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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 9.250-9.409


αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ δὴ σπεῦσε πονησάμενος τὰ ἃ ἔργαThen after he'd quickly done his work, right then he lit a fire, caught sight of us, and asked: 'Who are you, strangers? From where did you sail the watery ways? On some business, or did you roam at random, even as pirates over the sea, who roam
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ψυχὰς παρθέμενοι κακὸν ἀλλοδαποῖσι φέροντες;and risk their lives, and bring evil to foreigners?' “So said he, and in turn our dear heart snapped in fear of his deep voice and monstrous body. But even so, I said to him in answer: 'We're Achaeans, driven off course from Troy
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παντοίοις ἀνέμοισιν ὑπὲρ μέγα λαῖτμα θαλάσσηςby all kinds of winds over the great gulf of the sea, and on our way home we took a different route, wrong ways, as I suppose Zeus wished to contrive it. We claim we're people of Atreides Agamemnon, whose fame is now greatest under heaven
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τόσσην γὰρ διέπερσε πόλιν καὶ ἀπώλεσε λαοὺςfor he sacked so great a city and destroyed many men. Now we've reached your knees in supplication, in hope you'll give some guest gift or even in a different way give a present, which is the right of strangers. But revere the gods, most noble one. We are supplicants to you.
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Ζεὺς δʼ ἐπιτιμήτωρ ἱκετάων τε ξείνων τεZeus is the avenger of supplicants and strangers, the guest god, who attends venerable strangers.' “So said I, and he answered me at once with a ruthless heart: 'Stranger, you're a fool, or come from far away, to bid me to either avoid or fear the gods
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οὐ γὰρ Κύκλωπες Διὸς αἰγιόχου ἀλέγουσινfor Cyclopes don't heed aegis-bearer Zeusor the blessed gods, since, indeed, we are far better. I wouldn't avoid Zeus' hatred, and spare either you or your comrades, unless my heart bid me. But tell me where you moored your ship when you came here
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ἤ που ἐπʼ ἐσχατιῆς, ἦ καὶ σχεδόν, ὄφρα δαείω.at the border, perhaps, or just nearby, so I'll know it.' “So said he, testing me, but with my great experience I didn't miss it, instead, with guileful words, I said back to him: 'Earth-shaker Poseidon shattered my ship, throwing it against the rocks at the border of your land
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ἄκρῃ προσπελάσας· ἄνεμος δʼ ἐκ πόντου ἔνεικεν·driving it against headland, and wind from the sea took it. But, with the ones here, I escaped sheer destruction.' “So said I, but with a ruthless heart, he answered me nothing, instead, he sprang up and threw his hands upon my comrades, grabbed two at once and dashed them, like puppies
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κόπτʼ· ἐκ δʼ ἐγκέφαλος χαμάδις ῥέε, δεῦε δὲ γαῖαν.to the ground. Brain flowed out on the ground and wet the earth. He cut through them, limb from limb, and prepared dinner. He ate, like a mountain-bred lion, and left nothing, entrails, flesh, and marrowy bones. We held our hands up to Zeus and wailed, when we saw
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σχέτλια ἔργʼ ὁρόωντες, ἀμηχανίη δʼ ἔχε θυμόν.his reckless deeds, and helplessness took hold of our hearts. Then after the Cyclops had filled his great stomach, eating human meat and drinking unmixed milk on top of it, he lay inside the cave and stretched out among the sheep. I planned in my great-hearted heart
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ἆσσον ἰών, ξίφος ὀξὺ ἐρυσσάμενος παρὰ μηροῦto get closer to him, draw my sharp sword from beside my thigh, and stab him in the chest, where the midriff holds the liver, feeling for it with my hand. But a second thought restrained me, for, where we were, we too would perish in sheer destruction, since we would not be able, with our hands, to push
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χερσὶν ἀπώσασθαι λίθον ὄβριμον, ὃν προσέθηκεν.from the lofty door the mighty stone he'd put there. So then, with groans, we awaited divine Dawn. “When early-born rose-fingered Dawn appeared, right then he lit a fire and milked his famous sheep, completely properly, and under each he pushed its young.
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αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ δὴ σπεῦσε πονησάμενος τὰ ἃ ἔργαThen after he'd quickly done his work, he again grabbed two at once and prepared breakfast. He ate his meal and drove his fat sheep from the cave and easily removed the great door rock. But then at once he put it in place, as if he were putting a lid in place on a quiver.
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πολλῇ δὲ ῥοίζῳ πρὸς ὄρος τρέπε πίονα μῆλαWith much whistling, the Cyclops turned his fat sheeptoward the mountains. Then I was left, deeply contemplating evil, in hope I'd somehow make him pay and Athena'd grant me glory. And in my heart this plan seemed best. For Cyclops' big club lay beside the pen
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χλωρὸν ἐλαΐνεον· τὸ μὲν ἔκταμεν, ὄφρα φοροίηa green one of olive wood that he'd cut, to carry when it dried. We looked at it and made it out to be as big as the mast of a black ship with twenty oars, a wide cargo ship that goes out on the great gulf, such was it in length, such in thickness, to behold.
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τοῦ μὲν ὅσον τʼ ὄργυιαν ἐγὼν ἀπέκοψα παραστὰςI stood next to it, cut off a fathom's length, set it next to my comrades, and bid them taper it. They made it smooth, as I stood by and sharpened the end, then I quickly took and hardened it in burning fire and put it well away, hiding it under dung
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ἥ ῥα κατὰ σπείους κέχυτο μεγάλʼ ἤλιθα πολλή·which in exceedingly great amount was spread throughout the cave. Then I ordered the others to cast lots to see who'd dare to lift the stake with me to grind it in his eye when sweet sleep came upon him. They chose by lot the ones I myself would have wanted chosen
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τέσσαρες, αὐτὰρ ἐγὼ πέμπτος μετὰ τοῖσιν ἐλέγμην.four of them, then I counted fifth among them. He came at evening, herding his fine-fleeced sheepand at once drove his fat sheep into the wide cave, all of them, and left none in the deep courtyard outside, either suspecting something or as a god so bid him.
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αὐτὰρ ἔπειτʼ ἐπέθηκε θυρεὸν μέγαν ὑψόσʼ ἀείραςBut then he lifted high and put in place the big door rock, sat, and milked the sheep and bleating goats, completely properly, and under each he pushed its young. Then after he'd quickly done his work, he again grabbed two at once and prepared dinner.
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καὶ τότʼ ἐγὼ Κύκλωπα προσηύδων ἄγχι παραστάςRight then I went close and spoke to the Cyclops, holding a wooden cup of black wine in my hands: 'Cyclops, take it, drink the wine, after you've eaten human meat, so you can see what kind of drink our ship contained. I brought it for you now as a libation, that you would pity me
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οἴκαδε πέμψειας· σὺ δὲ μαίνεαι οὐκέτʼ ἀνεκτῶς.and send me home, but now you're intolerably angry. Reckless one, why would anyone else, of multitudes of men, ever come to you later, since you haven't acted properly?' “So said I, and he took and drank it, and was terribly pleased drinking the sweet drink, and in turn asked me for seconds:
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δός μοι ἔτι πρόφρων, καί μοι τεὸν οὔνομα εἰπὲ'Give me some more, freely, and tell me your name right now, so I can give you a guest gift which you'll enjoy, since for Cyclopes the grain-giving earth bears clusters of grapes for wine, and Zeus's rain makes them grow for them, but this is like a bit of ambrosia and nectar!'
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ὣς φάτʼ, ἀτάρ οἱ αὖτις ἐγὼ πόρον αἴθοπα οἶνον.“So said he, then I handed him in turn the sparkling wine. Three times I brought and gave it and three times he drank in folly. Then after the wine had gone around the Cyclops' mind, right then I spoke to him with words meant to win him: 'You ask me my famous name, Cyclops? Then I'll tell you
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ἐξερέω· σὺ δέ μοι δὸς ξείνιον, ὥς περ ὑπέστης.but give me a guest gift, just as you promised. My name is Nobody. And they call me Nobody, my mother and father and all my comrades as well.' “So said I, and he answered me at once with a ruthless heart: 'I'll eat Nobody last among his comrades
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τοὺς δʼ ἄλλους πρόσθεν· τὸ δέ τοι ξεινήιον ἔσται.and the others before him. That'll be my guest gift to you.' “He spoke, leaned back, fell on his back, then afterwards lay, thick neck drooping, and sleep, the tamer of all, seized him. Wine, and bits of human flesh, burst from his gullet, and, drunk with wine, he belched.
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καὶ τότʼ ἐγὼ τὸν μοχλὸν ὑπὸ σποδοῦ ἤλασα πολλῆςRight then I drove the stake under deep ashes until it got hot, and with words encouraged all my comrades, lest any of mine flinch in fear. But when, before long, the olive-wood stake in the fire, green as it was, was about to catch fire and glowed terribly
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καὶ τότʼ ἐγὼν ἆσσον φέρον ἐκ πυρός, ἀμφὶ δʼ ἑταῖροιright then I brought it nearer, out of the fire, and my comrades stood about me. Then a divinity breathed great confidence in us. While they lifted the olive-wood stake, sharp at the end, and thrust him in his eye, I pressed my weight from above and twisted it, as when some man bores a ship's plank
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τρυπάνῳ, οἱ δέ τʼ ἔνερθεν ὑποσσείουσιν ἱμάντιwith an auger, while others below rotate it with a strap they clasp at either end, so it always runs continuously. So we took the fire-sharpened stake and twisted it in his eye, and blood, hot as it was, flowed around it. The breath of his burning pupil singed all around his eyelid
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γλήνης καιομένης, σφαραγεῦντο δέ οἱ πυρὶ ῥίζαι.and eyebrows, and the roots of his eye crackled with fire. As when a smith man plunges a big axe or adze in cold water to temper it, and it hisses greatly, for this is how it has again the strength of iron, so his eye sizzled around the olive-wood stake.
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σμερδαλέον δὲ μέγʼ ᾤμωξεν, περὶ δʼ ἴαχε πέτρηHe let out a great horrifying cry, the rock echoed, and we scurried off in fear. He pulled the stake, stained with lots of blood, out of his eye, then, in a frenzy, threw it from him with his hands, and called loudly to the Cyclopes who lived
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ᾤκεον ἐν σπήεσσι διʼ ἄκριας ἠνεμοέσσας.about him in caves along the windy hilltops. They heard his cry, came from one place or another, stood around his cave, and asked what distressed him: 'What's hurt you so, Polyphemus, that you've cried out this way, through the ambrosial night and made us sleepless?
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ἦ μή τίς σευ μῆλα βροτῶν ἀέκοντος ἐλαύνει;No one mortal drives away your sheep, against your will, does he? No one's killing you, by guile or violence, is he?' “From his cave mighty Polyphemus said back to them: 'My friends! Nobody is killing me, by guile and not by violence!' “They spoke winged words in reply:
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 27.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

27.8. וְאֶל־בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל תְּדַבֵּר לֵאמֹר אִישׁ כִּי־יָמוּת וּבֵן אֵין לוֹ וְהַעֲבַרְתֶּם אֶת־נַחֲלָתוֹ לְבִתּוֹ׃ 27.8. And thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel, saying: If a man die, and have no son, then ye shall cause his inheritance to pass unto his daughter."
2. Archilochus, Fragments, 42 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Archilochus, Fragments, 42 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Homer, Iliad, 13.5-13.6 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

13.5. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.5. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.6. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans.
5. Homer, Odyssey, 1.30-1.43, 1.325-1.327, 3.130-3.198, 4.332-4.586, 5.263-5.379, 6.120, 9.39-9.61, 9.64-9.75, 9.79-9.144, 9.147-9.148, 9.159-9.162, 9.166, 9.172-9.176, 9.183, 9.187-9.192, 9.197, 9.210-9.211, 9.217, 9.219, 9.224-9.228, 9.231-9.234, 9.236, 9.243, 9.251-9.416, 9.422, 9.428, 9.430-9.432, 9.440-9.441, 9.444-9.445, 9.447-9.460, 9.467-9.468, 9.475-9.479, 9.500, 9.504, 9.508-9.510, 9.515, 9.517-9.536, 9.545, 9.550-9.555, 9.557, 10.1-10.31, 10.80-10.132, 10.170-10.215, 10.307-10.374, 11.387-11.464, 12.166-12.200, 12.208-12.220, 12.233-12.259, 13.383-13.385, 24.19-24.97 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Cyclops, 607, 606 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

606. ἢ τὴν τύχην μὲν δαίμον' ἡγεῖσθαι χρεών
7. Herodotus, Histories, 4.65 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.65. The heads themselves, not all of them but those of their bitterest enemies, they treat this way. Each saws off all the part beneath the eyebrows, and cleans the rest. If he is a poor man, then he covers the outside with a piece of raw hide, and so makes use of it; but if he is rich, he covers the head with the raw hide, and gilds the inside of it and uses it for a drinking-cup. ,Such a cup a man also makes out of the head of his own kinsman with whom he has been feuding, and whom he has defeated in single combat before the king; and if guests whom he honors visit him he will serve them with these heads, and show how the dead were his kinsfolk who fought him and were beaten by him; this they call manly valor.
8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.242-1.249, 1.602, 3.4-3.5, 3.294-3.505 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.242. Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched 1.243. the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there 1.244. torm-buffeted, might sail within his ken 1.245. with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners 1.246. or Capys or Caicus armor-clad 1.247. upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; 1.248. but while he looks, three stags along the shore 1.249. come straying by, and close behind them comes 1.602. leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; 3.4. in smouldering ash lay level with the ground 3.5. to wandering exile then and regions wild 3.294. or ken our way. Three days of blinding dark 3.295. three nights without a star, we roved the seas; 3.296. The fourth, land seemed to rise. Far distant hills 3.297. and rolling smoke we saw. Down came our sails 3.298. out flew the oars, and with prompt stroke the crews 3.299. wept the dark waves and tossed the crested foam. 3.300. From such sea-peril safe, I made the shores 3.301. of Strophades,—a name the Grecians gave 3.302. to islands in the broad Ionic main, — 3.303. the Strophades, where dread Celaeno bides 3.304. with other Harpies, who had quit the halls 3.305. of stricken Phineus, and for very fear 3.306. fled from the routed feast; no prodigy 3.307. more vile than these, nor plague more pitiless 3.308. ere rose by wrath divine from Stygian wave; 3.309. birds seem they, but with face like woman-kind; 3.310. foul-flowing bellies, hands with crooked claws 3.311. and ghastly lips they have, with hunger pale. 3.312. Scarce had we made the haven, when, behold! 3.313. Fair herds of cattle roaming a wide plain 3.314. and horned goats, untended, feeding free 3.315. in pastures green, surprised our happy eyes. 3.316. with eager blades we ran to take and slay 3.317. asking of every god, and chicfly Jove 3.318. to share the welcome prize: we ranged a feast 3.319. with turf-built couches and a banquet-board 3.320. along the curving strand. But in a trice 3.321. down from the high hills swooping horribly 3.322. the Harpies loudly shrieking, flapped their wings 3.323. natched at our meats, and with infectious touch 3.324. polluted all; infernal was their cry 3.325. the stench most vile. Once more in covert far 3.326. beneath a caverned rock, and close concealed 3.327. with trees and branching shade, we raised aloft 3.328. our tables, altars, and rekindled fires. 3.329. Once more from haunts unknown the clamorous flock 3.330. from every quarter flew, and seized its prey 3.331. with taloned feet and carrion lip most foul. 3.332. I called my mates to arms and opened war 3.333. on that accursed brood. My band obeyed; 3.334. and, hiding in deep grass their swords and shields 3.335. in ambush lay. But presently the foe 3.336. wept o'er the winding shore with loud alarm : 3.337. then from a sentry-crag, Misenus blew 3.338. a signal on his hollow horn. My men 3.339. flew to the combat strange, and fain would wound 3.340. with martial steel those foul birds of the sea; 3.341. but on their sides no wounding blade could fall 3.342. nor any plume be marred. In swiftest flight 3.343. to starry skies they soared, and left on earth 3.344. their half-gnawed, stolen feast, and footprints foul. 3.345. Celaeno only on a beetling crag 3.346. took lofty perch, and, prophetess of ill 3.347. hrieked malediction from her vulture breast: 3.348. “Because of slaughtered kine and ravished herd 3.349. ons of Laomedon, have ye made war? 3.350. And will ye from their rightful kingdom drive 3.351. the guiltless Harpies? Hear, O, hear my word 3.352. (Long in your bosoms may it rankle sore!) 3.353. which Jove omnipotent to Phoebus gave 3.354. Phoebus to me: a word of doom, which I 3.355. the Furies' elder sister, here unfold: 3.356. ‘To Italy ye fare. The willing winds 3.357. your call have heard; and ye shall have your prayer 3.358. in some Italian haven safely moored. 3.359. But never shall ye rear the circling walls 3.360. of your own city, till for this our blood 3.361. by you unjustly spilt, your famished jaws 3.363. She spoke: her pinions bore her to the grove 3.364. and she was seen no more. But all my band 3.365. huddered with shock of fear in each cold vein; 3.366. their drooping spirits trusted swords no more 3.367. but turned to prayers and offerings, asking grace 3.368. carce knowing if those creatures were divine 3.369. or but vast birds, ill-omened and unclean. 3.370. Father Anchises to the gods in heaven 3.371. uplifted suppliant hands, and on that shore 3.372. due ritual made, crying aloud; “Ye gods 3.373. avert this curse, this evil turn away! 3.374. Smile, Heaven, upon your faithful votaries.” 3.375. Then bade he launch away, the chain undo 3.376. et every cable free and spread all sail. 3.377. O'er the white waves we flew, and took our way 3.378. where'er the helmsman or the winds could guide. 3.379. Now forest-clad Zacynthus met our gaze 3.380. engirdled by the waves; Dulichium 3.381. ame, and Neritos, a rocky steep 3.382. uprose. We passed the cliffs of Ithaca 3.383. that called Laertes king, and flung our curse 3.384. on fierce Ulysses' hearth and native land. 3.385. nigh hoar Leucate's clouded crest we drew 3.386. where Phoebus' temple, feared by mariners 3.387. loomed o'er us; thitherward we steered and reached 3.388. the little port and town. Our weary fleet 3.390. So, safe at land, our hopeless peril past 3.391. we offered thanks to Jove, and kindled high 3.392. his altars with our feast and sacrifice; 3.393. then, gathering on Actium 's holy shore 3.394. made fair solemnities of pomp and game. 3.395. My youth, anointing their smooth, naked limbs 3.396. wrestled our wonted way. For glad were we 3.397. who past so many isles of Greece had sped 3.398. and 'scaped our circling foes. Now had the sun 3.399. rolled through the year's full circle, and the waves 3.400. were rough with icy winter's northern gales. 3.401. I hung for trophy on that temple door 3.402. a swelling shield of brass (which once was worn 3.403. by mighty Abas) graven with this line: 3.404. SPOIL OF AENEAS FROM TRIUMPHANT FOES. 3.405. Then from that haven I command them forth; 3.406. my good crews take the thwarts, smiting the sea 3.407. with rival strokes, and skim the level main. 3.408. Soon sank Phaeacia's wind-swept citadels 3.409. out of our view; we skirted the bold shores 3.410. of proud Epirus, in Chaonian land 3.412. Here wondrous tidings met us, that the son 3.413. of Priam, Helenus, held kingly sway 3.414. o'er many Argive cities, having wed 3.415. the Queen of Pyrrhus, great Achilles' son 3.416. and gained his throne; and that Andromache 3.417. once more was wife unto a kindred lord. 3.418. Amazement held me; all my bosom burned 3.419. to see the hero's face and hear this tale 3.420. of strange vicissitude. So up I climbed 3.421. leaving the haven, fleet, and friendly shore. 3.422. That self-same hour outside the city walls 3.423. within a grove where flowed the mimic stream 3.424. of a new Simois, Andromache 3.425. with offerings to the dead, and gifts of woe 3.426. poured forth libation, and invoked the shade 3.427. of Hector, at a tomb which her fond grief 3.428. had consecrated to perpetual tears 3.429. though void; a mound of fair green turf it stood 3.430. and near it rose twin altars to his name. 3.431. She saw me drawing near; our Trojan helms 3.432. met her bewildered eyes, and, terror-struck 3.433. at the portentous sight, she swooning fell 3.434. and lay cold, rigid, lifeless, till at last 3.435. carce finding voice, her lips addressed me thus : 3.436. “Have I true vision? Bringest thou the word 3.437. of truth, O goddess-born? Art still in flesh? 3.438. Or if sweet light be fled, my Hector, where?” 3.439. With flood of tears she spoke, and all the grove 3.440. reechoed to her cry. Scarce could I frame 3.441. brief answer to her passion, but replied 3.442. with broken voice and accents faltering: 3.443. “I live, 't is true. I lengthen out my days 3.444. through many a desperate strait. But O, believe 3.445. that what thine eyes behold is vision true. 3.446. Alas! what lot is thine, that wert unthroned 3.447. from such a husband's side? What after-fate 3.448. could give thee honor due? Andromache 3.450. With drooping brows and lowly voice she cried : 3.451. “O, happy only was that virgin blest 3.452. daughter of Priam, summoned forth to die 3.453. in sight of Ilium, on a foeman's tomb! 3.454. No casting of the lot her doom decreed 3.455. nor came she to her conqueror's couch a slave. 3.456. Myself from burning Ilium carried far 3.457. o'er seas and seas, endured the swollen pride 3.458. of that young scion of Achilles' race 3.459. and bore him as his slave a son. When he 3.460. ued for Hermione, of Leda's line 3.461. and nuptial-bond with Lacedaemon's Iords 3.462. I, the slave-wife, to Helenus was given 3.463. and slave was wed with slave. But afterward 3.464. Orestes, crazed by loss of her he loved 3.465. and ever fury-driven from crime to crime 3.466. crept upon Pyrrhus in a careless hour 3.467. and murdered him upon his own hearth-stone. 3.468. Part of the realm of Neoptolemus 3.469. fell thus to Helenus, who called his lands 3.470. Chaonian, and in Trojan Chaon's name 3.471. his kingdom is Chaonia. Yonder height 3.472. is Pergamus, our Ilian citadel. 3.473. What power divine did waft thee to our shore 3.474. not knowing whither? Tell me of the boy 3.475. Ascanius! Still breathes he earthly air? 3.476. In Troy she bore him—is he mourning still 3.477. that mother ravished from his childhood's eyes? 3.478. what ancient valor stirs the manly soul 3.479. of thine own son, of Hector's sister's child?” 3.480. Thus poured she forth full many a doleful word 3.481. with unavailing tears. But as she ceased 3.482. out of the city gates appeared the son 3.483. of Priam, Helenus, with princely train. 3.484. He welcomed us as kin, and glad at heart 3.485. gave guidance to his house, though oft his words 3.486. fell faltering and few, with many a tear. 3.487. Soon to a humbler Troy I lift my eyes 3.488. and of a mightier Pergamus discern 3.489. the towering semblance; there a scanty stream 3.490. runs on in Xanthus ' name, and my glad arms 3.491. the pillars of a Scaean gate embrace. 3.492. My Teucrian mariners with welcome free 3.493. enjoyed the friendly town; his ample halls 3.494. our royal host threw wide; full wine-cups flowed 3.495. within the palace; golden feast was spread 3.496. and many a goblet quaffed. Day followed day 3.497. while favoring breezes beckoned us to sea 3.498. and swelled the waiting canvas as they blew. 3.499. Then to the prophet-priest I made this prayer: 3.500. “offspring of Troy, interpreter of Heaven! 3.501. Who knowest Phoebus' power, and readest well 3.502. the tripod, stars, and vocal laurel leaves 3.503. to Phoebus dear, who know'st of every bird 3.504. the ominous swift wing or boding song 3.505. o, speak! For all my course good omens showed
9. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 32-36, 31 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. But they have further also made up stories against us of impious feasts and forbidden intercourse between the sexes, both that they may appear to themselves to have rational grounds of hatred, and because they think either by fear to lead us away from our way of life, or to render the rulers harsh and inexorable by the magnitude of the charges they bring. But they lose their labour with those who know that from of old it has been the custom, and not in our time only, for vice to make war on virtue. Thus Pythagoras, with three hundred others, was burnt to death; Heraclitus and Democritus were banished, the one from the city of the Ephesians, the other from Abdera, because he was charged with being mad; and the Athenians condemned Socrates to death. But as they were none the worse in respect of virtue because of the opinion of the multitude, so neither does the undiscriminating calumny of some persons cast any shade upon us as regards rectitude of life, for with God we stand in good repute. Nevertheless, I will meet these charges also, although I am well assured that by what has been already said I have cleared myself to you. For as you excel all men in intelligence, you know that those whose life is directed towards God as its rule, so that each one among us may be blameless and irreproachable before Him, will not entertain even the thought of the slightest sin. For if we believed that we should live only the present life, then we might be suspected of sinning, through being enslaved to flesh and blood, or overmastered by gain or carnal desire; but since we know that God is witness to what we think and what we say both by night and by day, and that He, being Himself light, sees all things in our heart, we are persuaded that when we are removed from the present life we shall live another life, better than the present one, and heavenly, not earthly (since we shall abide near God, and with God, free from all change or suffering in the soul, not as flesh, even though we shall have flesh, but as heavenly spirit), or, falling with the rest, a worse one and in fire; for God has not made us as sheep or beasts of burden, a mere by-work, and that we should perish and be annihilated. On these grounds it is not likely that we should wish to do evil, or deliver ourselves over to the great Judge to be punished.
10. Justin, First Apology, 27-29, 26 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. And, thirdly, because after Christ's ascension into heaven the devils put forward certain men who said that they themselves were gods; and they were not only not persecuted by you, but even deemed worthy of honours. There was a Samaritan, Simon, a native of the village called Gitto, who in the reign of Claudius C sar, and in your royal city of Rome, did mighty acts of magic, by virtue of the art of the devils operating in him. He was considered a god, and as a god was honoured by you with a statue, which statue was erected on the river Tiber, between the two bridges, and bore this inscription, in the language of Rome: - Simoni Deo Sancto, To Simon the holy God. And almost all the Samaritans, and a few even of other nations, worship him, and acknowledge him as the first god; and a woman, Helena, who went about with him at that time, and had formerly been a prostitute, they say is the first idea generated by him. And a man, Meder, also a Samaritan, of the town Capparet a, a disciple of Simon, and inspired by devils, we know to have deceived many while he was in Antioch by his magical art. He persuaded those who adhered to him that they should never die, and even now there are some living who hold this opinion of his. And there is Marcion, a man of Pontus, who is even at this day alive, and teaching his disciples to believe in some other god greater than the Creator. And he, by the aid of the devils, has caused many of every nation to speak blasphemies, and to deny that God is the maker of this universe, and to assert that some other being, greater than He, has done greater works. All who take their opinions from these men, are, as we before said, called Christians; just as also those who do not agree with the philosophers in their doctrines, have yet in common with them the name of philosophers given to them. And whether they perpetrate those fabulous and shameful deeds - the upsetting of the lamp, and promiscuous intercourse, and eating human flesh - we know not; but we do know that they are neither persecuted nor put to death by you, at least on account of their opinions. But I have a treatise against all the heresies that have existed already composed, which, if you wish to read it, I will give you.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham, in odyssey Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
abraham, odysseus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
abraham, tobiah Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
achaemenides Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
aeneas, ignorance of the odyssey Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
agamemnon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
and paganism, ; engenders hatred Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
andromache Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
antenor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
buthrotum Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
curse Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
cyclops Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
diet, in ethnographic imagination Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
divine (δίκη), in context of supplication Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 115
drunkenness Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
endogamy Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
epic cycle Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
ethnography, and ethical inquiry Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
ethnography Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
family, in tobit Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
fish Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
gabael Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
helenus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
hobden, fiona Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
homecoming Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
homecomings (nostoi) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
homer, commensality in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
homer, odysseus, love and adventures Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, aea Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, aeolus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, alcinous Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, carybdis Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, cicones Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, circe Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, cyclops, cyclopes Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, ino-leucothea Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, ithaca Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, laestrygonians Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, lotus-eaters Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, ogygia Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, phaeacians Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, polyphemus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, poseidon Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, scheria Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, scylla Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, sirens Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
hosios (and cognates), in context of supplication Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 115
inheritance, moral and religious Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
intermediaries, divine, azariah, dispatched to rages Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
jonah, odysseus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
jonah, paul (apostle) Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
jonah, tobiah Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
journey, in odyssey Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
jupiter Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
leadership Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
marriage, arranged in heaven Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
marriage, endogamic Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
menelaus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
mysteries; described Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
mysteries; require silence Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
narratives Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
narrators, internal, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
nestor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
nostos, νόστος, return home, tobiah Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
persians, herodotus ethnography Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
phemius Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
poetry, ethnographic evidence in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
polyphemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
pyrrhus/neoptolemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
rages Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
religion; christian' Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
sirens; negative metaphor for christians Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
supplication, general discussion Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 115
symposia Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 505
telemachus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
third ways Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
tiberius; contemporary with rise of christianity Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
time, narrative chronology Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
tragic, mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
twists, turns, in odyssey Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
venus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
vergil, aeneid, ancient scholarship on Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, cyclic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
zeus, ξένιος Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 115