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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 9.14
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 19 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

19. And fair Dione, Leto, Iapeto
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.1-1.7, 1.573-1.576, 1.595-1.602, 2.301-2.303, 4.1-4.4, 9.185-9.191, 11.218, 24.723-24.745 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.1. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.2. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.3. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.4. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.5. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.5. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.6. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.7. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.573. /and among them Hephaestus, the famed craftsman, was first to speak, doing pleasure to his dear mother, white-armed Hera:Surely this will be sorry work, that is no longer bearable, if you two are to wrangle thus for mortals' sakes, and set the gods in tumult; neither will there be any joy in the excellent feast 1.574. /and among them Hephaestus, the famed craftsman, was first to speak, doing pleasure to his dear mother, white-armed Hera:Surely this will be sorry work, that is no longer bearable, if you two are to wrangle thus for mortals' sakes, and set the gods in tumult; neither will there be any joy in the excellent feast 1.575. /since worse things prevail. And I give counsel to my mother, wise though she be herself, to do pleasure to our dear father Zeus, that the father upbraid her not again, and bring confusion upon our feast. What if the Olympian, the lord of the lightning, were minded 1.576. /since worse things prevail. And I give counsel to my mother, wise though she be herself, to do pleasure to our dear father Zeus, that the father upbraid her not again, and bring confusion upon our feast. What if the Olympian, the lord of the lightning, were minded 1.595. /and smiling took in her hand the cup from her son. Then he poured wine for all the other gods from left to right, drawing forth sweet nectar from the bowl. And unquenchable laughter arose among the blessed gods, as they saw Hephaestus puffing through the palace. 1.596. /and smiling took in her hand the cup from her son. Then he poured wine for all the other gods from left to right, drawing forth sweet nectar from the bowl. And unquenchable laughter arose among the blessed gods, as they saw Hephaestus puffing through the palace. 1.597. /and smiling took in her hand the cup from her son. Then he poured wine for all the other gods from left to right, drawing forth sweet nectar from the bowl. And unquenchable laughter arose among the blessed gods, as they saw Hephaestus puffing through the palace. 1.598. /and smiling took in her hand the cup from her son. Then he poured wine for all the other gods from left to right, drawing forth sweet nectar from the bowl. And unquenchable laughter arose among the blessed gods, as they saw Hephaestus puffing through the palace. 1.599. /and smiling took in her hand the cup from her son. Then he poured wine for all the other gods from left to right, drawing forth sweet nectar from the bowl. And unquenchable laughter arose among the blessed gods, as they saw Hephaestus puffing through the palace. 1.600. /Thus the whole day long till the setting of the sun they feasted, nor did their heart lack anything of the equal feast, nor of the beauteous lyre, that Apollo held, nor yet of the Muses, who sang, replying one to the other with sweet voices.But when the bright light of the sun was set 1.601. /Thus the whole day long till the setting of the sun they feasted, nor did their heart lack anything of the equal feast, nor of the beauteous lyre, that Apollo held, nor yet of the Muses, who sang, replying one to the other with sweet voices.But when the bright light of the sun was set 1.602. /Thus the whole day long till the setting of the sun they feasted, nor did their heart lack anything of the equal feast, nor of the beauteous lyre, that Apollo held, nor yet of the Muses, who sang, replying one to the other with sweet voices.But when the bright light of the sun was set 2.301. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.302. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.303. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 4.1. /Now the gods, seated by the side of Zeus, were holding assembly on the golden floor, and in their midst the queenly Hebe poured them nectar, and they with golden goblets pledged one the other as they looked forth upon the city of the Trojans. 4.2. /Now the gods, seated by the side of Zeus, were holding assembly on the golden floor, and in their midst the queenly Hebe poured them nectar, and they with golden goblets pledged one the other as they looked forth upon the city of the Trojans. 4.3. /Now the gods, seated by the side of Zeus, were holding assembly on the golden floor, and in their midst the queenly Hebe poured them nectar, and they with golden goblets pledged one the other as they looked forth upon the city of the Trojans. 4.4. /Now the gods, seated by the side of Zeus, were holding assembly on the golden floor, and in their midst the queenly Hebe poured them nectar, and they with golden goblets pledged one the other as they looked forth upon the city of the Trojans. 9.185. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.186. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.187. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.188. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.189. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.190. /and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat; 9.191. /and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat; 11.218. /and the Argives over against them made strong their battalions. And the battle was set in array, and they stood over against each other, and among them Agamemnon rushed forth the first, and was minded to fight far in advance of all.Tell me now, ye Muses, that have dwellings on Olympus, who it was that first came to face Agamemnon 24.723. /laid him on a corded bedstead, and by his side set singers, leaders of the dirge, who led the song of lamentation—they chanted the dirge, and thereat the women made lament. And amid these white-armed Andromache led the wailing, holding in her arms the while the head of man-slaying Hector: 24.724. /laid him on a corded bedstead, and by his side set singers, leaders of the dirge, who led the song of lamentation—they chanted the dirge, and thereat the women made lament. And amid these white-armed Andromache led the wailing, holding in her arms the while the head of man-slaying Hector: 24.725. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.726. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.727. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.728. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.729. / Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover 24.730. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.731. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.732. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.733. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.734. /thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.735. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.736. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.737. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.738. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.739. /and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.740. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.741. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.742. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.743. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.744. /Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.745. /I might have pondered night and day with shedding of tears.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 1.1-1.9, 4.219-4.226, 8.490, 8.517-8.520, 8.548-8.549, 8.572-8.580, 9.1-9.13, 9.15-9.18, 9.39, 12.450, 12.453, 17.286, 17.463-17.464, 17.473, 17.475-17.480, 18.349-18.355 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Theognis, Elegies, 1064-1068, 425-426, 479-488, 495, 1063 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1312, 1311 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1311. ὁ δ' ἀνακραγὼν ἀντῄκας' αὐτὸν πάρνοπι
6. Euripides, Fragments, 1079, 1078 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1079, 1078 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1078. Alas! Would I could stand and face myself, so should I weep to see the sorrows I endure. Theseu
8. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Plato, Statesman, 269 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 511, 510 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Theocritus, Idylls, 17.4-17.5 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

12. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.460-1.474 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.460. ἔνθʼ αὖτʼ Αἰσονίδης μὲν ἀμήχανος εἰν ἑοῖ αὐτῷ 1.461. πορφύρεσκεν ἕκαστα κατηφιόωντι ἐοικώς. 1.462. τὸν δʼ ἄρʼ ὑποφρασθεὶς μεγάλῃ ὀπὶ νείκεσεν Ἴδας· 1.463. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε μετὰ φρεσὶ μῆτιν ἑλίσσεις; 1.464. αὔδα ἐνὶ μέσσοισι τεὸν νόον. ἦέ σε δαμνᾷ 1.465. τάρβος ἐπιπλόμενον, τό τʼ ἀνάλκιδας ἄνδρας ἀτύζει; 1.466. ἴστω νῦν δόρυ θοῦρον, ὅτῳ περιώσιον ἄλλων 1.467. κῦδος ἐνὶ πτολέμοισιν ἀείρομαι, οὐδέ μʼ ὀφέλλει 1.468. Ζεὺς τόσον, ὁσσάτιόν περ ἐμὸν δόρυ, μή νύ τι πῆμα 1.469. λοίγιον ἔσσεσθαι, μηδʼ ἀκράαντον ἄεθλον 1.470. Ἴδεω ἑσπομένοιο, καὶ εἰ θεὸς ἀντιόῳτο. 1.471. τοῖόν μʼ Ἀρήνηθεν ἀοσσητῆρα κομίζεις.’ 1.472. ἦ, καὶ ἐπισχόμενος πλεῖον δέπας ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.473. πῖνε χαλίκρητον λαρὸν μέθυ· δεύετο δʼ οἴνῳ 1.474. χείλεα, κυάνεαί τε γενειάδες· οἱ δʼ ὁμάδησαν
13. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.197 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.197. Was set within my breast, and it bade me
14. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 5.925-5.926 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.203, 1.738-1.740, 2.3-2.13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.738. No Libyan hearth shall suffer by our sword 1.739. nor spoil and plunder to our ships be borne; 1.740. uch haughty violence fits not the souls 2.3. Father Aeneas with these words began :— 2.4. A grief unspeakable thy gracious word 2.5. o sovereign lady, bids my heart live o'er: 2.6. how Asia 's glory and afflicted throne 2.7. the Greek flung down; which woeful scene I saw 2.8. and bore great part in each event I tell. 2.9. But O! in telling, what Dolopian churl 2.10. or Myrmidon, or gory follower 2.11. of grim Ulysses could the tears restrain? 2.12. 'T is evening; lo! the dews of night begin 2.13. to fall from heaven, and yonder sinking stars
16. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 27.3-27.4 (1st cent. CE

27.3.  And others, too, who are naturally loquacious, feeling that they have got their table-companions for an audience, recite stupid and tedious speeches; while still others sing in tune and out of tune, although they have no gift whatever for music; and one might almost say that they give more annoyance than those who quarrel and use abusive language. But there is another class of men who claim to be abstemious and temperate, that bore people to death by their disagreeable manner, since they will not condescend either to drink moderately or to take part in the general conversation. 27.4.  But the man that is gentle and has a properly ordered character, easily endures the rudeness of the others, and acts like a gentleman himself, trying to the best of his ability to bring the ignorant chorus into a proper demeanour by means of fitting rhythm and melody. And he introduces appropriate topics of conversation and by his tact and persuasiveness attempts to get those present to be more harmonious and friendly in their intercourse with one another.
17. Plutarch, Table Talk, 1.1, 7.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 90 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Lucian, A True Story, 2.14-2.15, 2.20 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Anon., Scholia On Homer'S Iliad, 1.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, evolution of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
achilles Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 131, 221
achilles tatius Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 132
adam Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
agamemnon Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 131
alcinous Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 92, 98, 99, 112, 115, 116, 117
allegory Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
anacreon Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 96
anaxenor, kitharode Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 115
anger, in greek epic Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
anger of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
aphrodite, song of ares and aphrodite Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 94, 113
apocalyptic / apocalypticism Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
apollonius of rhodes Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 118, 119, 120, 121, 122
aristophanes, wasps Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 117, 118
aristotle Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 96, 101, 129
athenaeus, deipnosophistae Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 94, 96
athens Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
bandits Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
banquet, as place for pleasure Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
basil, st Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 94
briseis Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 131
carpe diem, survey of Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
charicleia Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
classical scholarship, late hexameter in Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 45
contest of homer and hesiod Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 93, 111, 112
conversion, greek ecphrasis Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 26
cronus Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
cyclops, the Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 122
demodocus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60; Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 113, 115, 116
destruction Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
dionysius of halicarnassus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 129
ecphrasis, and thauma Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 26
ecphrasis, in epigram Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 26
ecphrasis Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 26
eleos/eleeo and aristotle, in homer Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
epic poetry, greek Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
epicureanism, in homer Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 115
epicureanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132
epigrams, christian Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 26
epyllion, narrative self-consciousness Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 45
epyllion, perspective Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 45
eratosthenes Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 119, 120
euenus of paros Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 121
euphrosyne Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 99, 103, 106, 119, 121
euripides, hippolytus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
eustathius Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 97, 115, 129, 221
eve Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
exhortation (to enjoyment), types of Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
exhortation (to enjoyment) Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
gods in homer Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 53
golden age Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
graeco-roman, literature Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
hector, mourned by andromache Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
hephaestus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 53, 120; Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
heraclides ponticus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 94
hermogenes Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 95
herodotus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 131
hesiod Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 111
homer, repetitions in Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 128, 129
homer/homeric Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
homer Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122; Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
idas Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 121, 122
lamentation Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
luxury Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
macrobius Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 100
maximus of tyre Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 108, 109, 110
megacleides Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 95
menelaus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
metiochus and parthenope Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 124
mourning Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
muses, the, nausicaa Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 125
muses, the Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 121
muses Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
nestor Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 117
nile Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
odysseus, and demodocus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
odysseus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 172; Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122; Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
oedipus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 99
orpheus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 119, 121
pandaros, parasite, odysseus as Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 172
patroclus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 221
penelope Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 172
phaeacians Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 94, 95, 100, 116, 119
philophrosyne Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 106, 107
pity, of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
pity, self-pity Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
plato, myths Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
plato, performance of dialogues Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 114
plato, protagoras Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 104
plato, republic Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 93, 104
plato, symposium Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 96, 98, 107
plato Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
plutarch, symposium Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 106, 111, 122, 123, 124
plutarch, sympotic questions Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 96, 107, 108, 114, 121
plutarch Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 105, 106, 107, 108
prophecies Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
reader engagement, with epyllion Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 45
riddles Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 111
scholarship, alexandrian Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 119, 120
scholia on homer Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 130, 132
seikilos Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
seleukos of alexandria Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 95
sex, denial of Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 8
sibyl Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
simonides Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 102, 104
sin Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
suffering, of odysseus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
sun Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
symposia, in homer Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 97, 98, 99, 100, 112, 113, 114
symposia Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125
teiresias Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 172
temporality, in epigram Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 26
thauma (wonder), ecphrasis and Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 26
theagenes Repath and Whitmarsh, Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica (2022) 73
theognis Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 96
theology, reflection in judaeo-christian terms' Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 122
theon, aelius Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 128, 130
thucydides Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 130, 131
trimalchio Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 104
troy/trojans Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 60
xenophon, symposium Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 107
zenodotus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 132
zeus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 121