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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 9.106
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 117-118, 133-139, 221, 103 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

103. Dreadful distress by scattering it afar.
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.579, 22.263 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.579. /since worse things prevail. And I give counsel to my mother, wise though she be herself, to do pleasure to our dear father Zeus, that the father upbraid her not again, and bring confusion upon our feast. What if the Olympian, the lord of the lightning, were minded 22.263. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake unto him Achilles, swift of foot:Hector, talk not to me, thou madman, of covets. As between lions and men there are no oaths of faith, nor do wolves and lambs have hearts of concord but are evil-minded continually one against the other
3. Homer, Odyssey, 1.3, 1.30-1.43, 1.325-1.327, 3.130-3.198, 4.227-4.232, 4.332-4.586, 6.274, 7.32-7.33, 7.118, 9.105, 9.107-9.144, 9.147-9.148, 9.159-9.162, 9.166, 9.172-9.176, 9.183, 9.187-9.192, 9.197, 9.210-9.211, 9.217, 9.219, 9.224-9.228, 9.231-9.234, 9.236, 9.243, 9.250-9.416, 9.422, 9.428, 9.432, 9.440-9.441, 9.444-9.445, 9.447-9.460, 9.467, 9.475-9.479, 9.500, 9.504, 9.508-9.510, 9.515, 9.517-9.536, 9.545, 9.550-9.555, 9.557, 11.387-11.464, 13.383-13.385, 24.19-24.97 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 698 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 7.2.23 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.2.23. When the Greek party had drawn near, Seuthes directed Xenophon to come in, with any two men he might choose to bring with him. As soon as they were inside, they first greeted one another and drank healths after the Thracian fashion in horns of wine; and Seuthes had Medosades present also, the same man who went everywhere as his envoy. See Xen. Anab. 7.1.5, and 10 above.
6. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 2.339, 3.55, 3.90, 3.187, 3.419-3.425, 3.788 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

2.339. To parents filial duty, and all who 3.55. 55 But when Rome shall o'er Egypt also rule 3.90. 90 Who put their trust in him. And thereupon 3.187. With mortals the prime origin of war.] 3.419. Shall leave Mæotis's lake, and there shall be 3.420. 420 Down the deep stream a fruitful, furrow's track 3.421. And the vast flow shall hold a neck of land. 3.422. And there are hollow chasms and yawning pits; 3.423. And many cities, men and all, shall fall:– 3.424. In Asia–Iassus, Cebren, Pandonia 3.425. 425 Colophon, Ephesus, Nicæa, Antioch
7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.208-1.214, 5.210-5.212 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.90-1.110 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.242-1.249, 1.302-1.303, 1.539-1.541, 1.602, 3.4-3.5, 3.294-3.505 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.242. Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched 1.243. the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there 1.244. torm-buffeted, might sail within his ken 1.245. with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners 1.246. or Capys or Caicus armor-clad 1.247. upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; 1.248. but while he looks, three stags along the shore 1.249. come straying by, and close behind them comes 1.302. and nations populous from shore to shore 1.303. paused on the peak of heaven, and fixed his gaze 1.539. But Venus could not let him longer plain 1.541. “Whoe'er thou art 1.602. leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; 3.4. in smouldering ash lay level with the ground 3.5. to wandering exile then and regions wild 3.294. or ken our way. Three days of blinding dark 3.295. three nights without a star, we roved the seas; 3.296. The fourth, land seemed to rise. Far distant hills 3.297. and rolling smoke we saw. Down came our sails 3.298. out flew the oars, and with prompt stroke the crews 3.299. wept the dark waves and tossed the crested foam. 3.300. From such sea-peril safe, I made the shores 3.301. of Strophades,—a name the Grecians gave 3.302. to islands in the broad Ionic main, — 3.303. the Strophades, where dread Celaeno bides 3.304. with other Harpies, who had quit the halls 3.305. of stricken Phineus, and for very fear 3.306. fled from the routed feast; no prodigy 3.307. more vile than these, nor plague more pitiless 3.308. ere rose by wrath divine from Stygian wave; 3.309. birds seem they, but with face like woman-kind; 3.310. foul-flowing bellies, hands with crooked claws 3.311. and ghastly lips they have, with hunger pale. 3.312. Scarce had we made the haven, when, behold! 3.313. Fair herds of cattle roaming a wide plain 3.314. and horned goats, untended, feeding free 3.315. in pastures green, surprised our happy eyes. 3.316. with eager blades we ran to take and slay 3.317. asking of every god, and chicfly Jove 3.318. to share the welcome prize: we ranged a feast 3.319. with turf-built couches and a banquet-board 3.320. along the curving strand. But in a trice 3.321. down from the high hills swooping horribly 3.322. the Harpies loudly shrieking, flapped their wings 3.323. natched at our meats, and with infectious touch 3.324. polluted all; infernal was their cry 3.325. the stench most vile. Once more in covert far 3.326. beneath a caverned rock, and close concealed 3.327. with trees and branching shade, we raised aloft 3.328. our tables, altars, and rekindled fires. 3.329. Once more from haunts unknown the clamorous flock 3.330. from every quarter flew, and seized its prey 3.331. with taloned feet and carrion lip most foul. 3.332. I called my mates to arms and opened war 3.333. on that accursed brood. My band obeyed; 3.334. and, hiding in deep grass their swords and shields 3.335. in ambush lay. But presently the foe 3.336. wept o'er the winding shore with loud alarm : 3.337. then from a sentry-crag, Misenus blew 3.338. a signal on his hollow horn. My men 3.339. flew to the combat strange, and fain would wound 3.340. with martial steel those foul birds of the sea; 3.341. but on their sides no wounding blade could fall 3.342. nor any plume be marred. In swiftest flight 3.343. to starry skies they soared, and left on earth 3.344. their half-gnawed, stolen feast, and footprints foul. 3.345. Celaeno only on a beetling crag 3.346. took lofty perch, and, prophetess of ill 3.347. hrieked malediction from her vulture breast: 3.348. “Because of slaughtered kine and ravished herd 3.349. ons of Laomedon, have ye made war? 3.350. And will ye from their rightful kingdom drive 3.351. the guiltless Harpies? Hear, O, hear my word 3.352. (Long in your bosoms may it rankle sore!) 3.353. which Jove omnipotent to Phoebus gave 3.354. Phoebus to me: a word of doom, which I 3.355. the Furies' elder sister, here unfold: 3.356. ‘To Italy ye fare. The willing winds 3.357. your call have heard; and ye shall have your prayer 3.358. in some Italian haven safely moored. 3.359. But never shall ye rear the circling walls 3.360. of your own city, till for this our blood 3.361. by you unjustly spilt, your famished jaws 3.363. She spoke: her pinions bore her to the grove 3.364. and she was seen no more. But all my band 3.365. huddered with shock of fear in each cold vein; 3.366. their drooping spirits trusted swords no more 3.367. but turned to prayers and offerings, asking grace 3.368. carce knowing if those creatures were divine 3.369. or but vast birds, ill-omened and unclean. 3.370. Father Anchises to the gods in heaven 3.371. uplifted suppliant hands, and on that shore 3.372. due ritual made, crying aloud; “Ye gods 3.373. avert this curse, this evil turn away! 3.374. Smile, Heaven, upon your faithful votaries.” 3.375. Then bade he launch away, the chain undo 3.376. et every cable free and spread all sail. 3.377. O'er the white waves we flew, and took our way 3.378. where'er the helmsman or the winds could guide. 3.379. Now forest-clad Zacynthus met our gaze 3.380. engirdled by the waves; Dulichium 3.381. ame, and Neritos, a rocky steep 3.382. uprose. We passed the cliffs of Ithaca 3.383. that called Laertes king, and flung our curse 3.384. on fierce Ulysses' hearth and native land. 3.385. nigh hoar Leucate's clouded crest we drew 3.386. where Phoebus' temple, feared by mariners 3.387. loomed o'er us; thitherward we steered and reached 3.388. the little port and town. Our weary fleet 3.390. So, safe at land, our hopeless peril past 3.391. we offered thanks to Jove, and kindled high 3.392. his altars with our feast and sacrifice; 3.393. then, gathering on Actium 's holy shore 3.394. made fair solemnities of pomp and game. 3.395. My youth, anointing their smooth, naked limbs 3.396. wrestled our wonted way. For glad were we 3.397. who past so many isles of Greece had sped 3.398. and 'scaped our circling foes. Now had the sun 3.399. rolled through the year's full circle, and the waves 3.400. were rough with icy winter's northern gales. 3.401. I hung for trophy on that temple door 3.402. a swelling shield of brass (which once was worn 3.403. by mighty Abas) graven with this line: 3.404. SPOIL OF AENEAS FROM TRIUMPHANT FOES. 3.405. Then from that haven I command them forth; 3.406. my good crews take the thwarts, smiting the sea 3.407. with rival strokes, and skim the level main. 3.408. Soon sank Phaeacia's wind-swept citadels 3.409. out of our view; we skirted the bold shores 3.410. of proud Epirus, in Chaonian land 3.412. Here wondrous tidings met us, that the son 3.413. of Priam, Helenus, held kingly sway 3.414. o'er many Argive cities, having wed 3.415. the Queen of Pyrrhus, great Achilles' son 3.416. and gained his throne; and that Andromache 3.417. once more was wife unto a kindred lord. 3.418. Amazement held me; all my bosom burned 3.419. to see the hero's face and hear this tale 3.420. of strange vicissitude. So up I climbed 3.421. leaving the haven, fleet, and friendly shore. 3.422. That self-same hour outside the city walls 3.423. within a grove where flowed the mimic stream 3.424. of a new Simois, Andromache 3.425. with offerings to the dead, and gifts of woe 3.426. poured forth libation, and invoked the shade 3.427. of Hector, at a tomb which her fond grief 3.428. had consecrated to perpetual tears 3.429. though void; a mound of fair green turf it stood 3.430. and near it rose twin altars to his name. 3.431. She saw me drawing near; our Trojan helms 3.432. met her bewildered eyes, and, terror-struck 3.433. at the portentous sight, she swooning fell 3.434. and lay cold, rigid, lifeless, till at last 3.435. carce finding voice, her lips addressed me thus : 3.436. “Have I true vision? Bringest thou the word 3.437. of truth, O goddess-born? Art still in flesh? 3.438. Or if sweet light be fled, my Hector, where?” 3.439. With flood of tears she spoke, and all the grove 3.440. reechoed to her cry. Scarce could I frame 3.441. brief answer to her passion, but replied 3.442. with broken voice and accents faltering: 3.443. “I live, 't is true. I lengthen out my days 3.444. through many a desperate strait. But O, believe 3.445. that what thine eyes behold is vision true. 3.446. Alas! what lot is thine, that wert unthroned 3.447. from such a husband's side? What after-fate 3.448. could give thee honor due? Andromache 3.450. With drooping brows and lowly voice she cried : 3.451. “O, happy only was that virgin blest 3.452. daughter of Priam, summoned forth to die 3.453. in sight of Ilium, on a foeman's tomb! 3.454. No casting of the lot her doom decreed 3.455. nor came she to her conqueror's couch a slave. 3.456. Myself from burning Ilium carried far 3.457. o'er seas and seas, endured the swollen pride 3.458. of that young scion of Achilles' race 3.459. and bore him as his slave a son. When he 3.460. ued for Hermione, of Leda's line 3.461. and nuptial-bond with Lacedaemon's Iords 3.462. I, the slave-wife, to Helenus was given 3.463. and slave was wed with slave. But afterward 3.464. Orestes, crazed by loss of her he loved 3.465. and ever fury-driven from crime to crime 3.466. crept upon Pyrrhus in a careless hour 3.467. and murdered him upon his own hearth-stone. 3.468. Part of the realm of Neoptolemus 3.469. fell thus to Helenus, who called his lands 3.470. Chaonian, and in Trojan Chaon's name 3.471. his kingdom is Chaonia. Yonder height 3.472. is Pergamus, our Ilian citadel. 3.473. What power divine did waft thee to our shore 3.474. not knowing whither? Tell me of the boy 3.475. Ascanius! Still breathes he earthly air? 3.476. In Troy she bore him—is he mourning still 3.477. that mother ravished from his childhood's eyes? 3.478. what ancient valor stirs the manly soul 3.479. of thine own son, of Hector's sister's child?” 3.480. Thus poured she forth full many a doleful word 3.481. with unavailing tears. But as she ceased 3.482. out of the city gates appeared the son 3.483. of Priam, Helenus, with princely train. 3.484. He welcomed us as kin, and glad at heart 3.485. gave guidance to his house, though oft his words 3.486. fell faltering and few, with many a tear. 3.487. Soon to a humbler Troy I lift my eyes 3.488. and of a mightier Pergamus discern 3.489. the towering semblance; there a scanty stream 3.490. runs on in Xanthus ' name, and my glad arms 3.491. the pillars of a Scaean gate embrace. 3.492. My Teucrian mariners with welcome free 3.493. enjoyed the friendly town; his ample halls 3.494. our royal host threw wide; full wine-cups flowed 3.495. within the palace; golden feast was spread 3.496. and many a goblet quaffed. Day followed day 3.497. while favoring breezes beckoned us to sea 3.498. and swelled the waiting canvas as they blew. 3.499. Then to the prophet-priest I made this prayer: 3.500. “offspring of Troy, interpreter of Heaven! 3.501. Who knowest Phoebus' power, and readest well 3.502. the tripod, stars, and vocal laurel leaves 3.503. to Phoebus dear, who know'st of every bird 3.504. the ominous swift wing or boding song 3.505. o, speak! For all my course good omens showed


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaemenides Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
aeneas, ignorance of the odyssey Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
agamemnon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
ages of man, golden Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18
agriculture Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130; Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
anabasis, xenophons Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 88
and paganism, ; engenders hatred Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
andromache Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
antenor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
arete Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
athena parthenos, in the odyssey Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
buthrotum Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
carthage, as thebes Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
carthage, mirror of rome Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
carthaginians, as phoenicians Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
carthaginians, as trojans/romans Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 142
cassandra Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
chalybes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 88
cognitive linguistics Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 58, 59
culture history, cyclops, race of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
cyclop(e)s Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18
cyclopes Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
cyclops, cyclopes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87, 88
cyclops Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
discourse, ethnographic Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87
distribution, of θέμις Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 58, 59
earth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
egypt, egyptians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 88
epic cycle Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
fate, fates Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
greek, authority Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
greeks (ancient) Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
hector Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
helenus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
hera Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
herodotus Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 57
hesiod, works and days Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18
hesiod Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
homecoming Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
homecomings (nostoi) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
homer, iliad Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 57
homer, odyssey Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 57
homer Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115; Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
iliad, homers Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87
ithaca Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18
jupiter Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
law Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
lawlessness Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18
leadership Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
menelaus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
mental lexicon, mentality, change of Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 58, 59
mode, historiographical Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87
modello-codice, homer as Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87
mysteries; described Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
mysteries; require silence Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
narratives Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
narrators, internal, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
natural history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
nestor Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
non-greeks Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87, 88
odyssey, homers Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87, 88
ovid Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
paradise Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
phaeacia, phaeacians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87
phemius Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
philosophers, ancient Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
plants Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
polyphemus Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
punishment Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
pyrrhus/neoptolemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
religion; christian' Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
simulus Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 57
sirens; negative metaphor for christians Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
symposium Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18
telemachus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
themis Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 58, 59
third ways Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
thrace, thracians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 88
tiberius; contemporary with rise of christianity Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 21
timai (of gods) Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 58
time, narrative chronology Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
tragic, mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130; Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
troy, trojans Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 87
venus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
vergil, aeneid, ancient scholarship on Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, cyclic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
vulcan Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 57
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 130
xenocrates Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
xenophanes Blum and Biggs, The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature (2019) 18
xenophon Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 88
zeus, justice and - Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 58
zeus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115; Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 123