνόσασθαι, ὃ καὶ μεταρίθμιος ἦεν 1.206. πᾶσιν ἀριστήεσσιν, Ἰήσονι κῦδος ἀέξων. 1.207. ἐκ δʼ ἄρα Φωκήων κίεν Ἴφιτος Ὀρνυτίδαο 1.208. Ναυβόλου ἐκγεγαώς· ξεῖνος δέ οἱ ἔσκε πάροιθεν 1.209. ἦμος ἔβη Πυθώδε θεοπροπίας ἐρεείνων 1.210. ναυτιλίης· τόθι γάρ μιν ἑοῖς ὑπέδεκτο δόμοισιν. 1.211. Ζήτης αὖ Κάλαΐς τε Βορήιοι υἷες ἵκοντο 1.212. οὕς ποτʼ Ἐρεχθηὶς Βορέῃ τέκεν Ὠρείθυια 1.213. ἐσχατιῇ Θρῄκης δυσχειμέρου· ἔνθʼ ἄρα τήνγε 1.214. Θρηίκιος Βορέης ἀνερέψατο Κεκροπίηθεν 1.215. Ἰλισσοῦ προπάροιθε χορῷ ἔνι δινεύουσαν. 1.216. καί μιν ἄγων ἕκαθεν, Σαρπηδονίην ὅθι πέτρην 1.217. κλείουσιν, ποταμοῖο παρὰ ῥόον Ἐργίνοιο 1.218. λυγαίοις ἐδάμασσε περὶ νεφέεσσι καλύψας. 1.219. τὼ μὲν ἐπʼ ἀκροτάτοισι ποδῶν ἑκάτερθεν ἐρεμνὰς 1.220. σεῖον ἀειρομένω πτέρυγας, μέγα θάμβος ἰδέσθαι 1.221. χρυσείαις φολίδεσσι διαυγέας· ἀμφὶ δὲ νώτοις 1.222. κράατος ἐξ ὑπάτοιο καὶ αὐχένος ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα 1.223. κυάνεαι δονέοντο μετὰ πνοιῇσιν ἔθειραι. 1.224. οὐδὲ μὲν οὐδʼ αὐτοῖο πάις μενέαινεν Ἄκαστος 1.225. ἰφθίμου Πελίαο δόμοις ἔνι πατρὸς ἑῆος 1.226. μιμνάζειν, Ἄργος τε θεᾶς ὑποεργὸς Ἀθήνης· 1.227. ἀλλʼ ἄρα καὶ τὼ μέλλον ἐνικρινθῆναι ὁμίλῳ. 1.228. τόσσοι ἄρʼ Αἰσονίδῃ συμμήστορες ἠγερέθοντο. 1.229. τοὺς μὲν ἀριστῆας Μινύας περιναιετάοντες 1.230. κίκλησκον μάλα πάντας, ἐπεὶ Μινύαο θυγατρῶν 1.231. οἱ πλεῖστοι καὶ ἄριστοι ἀφʼ αἵματος εὐχετόωντο 1.232. ἔμμεναι· ὧς δὲ καὶ αὐτὸν Ἰήσονα γείνατο μήτηρ 1.233. Ἀλκιμέδη, Κλυμένης Μινυηίδος ἐκγεγαυῖα.
18. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.263, 7.614-7.817 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.263. For had your hands Minerva's gift profaned 7.614. and flings thick clouds in air. He, summoning 7.615. his chieftains, bade them on Latinus move 7.616. break peace, take arms, and, over Italy 7.617. their shields extending, to thrust forth her foe: 7.618. himself for Teucrian with Latin joined 7.619. was more than match. He called upon the gods 7.620. in witness of his vows: while, nothing loth 7.621. Rutulia's warriors rushed into array; 7.622. ome by his youth and noble beauty moved 7.624. While Turnus stirred Rutulia's valiant souls 7.625. Alecto on her Stygian pinions sped 7.626. to where the Teucrians lay. She scanned the ground 7.627. with eager guile, where by the river's marge 7.628. fair-browed Iulus with his nets and snares 7.629. rode fiercely to the chase. Then o'er his hounds 7.630. that hell-born virgin breathed a sudden rage 7.631. and filled each cunning nostril with the scent 7.632. of stags, till forth in wild pursuit they flew. 7.633. Here all the woe began, and here awoke 7.634. in rustic souls the swift-enkindling war. 7.635. For a fair stag, tall-antlered, stolen away 7.636. even from its mother's milk, had long been kept 7.637. by Tyrrhus and his sons—the shepherd he 7.638. of all the royal flocks, and forester 7.639. of a wide region round. With fondest care 7.640. their sister Silvia entwined its horns 7.641. with soft, fresh garlands, tamed it to run close 7.642. and combed the creature, or would bring to bathe 7.643. at a clear, crystal spring. It knew the hands 7.644. of all its gentle masters, and would feed 7.645. from their own dish; or wandering through the wood 7.646. come back unguided to their friendly door 7.647. though deep the evening shade. Iulus' dogs 7.648. now roused this wanderer in their ravening chase 7.649. as, drifted down-stream far from home it lay 7.650. on a green bank a-cooling. From bent bow 7.651. Ascanius, eager for a hunter's praise 7.652. let go his shaft; nor did Alecto fail 7.653. his aim to guide: but, whistling through the air 7.654. the light-winged reed pierced deep in flank and side. 7.655. Swift to its cover fled the wounded thing 7.656. and crept loud-moaning to its wonted stall 7.657. where, like a blood-stained suppliant, it seemed 7.658. to fill that shepherd's house with plaintive prayer. 7.659. Then Silvia the sister, smiting oft 7.660. on breast and arm, made cry for help, and called 7.661. the sturdy rustics forth in gathering throng. 7.662. These now (for in the silent forest couched 7.663. the cruel Fury) swift to battle flew. 7.664. One brandished a charred stake, another swung 7.665. a knotted cudgel, as rude anger shapes 7.666. its weapon of whate'er the searching eye 7.667. first haps to fall on. Tyrrhus roused his clans 7.668. just when by chance he split with blows of wedge 7.669. an oak in four; and, panting giant breath 7.670. houldered his woodman's axe. Alecto then 7.671. prompt to the stroke of mischief, soared aloft 7.672. from where she spying sate, to the steep roof 7.673. of a tall byre, and from its peak of straw 7.674. blew a wild signal on a shepherd's horn 7.675. outflinging her infernal note so far 7.676. that all the forest shuddered, and the grove 7.677. throbbed to its deepest glen. Cold Trivia's lake 7.678. from end to end gave ear, and every wave 7.679. of the white stream of Nar, the lonely pools 7.680. of still Velinus heard: while at the sound 7.681. pale mothers to their breasts their children drew. 7.682. Swift to the signal of the dreadful horn 7.683. natching their weapons rude, the freeborn swains 7.684. assembled for the fray; the Trojan bands 7.685. poured from their bivouac with instant aid 7.686. for young Ascanius. In array of war 7.687. both stand confronting. Not mere rustic brawl 7.688. with charred oak-staff and cudgel is the fight 7.689. but with the two-edged steel; the naked swords 7.690. wave like dark-bladed harvest-field, while far 7.691. the brazen arms flash in the smiting sun 7.692. and skyward fling their beam: so some wide sea 7.693. at first but whitened in the rising wind 7.694. wells its slow-rolling mass and ever higher 7.695. its billows rears, until the utmost deep 7.696. lifts in one surge to heaven. The first to fall 7.697. was Almo, eldest-born of Tyrrhus' sons 7.698. whom, striding in the van, a loud-winged shaft 7.699. laid low in death; deep in his throat it clung 7.700. and silenced with his blood the dying cry 7.701. of his frail life. Around him fell the forms 7.702. of many a brave and strong; among them died 7.703. gray-haired Galaesus pleading for a truce: 7.704. righteous he was, and of Ausonian fields 7.705. a prosperous master; five full flocks had he 7.706. of bleating sheep, and from his pastures came 7.707. five herds of cattle home; his busy churls 7.709. While o'er the battle-field thus doubtful swung 7.710. the scales of war, the Fury (to her task 7.711. now equal proven) having dyed the day 7.712. a deep-ensanguined hue, and opened fight 7.713. with death and slaughter, made no tarrying 7.714. within Hesperia, but skyward soared 7.715. and, Ioud in triumph, insolently thus 7.716. to Juno called: “See, at thy will, their strife 7.717. full-blown to war and woe! Could even thyself 7.718. command them now to truce and amity? 7.719. But I, that with Ausonia's blood befoul 7.720. their Trojan hands, yet more can do, if thou 7.721. hift not thy purpose. For with dire alarms 7.722. I will awake the bordering states to war 7.723. enkindling in their souls the frenzied lust 7.724. the war-god breathes; till from th' horizon round 7.725. the reinforcement pours—I scattering seeds 7.726. of carnage through the land.” In answer spoke 7.727. juno: “Enough of artifice and fear! 7.728. Thy provocation works. Now have they joined 7.729. in close and deadly combat, and warm blood 7.730. those sudden-leaping swords incarnadines 7.731. which chance put in their hands. Such nuptial joys 7.732. uch feast of wedlock, let the famous son 7.733. of Venus with the King Latinus share! 7.734. But yon Olympian Sire and King no more 7.735. permits thee freely in our skies to roam. 7.736. Go, quit the field! Myself will take control 7.737. of hazards and of labors yet to be.” 7.738. Thus Saturn's daughter spoke. Alecto then 7.739. unfolding far her hissing, viperous wings 7.740. turned toward her Stygian home, and took farewell 7.741. of upper air. Deep in Italia lies 7.742. a region mountain-girded, widely famed 7.743. and known in olden songs from land to land: 7.744. the valley of Amsanctus; deep, dark shades 7.745. enclose it between forest-walls, whereby 7.746. through thunderous stony channel serpentines 7.747. a roaring fall. Here in a monstrous cave 7.748. are breathing-holes of hell, a vast abyss 7.749. where Acheron opes wide its noisome jaws: 7.750. in this Alecto plunged, concealing so 7.751. her execrable godhead, while the air 7.753. Forthwith the sovereign hands of Juno haste 7.754. to consummate the war. The shepherds bear 7.755. back from the field of battle to the town 7.756. the bodies of the slain: young Almo's corse 7.757. and gray Galaesus' bleeding head. They call 7.758. just gods in heaven to Iook upon their wrong 7.759. and bid Latinus see it. Turnus comes 7.760. and, while the angry mob surveys the slain 7.761. adds fury to the hour. “Shall the land 7.762. have Trojan lords? Shall Phrygian marriages 7.763. debase our ancient, royal blood—and I 7.764. be spurned upon the threshold?” Then drew near 7.765. the men whose frenzied women-folk had held 7.766. bacchantic orgies in the pathless grove 7.767. awed by Amata's name: these, gathering 7.768. ued loud for war. Yea, all defied the signs 7.769. and venerable omens; all withstood 7.770. divine decrees, and clamored for revenge 7.771. prompted by evil powers. They besieged 7.772. the house of King Latinus, shouting-loud 7.773. with emulous rage. But like a sea-girt rock 7.774. unmoved he stood; like sea-girt rock when surge 7.775. of waters o'er it sweeps, or howling waves 7.776. urround; it keeps a ponderous front of power 7.777. though foaming cliffs around it vainly roar; 7.778. from its firm base the broken sea-weeds fall. 7.779. But when authority no whit could change 7.780. their counsels blind, and each event fulfilled 7.781. dread Juno's will, then with complaining prayer 7.782. the aged sire cried loud upon his gods 7.783. and on th' unheeding air: “Alas,” said he 7.784. “My doom is shipwreck, and the tempest bears 7.785. my bark away! O wretches, your own blood 7.786. hall pay the forfeit for your impious crime. 7.787. O Turnus! O abominable deed! 7.788. Avenging woes pursue thee; to deaf gods 7.789. thy late and unavailing prayer shall rise. 7.790. Now was my time to rest. But as I come 7.791. close to my journey's end, thou spoilest me 7.792. of comfort in my death.” With this the King 7.794. A sacred custom the Hesperian land 7.795. of Latium knew, by all the Alban hills 7.796. honored unbroken, which wide-ruling Rome 7.797. keeps to this day, when to new stroke she stirs 7.798. the might of Mars; if on the Danube 's wave 7.799. resolved to fling the mournful doom of war 7.800. or on the Caspian folk or Arabs wild; 7.801. or chase the morning far as India 's verge 7.802. ind from the Parthian despot wrest away 7.803. our banners Iost. Twin Gates of War there be 7.804. of fearful name, to Mars' fierce godhead vowed: 7.805. a hundred brass bars shut them, and the strength 7.806. of uncorrupting steel; in sleepless watch 7.807. Janus the threshold keeps. 'T is here, what time 7.808. the senate's voice is war, the consul grave 7.809. in Gabine cincture and Quirinal shift 7.810. himself the griding hinges backward moves 7.811. and bids the Romans arm; obedient then 7.812. the legionary host makes Ioud acclaim 7.813. and hoarse consent the brazen trumpets blow. 7.814. Thus King Latinus on the sons of Troy 7.815. was urged to open war, and backward roll 7.816. those gates of sorrow: but the aged king 7.817. recoiled, refused the loathsome task, and fled
19. Silius Italicus, Punica, 8.593-8.594 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 111



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
aegean sea, floating configuration of islands in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
aegean sea, mythical reformulation of in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
aeschylus, and tangible religious practice or objects Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 62, 63
aeschylus, creation of religious space in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78
aeschylus, delineating worshipping communities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78
aeschylus, formal (formulaic) shape of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 62, 63
aetiologies, specific, apollo and artemis (delos) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67
aetiology Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 53
age-class, age-set Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
aigina, aiginetans Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
amphiktyony Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
andros Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
aphrodite Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 26
apollo, delphinios Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
apollo, festival of (delian) Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23
apollo, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
apollo Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23, 24, 26; Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128; Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
apollo delios/dalios (delos), apollo delios, spread of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
apollo delios/dalios (delos), astypalaia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
apollo delios/dalios (delos), birth of (aetiology) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78
apollo delios/dalios (delos), despotiko Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
apollo delios/dalios (delos), inseparable from earlier artemis Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 60, 61, 62
apollo delios/dalios (delos), myth-ritual network of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
apollo delios/dalios (delos), songs for Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
apollo delios/dalios (delos) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
apollonius rhodius Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
architectural remains, sanctuaries Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
aretalogy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
aristides Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
artemis, amarysia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
artemis, at claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
artemis, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
artemis Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 26; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
asclepieum Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
asclepius, cult of Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
asteria (delos), astypalaia, delian pantheon on Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
asteria (delos) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
astypalaia, despotiko Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
astypalaia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
athena Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 26; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
athenian empire, and local identities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
athenian empire, as myth-ritual network Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
athenian empire, as theoric worshipping group Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
athenian empire Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
athens, its own theoria to delos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
attica Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
birth (mythical), as myth-ritual nexus Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67
catalogue of ships (homer, iliad Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
catalogues, see also lists\n, (in) tragedy Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
catchment area, of cults, constant (re)forging of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78, 83
cecrops Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
choregia, mythical past and ritual present merging in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
choreuts (dancers), narrators of, and actors in myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
choreuts (dancers), real-life counterparts of mythical protagonists Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
chorus, khoros, gender in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
chorus, khoros, of islands Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
coans Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
coins Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106
combat myth Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106
concept, forging theoric communities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
concept Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59
cos Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
cosmos, cosmogony, cosmography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
crete Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
cult Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
delian maidens Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
delos, and ionians Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
delos Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23, 24, 26; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
delphi Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23; Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52; Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
delphic amphictyony Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
demeter Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
diachronic vs. synchronic approaches to (greek) religion Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
diomedes Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
dionysus Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 26
dodona Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106
dorians Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
eleusis Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23
enūma eliš Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
epic catalogues, (of) troops Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
epic of etana Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
ethnos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
euripides Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
eurypylus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
foundation, of cults Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
functionalism, fused sense of communication (tambiah) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
genealogy Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
geography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
gods, attributive/ mythical descriptions Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23
gods, lists of Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201, 220
greeks Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
helios Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23
hera Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 26; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
heracles Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
hermes Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24, 26
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
herodotus Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
hesiod Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
historiography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201, 220
hodological space Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
homer, iliad Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
homer Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
homeric hymns, to apollo Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
hymns, motifs in Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24, 26
hymns, narrative structure of Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23, 24
hymns, opening and closure Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23
hymns Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201, 220
identity, general, local vs. central/panhellenic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
inspiration Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
insular, local, in theoria Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 83
ionians Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
islands, in the aegean, athenian settlement of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
islands, in the aegean, in delian league Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
islands, in the aegean, networking Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 60
islands, in the aegean, theoria to delos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
islands, in the aegean Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
lemnos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
lesbos, and early delian league Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
lesbos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
leto, giving birth to apollo and artemis on delos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78
leto Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
localism Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
lycomedes Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
machaon Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
merging in choral performance Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
meropes Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
merops Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
miletus, and delos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
miletus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
mount olympus Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
mousike, music, delos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59
mt olympus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
muse Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 53
mykale (battle of) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
myth-ritual nexus, ritual moment Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 63, 64, 65, 66, 67
myth Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
narration Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23, 24; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
naxos, naxians, and delian theoria Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 60, 61, 78
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), (re) formulation of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), flexible system of interaction Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), forging of in song (aegean) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
network, of myths and rituals (also myth-ritual web, grid, framework), keeping out of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
odysseus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
oechalia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
ololyge Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 63, 64, 65
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 53
olympus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
oracle Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
ovid Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
paeans for delos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 83
panhellenic Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
panhellenism Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52, 53
paradigm Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
paros, and delian theoria Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
performance, aesthetic appeal of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
performance, fused sense of communication/synaesthesia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
performances of myth and ritual (also song), (re)creating religious spaces Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78
performances of myth and ritual (also song), (re)creation of worshipping groups Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
performances of myth and ritual (also song), and social and power relations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
performances of myth and ritual (also song), blending mythical past and ritual present Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
performances of myth and ritual (also song), reconfiguring mythical time in relation to ritual spaces Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78
pergamum Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
persian wars Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
personification of abstract notions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
philoctetes Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
phokaia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
piedmont, olbos in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 62
place, religious, transcendence of in myth-ritual performances Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
podalirius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
poeas Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
punishment, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 53
pythia Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
real world\n, (of) divine appellations/attributes Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
real world\n, (of) names Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
real world\n, (of/on/generating new) lists Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
religion, greek, intrinsic power of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59
religion, greek, universal expressions of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 62
rheneia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
ritual, construing worshipping groups Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
ritual, creative, not static Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
rivalry Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106
samos, grouped with chios and lesbos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78, 83
samothrace Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
scyrus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
simonides, delian paeans Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 63, 64, 65, 66, 67
skyros Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
song-culture, narrative vs. performative part in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 65
songlines Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
space, religious, forging of through myth-ritual performances Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
space, religious, malleable and constantly changing Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
space, religious, transformation of long-term shared (theoric) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59
speech, between god and poet Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 23
tambiah, s., performative dimension of ritual Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 67
teiresias Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
teuthrania Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
theoria, and local identities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
theoria, as myth-ritual network Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78, 83
theoria, as network, general Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78, 83
theoria, as system of power relations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
theoria, choral polis-theoria Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
theoria, different from politico-military alliances Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 83
theoria, general Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
theoria, inter-state relations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 83
theoria, maritime Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59
theoria, patterns reworked over time (delos) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59
theoria, sense of community Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 83
thera Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 78
thetis Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
thucydides Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
time, transcendance of, in myth-ritual performances Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67
tragedy, interacting with choral poetry Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 63, 66
travelogue Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
tribes, names Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
tribes, pre-kleisthenic Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 541
triopas Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
trojan war Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
trojans Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
troy Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 55
virgil Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 201
visibility Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 53
von wilamowitz-möllendorff, ulrich Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128
votives' Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
zeus, olympian Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63
zeus Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 26; Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 128; Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106