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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6693
Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 301-374


nanBright chariots will clash nor any steed


nanNear your fine altar at a rapid speed.


nanNo, glorious tribes of mortal men will leave


nanGifts to you as ‘Hail-Healer’; you’ll receive


nanRich sacrifices which will please you well


nanFrom those who round about these regions dwell.


nanThus she got the Far-Shooter to agree


nanThat she should have renown there, and not he.


nanFurther you went, Apollo, coming then


nanTo where the Phlegyae dwell, presumptuous men


nanBy the Cephisian lake in a fair glade


nanTaking no note of Zeus. You quickly made


nanYour way to Crisa then, which lies below


nanThe mountain of Parnassus, white with snow


nanA foothill facing west – above, a bluff


nanHangs over it, beneath, a valley, rough


nanAnd hollow. Lord Phoebus Apollo planned


nanTo build his lovely temple on this land.


nanHe said: “I’ll build my lovely temple here


nanAn oracle for men, who will come near


nanWith perfect hecatombs, those who reside


nanIn rich Peloponnesus or abide


nanIn Europe and upon the isles, and I


nanWill give to all honest advice in my


nanRich temple.” Speaking thus, Apollo laid


nanAll the foundations out and these he made


nanBoth wide and very long. Trephoniu


nanAnd Agamedes, sons of Erginus


nanDear to the gods, laid down a pediment


nanOf stone on them, and countless different


nanTribes built the shrine with polished stones to be


nanSung evermore. In this vicinity


nanWas a sweet spring, where with his mighty bow


nanThe lord Apollo, son of Zeus, laid low


nanThe bloated, great she-dragon who wrought deep


nanDistress upon the men and their lean sheep –


nanA bloody torment. She of the gold throne


nanHera, once gave her fierce, fell Typhaon


nanWhom she brought up to be a plague to men.


nanHera had borne him, being angry then


nanWith Father Zeus when he bore in his head


nanGlorious Athena. Queenly Hera said


nanIn anger to the gods who had amassed:


nan“Hear me! Cloud-Gathering Father Zeus has cast


nanDishonour on me whom he made his wife


nanHis faithful wife. For he has given life


nanTo the grey-eyed Athena, far from me


nan(She is the paramount divinity).


nanMy son Hephaestus, though, is frail and lame


nanAmong the gods, which causes me great shame.


nanI picked him up and into the wide sea


nanI cast the lad. But Nereus’ progeny


nanSilver-shod Thetis, took him in her care


nanWith all her sisters. Oh, if only there


nanHad been some other service she had done


nanFor the blest gods. Oh, wretched, crafty one


nanWhat will you think up now? How could you bear


nanGrey-eyed Athena all alone? How dare


nanYou do it? Could not I? For after all


nanThe gods who live on Mount Olympus call


nanMe Zeus’s wife. Watch out in case I hatch


nanSome trick against you that will be a match


nanTo yours. In fact I will! Yes, I’ll devise


nanTo bear a child who in Olympian eye


nanWill top them all. Nor will I shame our bond


nanOf holy wedlock. I’ll consort, beyond


nanOur house, with all the gods. I will not lie


nanWith you.” She spoke and from the gods on high


nanShe went in anger. Then she smote the land


nanDid cow-eyed Hera, with the flat of her hand


nanAnd prayed: “Earth, Heaven, Titan gods as well


nanWho in great Tartarus beneath us dwell


nanWhich spawns both men and gods, listen to me.


nanGrant me a child, apart from Zeus, and see


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 15.87-15.95, 20.4-20.6 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

15.87. /the immortal gods gathered together in the house of Zeus, and at sight of her they all sprang up, and greeted her with cups of welcome. She on her part let be the others, but took the cup from Themis, of the fair cheeks, for she ran first to meet her, and spake, and addressed her with winged words: 15.88. /the immortal gods gathered together in the house of Zeus, and at sight of her they all sprang up, and greeted her with cups of welcome. She on her part let be the others, but took the cup from Themis, of the fair cheeks, for she ran first to meet her, and spake, and addressed her with winged words: 15.89. /the immortal gods gathered together in the house of Zeus, and at sight of her they all sprang up, and greeted her with cups of welcome. She on her part let be the others, but took the cup from Themis, of the fair cheeks, for she ran first to meet her, and spake, and addressed her with winged words: 15.90. / Hera, wherefore art thou come? Thou art as one distraught. In good sooth the son of Cronos hath affrighted thee, he thine own husband. Then made answer to her, the goddess, white-armed Hera:Ask me not at large concerning this, O goddess Themis; of thyself thou knowest what manner of mood is his, how over-haughty and unbending. 15.91. / Hera, wherefore art thou come? Thou art as one distraught. In good sooth the son of Cronos hath affrighted thee, he thine own husband. Then made answer to her, the goddess, white-armed Hera:Ask me not at large concerning this, O goddess Themis; of thyself thou knowest what manner of mood is his, how over-haughty and unbending. 15.92. / Hera, wherefore art thou come? Thou art as one distraught. In good sooth the son of Cronos hath affrighted thee, he thine own husband. Then made answer to her, the goddess, white-armed Hera:Ask me not at large concerning this, O goddess Themis; of thyself thou knowest what manner of mood is his, how over-haughty and unbending. 15.93. / Hera, wherefore art thou come? Thou art as one distraught. In good sooth the son of Cronos hath affrighted thee, he thine own husband. Then made answer to her, the goddess, white-armed Hera:Ask me not at large concerning this, O goddess Themis; of thyself thou knowest what manner of mood is his, how over-haughty and unbending. 15.94. / Hera, wherefore art thou come? Thou art as one distraught. In good sooth the son of Cronos hath affrighted thee, he thine own husband. Then made answer to her, the goddess, white-armed Hera:Ask me not at large concerning this, O goddess Themis; of thyself thou knowest what manner of mood is his, how over-haughty and unbending. 15.95. /Nay, do thou begin for the gods the equal feast in the halls, and this shalt thou hear amid all the immortals, even what manner of evil deeds Zeus declareth. In no wise, methinks, will it delight in like manner the hearts of all, whether mortals or gods, if so be any even now still feasteth with a joyful mind. 20.4. / 20.4. /So by the beaked ships around thee, O son of Peleus, insatiate of fight, the Achaeans arrayed them for battle; and likewise the Trojans over against them on the rising ground of the plain. But Zeus bade Themis summon the gods to the place of gathering from the 20.5. / 20.5. /So by the beaked ships around thee, O son of Peleus, insatiate of fight, the Achaeans arrayed them for battle; and likewise the Trojans over against them on the rising ground of the plain. But Zeus bade Themis summon the gods to the place of gathering from the 20.5. /brow of many-ribbed Olympus; and she sped everywhither, and bade them come to the house of Zeus. There was no river that came not, save only Oceanus, nor any nymph, of all that haunt the fair copses, the springs that feed the rivers, and the grassy meadows. 20.6. /brow of many-ribbed Olympus; and she sped everywhither, and bade them come to the house of Zeus. There was no river that came not, save only Oceanus, nor any nymph, of all that haunt the fair copses, the springs that feed the rivers, and the grassy meadows.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 2.68, 9.112-9.114 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 101-199, 20, 200-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-279, 28, 280-289, 29, 290-299, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-512, 52-100 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

100. A word – you’ll not be harmed in any way.
4. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-219, 22, 220-229, 23, 230-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-269, 27, 270-279, 28, 280-289, 29, 290-299, 3, 30, 300, 302-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 4, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 5, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-544, 55-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

1. Apollo, the Far-Shooter, I’ll recall
5. Hymn To Apollo, To Apollo, 332-520, 331 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

6. Hymn To Apollo (Homeric Hymn 21), To Apollo, 217-299, 30, 300-309, 31, 310-319, 32, 320-329, 33, 330-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-379, 38, 380-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-544, 55-87, 216 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 10-11, 2-9, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. πρῶτον μὲν εὐχῇ τῇδε πρεσβεύω θεῶν 1. First, in this prayer of mine, I give the place of highest honor among the gods to the first prophet, Earth; and after her to Themis, for she was the second to take this oracular seat of her mother, as legend tells.
8. Euripides, Hecuba, 71, 70 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

70. δείμασι, φάσμασιν; ὦ πότνια Χθών 70. fearful visions of the night? O lady Earth, mother of dreams that fly on sable wings! I am seeking to avert the vision of the night, the sight of horror which I learned from my dream
9. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1235-1284, 1234 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 140 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. New Testament, Apocalypse, 12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.14.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.14.10. On what is called the Gaeum (sanctuary of Earth) is an altar of Earth; it too is of ashes. In more ancient days they say that there was an oracle also of Earth in this place. On what is called the Stomium (Mouth) the altar to Themis has been built. All round the altar of Zeus Descender runs a fence; this altar is near the great altar made of the ashes. The reader must remember that the altars have not been enumerated in the order in which they stand, but the order followed by my narrative is that followed by the Eleans in their sacrifices. By the sacred enclosure of Pelops is an altar of Dionysus and the Graces in common; between them is an altar of the Muses, and next to these an altar of the Nymphs.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegeus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 57
apollo Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24; Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109; Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106, 107; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
aretalogy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
artemis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
athena Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
coins Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106
combat myth Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106, 107
cult Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
declamation Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
delos Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
delphi Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106, 107; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
demeter Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
dionysus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
dodona Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106, 107
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 57
fear Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
foundation, of cults Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
hercules Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
hermes Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
hymns, motifs in Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
hymns, narrative structure of Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
inspiration Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
juno Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
jupiter Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
leto Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
monster Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
mount olympus Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
mt olympus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
myth Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
narration Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 24
olympus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
orphism Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
panhellenism Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
paternity Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
personification of abstract notions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
power Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
pythia Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 57; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 52
pythia (see priestesses) Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 107
python Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 57
recognition Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
rhetoric Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
rivalry Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106, 107
themis, themis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 57
throne Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 109
tripods and divination, at delphi' Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 57
zeus Lester, Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5 (2018) 106, 107